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Breakout Sessions at the 2016 Assembly

Breakout Sessions are organized by the respective partners of the Arctic Circle, organizations, institutions, companies, think tanks, universities, or other bodies.

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Arctic Economic and Business Development

Organized by the Arctic Economic Council and the Icelandic-Arctic Chamber of Commerce (26. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 15:30-17:00

Location: Akrafjall, Harpa Fourth Level

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Speakers

  • Ragnheidur Elin Arnadottir, Minister of Industry and Commerce, Iceland
  • Tara Sweeney, Executive Vice President of External Affairs, Arctic Slope Regional Corporation; Chair of the Arctic Economic Council
  • Tero Vauraste, President and Chief Executive Officer, Arctia Ltd.; Co Vice-Chair of the Arctic Economic Council
  • Mead Treadwell, former Lieutenant Governor of Alaska; President, Pt Capital

Aviation in the Arctic

Organized by Verkís Consulting Engineers & Air Iceland (25. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 15:30-17:00

Location: Björtuloft, Harpa Fifth Level

What are the challenges every day to operate airlines, airfields, design of airports/airfields, in this area? Focus are on more access to the artic area. Designing and construction of extension to an airport in full operation needs to focus on limit the influences on the day-to-day operation of the airport. The challenge for the design group is to find innovative ways to limit the disruption for the passengers while fulfilling the needs of the airport for expansion. 

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Being a growing hub in the mid-Atlantic, Keflavik airport, with two home based carriers that rely on efficient and accessible infrastructure while providing safe and secure journey requires detailed planning to get necessary requirements for construction right as well as detailed planning due to short construction season and not to interfere with winter operations.
Designing an airport in artic climate also have to consider the weather conditions, which influence planning, and design of all apron, taxiway, runway and other outdoor constructions.

 

Speakers:

  • Árni Gunnarsson, Air Iceland: Airline operation in the Arctic
  • Stefán Friðleifsson, Verkís: Design airports in Iceland
  • Guðmundur Daði Rúnarsson, ISAVIA: Access to the North-Artic – effect on air traffic
  • Niels Grosen, Acting Managing Director and Chief Operation Officer, Greenland Airports: Running Airports in Greenland.

At the Center of Periphery: Social Justice and Social Action in the Arctic

Organized by the Anchorage Museum, Alaska (24. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 15:30-17:00

Location: Eyri, Harpa Second Level

Climate has become the principal narrative for the Arctic, but cultural, social, political, and economic changes are also greatly affecting the lives of residents.

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Issues of access and rights to land and resource, questions of cultural vitality, including language retention and the intergenerational transfer of Indigenous knowledge, disparities in health outcomes, the quest for greater self-determination, and immigration are some of the many forces shaping the lifeways and movement of people in the Arctic.  Today’s North is full of differing views of land and place held by travelers and hosts, colonizers, immigrants and original inhabitants.

 In these contemporary places, ideas around social justice and social action prompt new ways of thinking.  Artists, activists, culture bearers, environmentalists, scientists, researchers, and others work to reconcile diverse and contested perspectives.  Globalization of Northern places prompts discussions of indigenous knowledge, technologies, religions, sacred sites, social structures, relationships, wildlife, ecosystems, and economies.

 As a staged authenticity is built for tourism, Arctic places are at risk of being a consumer product that is exhaustible, but through diverse perspectives and rich conversations about possible futures, the Arctic can claim a much more powerful and empowered narrative.

Chair:

  • Julie Decker, Director, CEO, Anchorage Museum 

Speakers:

  • Ronald Broglio, Associate Professor, Arizona State University
  • Marek Ranis, artist
  • Mara Kimmel, Senior Fellow, Institute of the North, Alaska
  • Bryndís Snæbjörnsdóttir and Mark Wilson, artists
  • Robert Templer, Professor of Practice and Director of the Center for Conflict, Negotiation and Recovery at Central European University

Arctic Innovation Lab: 12 Ideas for a Better Arctic

Organized by the Harvard Kennedy School of Government in collaboration with the Iceland School of Energy at Reykjavík University, the University of Greenland, the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and the University of Iceland (26. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 15:30-17:00

Location: Norðurljós, Harpa Second Level

Come and hear twelve ideas about how to do things better in the Arctic and vote for your favorite one. In this session, twelve talents from five universities will present their ideas in a short pitch, which will be followed by roundtable discussions where the audience will get to participate. Ideas cover a wide range of issues including risk medication, science diplomacy, naval security and renewable energy technologies.

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Speakers

  • Cole Wheeler, M.P.P. Student, Harvard Kennedy School of Government: Carbon-Negative Manufacturing.
  • Caroline Galvan, M.P.A. Student, Harvard Kennedy School of Government: Global Risks, Building Resilience: A Pathway for the Arctic.
  • Ulunnguaq Markussen, Student, University of Greenland: Who is a Greenlander Without the Traditional Culture?
  • Jennifer Helfrich, Roy Family Student Fellow, M.P.P. Student, Harvard Kennedy School of Government: Creating a Narrative: Communicating Arctic Issues.
  • Shauna Theel, M.P.P. Student, Harvard Kennedy School of Government: Electric Car Shares in Iceland: An Opportunity for Early Adoption.
  • Rahul Srinivasan, M.P.P. Student, Harvard Kennedy School of Government: Exporting Renewable Energy from the Arctic.
  • Alexander Moses, Graduate Student, Iceland School of Energy, Reykjavík University: Tackling Logistics, Environment and Sustainability in Arctic Community Energy Systems.

Speakers (continued)

  • Earl Potter, M.P.A. Candidate, Harvard Kennedy School of Government: The Coast Guard and the Emerging Arctic.
  • Riley S. Newman, MSc Candidate, Iceland School of Energy, Reykjavík University: Addressing the Importance of Building Human Capacity in Remote Communities to Ensure the Sustainability of Remote Energy Networks.
  • David Cook, PhD Candidate, Lecturer in Environmental Economics; University of Iceland: Managing risk in the High North - the case for an Arctic Treaty
  • Molly Douglas, M.A.L.D. Student, the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University: A Partnership for Advancing Sustainable Infrastructure Development in the Arctic.
  • Dennis Schroeder, MPA Student, Harvard Kennedy School of Government: Creating Common Grounds - Science Diplomacy in the Arctic.

Moderator

Halla Hrund Logadóttir, Louis Bacon Environmental Fellow, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

Prospect North: How Can Design and Technology Transform Community Engagement Across the High North?

Organized by the Scottish Government, Lateral North and Soluis Group (2. September 2016)

Friday, October 7, 15:30-17:00

Location: Ríma A, Harpa First Level

Join design collectives Lateral North and Soluis as they present Prospect North, an exhibition which draws on Scotland’s relationship to the north to explore issues common to communities across the Arctic.

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Using a large-scale physical and digital model, the exhibition allows people to travel to Scotland through augmented and virtual reality to experience how peripheral communities have responded to various challenges and opportunities. This will lead to a conversation among participants about how holistic planning, design and technology can play a role in shaping the future of resilient communities across the Arctic and beyond. This session will be chaired by the Scottish Government’s Chief Architect. It will include presentations and a workshop mapping out where similar scenarios are found within ‘your Arctic’ and how communities can respond to them.

Virtual reality, transporting you to Scotland, is encased within Polar Bear masks, a reflection of Scotland and the Arctic. 

Participants will be invited to take part in an interactive workshop to identify potential challenges, opportunities and outcomes from throughout the Arctic region with a specific focus on separating the Arctic into four distinct regions. These micro projects could range from architectural solutions to community orientated projects, environmental sustainability initiatives and technological opportunities.

Speakers

  • Graham Hogg, Director, Lateral North
  • Tom Smith, Director, Lateral North
  • Fergus Bruce, Strategic Communications Manager, Soluis Group

Chair

  • Ian Gilzean, Chief Architect in Scotland, Scottish Government.

Essential Science for Informed Decision-Making in the Changing Arctic

Organized by the Icelandic Centre for Research (RANNÍS), the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC), and the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) (15. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 15:30-17:00

Location: Ríma B, Harpa First Level

By providing a broad scientific overview of the critical dynamics currently shaping the Arctic’s natural system, this session will serve as an important briefing to Arctic Circle Assembly attendees grappling with the many critical governance issues associated with a rapidly changing Arctic.

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Session speakers will guide audience members through current research efforts to understand the Arctic’s role in the global weather system, to predict changing sea ice patterns, and to perceive both the global and local implications of thawing permafrost and shifting hydrology patterns in the Arctic’s terrestrial cryosphere.

Speakers

  • Julienne Stroeve, Professor at University of College London; Senior Scientist, National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC): The Arctic’s changing sea ice.
  • Margareta Johansson, Executive SecretaryINTERACT; Researcher, Lund University: The Arctic’s changing terrestrial cryosphere.
  • Thomas Spengler, Professor of Meteorology, University of Bergen: The Arctic’s role in changing global climate and weather.

Chair:

  • Andrew Revkin, New York Times Blogger and Pace University Senior Fellow

Impacts of Climate Change on Ecosystems, Economies, and Northern Communities: Dialogue between Scientific and Traditional Knowledge

Organized by Institut nordique du Québec and Gouvernement du Québec (25. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 15:30-17:00

Location: Silfurberg B, Harpa Second Level

The Institut nordique du Québec and Gouvernement du Québec are organizing a breakout session aiming to spur dialogue between academic, scientific, aboriginal, and government perspectives regarding the importance of knowledge, expertise sharing, and national and international cooperation to sustainable northern development. Presentations will focus on the knowledge essential to northern development in the context of climate change.

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Opening

  • The Honourable Philippe Couillard, Premier of Québec

Introduction

  • Maryse Lassonde, Scientific Director of the Québec Nature and Technology Research Fund

Speakers 

  • Alain Bourque, Executive Director, Ouranos: Development Perspectives in a Climate Change Context.

Panel

“Which adaptation measures are unavoidable in response to climate change in the North and how can we best plan them?”

  • Louis Fortier, Scientific Director of ArcticNet, Université Laval, Québec
  • Adamie Delisle-Alaku, Vice-president, Renewable Resources, Makivik Corporation, Québec
  • Ari Kristinn Jónsson, Rector, Reykjavik University
  • Finn Danielsen, Director, Nordic Council of Ministers project ”Nordic Resource Management"
  • Moderator: Christos Sirros, Agent-General, Québec Government Office in London

Speaker

  • Paul Shrivastava, Executive Director, Future Earth: Challenges for the Future Global International Scientific Community and the Fight Against Climate Change.

Moderator

  • Yves Bégin, Vice-rector, Research and Academic Affairs, Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Québec

The Arctic: Investment Potential or Sanctuary

Organized by the Arctic Working Group in the Danish Parliament (25. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 15:30-17:00

Location: Skarðsheiði, Harpa Third Level

Come and meet members of the Arctic Working Group in the Danish Parliament, for a discussion about business development in the Arctic. The debate will be followed by a networking reception with refreshments from the North Atlantic.

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Speakers:

  • Sjúrður Skaale, Member of the Danish Parliament from the Faroe Islands, Chair of the Arctic Working Group in the Danish Parliament: The Faroes as a Service Hub.
  • Aaja Chemnitz Larsen, Member of the Danish Parliament from Greenland: Sustainable Arctic Development: The Human Dimension.
  • Magni Arge, Member Danish Parliament from the Faroe Islands: Fighting for Prosperity in the Arctic.
  • Aleqa Hammond, Member of the Danish Parliament from Greenland: Investment and Criteria, the Inuit Perspective.

Presentations will be followed by a networking reception with North Atlantic refreshments.

French Research and the Arctic: Towards a Sustainable Arctic

Organized by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Development of France (27. September 2016)

Friday, October 7, 15:30-17:00

Location: Hafnarkot, Harpa First Level

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Speakers

  • Johan Etourneau, Scientific Officer, French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS)
  • Kathy Law, Research Director, CNRS/LATMOS
  • Jean-Dominique Wahiche, Professor, Musée National d’Histoire Naturelle, France

Moderator

  • Laurent Mayet, Special Representative of France for Polar Affairs

Arctic Security: Theorizing / Thematizing Arctic Security – a Shift from Military Vacuum / Non-Security to Global Military Balance, and from Unilateral National (military) Security to Comprehensive (environmental) Security

Organized by the Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security (25. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 15:30-17:00

Location: Silfurberg A, Harpa Second Level

This session will discuss how the security nexus of the 21st century’s globalized Arctic has been reconceptualised, how the Arctic has become exceptional, and further, why the environment matters.

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The Thematic Network (TN) on Geopolitics and Security will, again, organize an international academic expert panel on “Security of the Arctic” including three breakout sessions with themes from theorizing and unilateralizing Arctic security and national security and military policies to redefining the new nexus of Arctic security. Security will be discussed theoretically and holistically from many angles and disciplinary approaches, as well as in global, national, regional and pan-Arctic contexts. Each session will accommodate 4-5 speakers from all over the Arctic region, among them are Jonathan Markowitz from the USA, Annika Nilsson from Sweden, Alexander Sergunin from Russia.

The session "Theorizing / Thematizing Arctic Security – a Shift from Military Vacuum / Non-Security to Global Military Balance, and from Unilateral National (military) Security to Comprehensive (environmental) Security" will also discuss what refugee flows in the Russian Arctic tell about the new nexus and global impacts on local scales, as well as prospects for arms control in the Arctic, and if disarmament will take us nowhere.

Speakers:

  • Lassi Heininen, Professor, University of Lapland: (Re)Conceptualizing Security Nexus of the ‘Global’ Arctic – the Environment Matters
  • Andrian Vlakhov, PhD Candidate, Research Fellow, European University at St. Petersburg: The 2014–2016 Refugee Flows in the Russian Arctic: How the Global Impacts the Local
  • Alexander Sergunin, Professor, Saint Petersburg State University: Thinking the Unthinkable: the Prospects for Arms Control and CBSM Regimes in the Arctic
  • “Contemporary Arctic Meets Global Politics: Rethinking Arctic Exceptionalism in the Age of Growing Uncertainty”:
    • Juha Käpylä, Senior Research Fellow, The Finnish Institute of International Affairs
    • Harri Mikkola, Senior Research Fellow, The Finnish Institute of International Affairs

Moderator: Auður Ingólfsdóttir, Assistant Professor, Bifröst University, Iceland

Climate Change, Species Dispersal and Fisheries

Organized by the University of Akureyri and Arctic Portal (22. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 15:30-17:00

Location: Viðey, Harpa Second Level

Climate change is poised to play a key role in species dispersal and the (re)distribution of fish stocks in the coming decades. Current projections indicate a general trend for the eventual displacement of numerous fish species towards the Polar Regions, notably the Arctic.

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Climate change is poised to play a key role in the (re-)distribution of fish stocks in the coming decades and, by extension, the location and composition of future capture fisheries. Rising sea temperatures and ocean acidification will continue to exert a strong influence over the future distribution of fish and inter-dependent species.  

The dispersal of stocks to new depths and locations accordingly presents inviting commercial possibilities for particular coastal states, albeit at the likely expense of others. Significant prospects for lucrative new fisheries are emerging in the High North, as warming seas are predicted to gradually facilitate the removal of natural climatic barriers to the colonization of Arctic waters by a growing number of species across the coming decades.

Speakers

  • Hreiðar Þór Valtýsson, Assistant Professor, School of Business and Science, University of Akureyri: Status of Arctic fisheries
  • Michaela Coote, Arctic Portal: The Potential for Divers to Protect the Marine World Through Citizen Science.
  • Captain Rick Fehst, Alaska: Perspectives of an Alaskan Fisherman
  • Hörður Sævaldsson, Assistant Professor, School of Business and Science, University of Akureyri: Challenges in the Icelandic Pelagic Sector Following Climate Changes.
  • Carey Bonnell, Head, School of Fisheries, Fisheries and Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland: Fisheries Development in the Eastern Canadian Arctic and Sub-Arctic Environment
  • Marianne Helene Rasmussen, University of Iceland: Photo-identification of Whales and Dolphins
  • Erlendur Bogason Professional diver, Strytan ehf: Underwater Videos During Breaks CHAIR: Eyjólfur Guðmundsson, Rector, University of Akureyri

Chair

  • Eyjólfur Guðmundsson, Rector, University of Akureyri

Social Impacts of Oil and Gas Activities in the Arctic – Challenges and Benefits

Organized by the Arctic Oil and Gas Research Centre, Ilisimatusarfik (University of Greenland) (6. September 2016)

Friday, October 7, 15:30-17:00

Location: Esja, Harpa Fifth Level

The development of Arctic oil is often considered controversial in terms of impacts on the surrounding environments and nearby communities. This session will focus on lessons learnt from offshore oil and gas exploration, extraction and development in Arctic countries.

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The panel will present recent findings from Arctic case studies on global, regional and local impacts of extractive policies as well as challenges and benefits experienced by practitioners in the field.

Speakers

  • Rachael Lorna Johnstone, Professor of Law, University of Akureyri: Introduction: Social Impacts of Oil and Gas Activities in the Arctic – Challenges and Benefits.
  • Anne Merrild Hansen, Professor at Ilisimatusarfik, University of Greenland: Social Impact Assessment in Oil and Gas Development: Community Experiences from Greenland and Alaska.
  • Anita L. Parlow, Fulbright-MFA Arctic Scholar at the University of Akureyri and National Energy Authority: Toward an Arctic Standard in the New North: Projected Considerations by Iceland and Norway in the Jan Mayen Offshore.

Speakers (cont'd)

  • Brigt Dale, Senior Researcher, Nordland Research Institute, Norway: The Post-Petroleum Perspective: Is There Security to be Found Beyond the Oil Ontology?
  • Natalya Novikova, Researcher, Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology, Russian Academy of Sciences: Anthropological expert review in Russia: Goals of researchers and expectations of indigenous peoples.
  • Emma Wilson, Associate, Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge University: Ethics and practice: implementing international social performance standards in Arctic extractive industry contexts.

Arctic Indigenous Peoples: Business and Economic Development in the Region

Organized by the University of Northern British Columbia (15. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 15:30-17:00

Location: Háaloft, Harpa Eighth Level

Arctic Indigenous Peoples play a very important role in the development of Arctic economies and businesses, but quite often their perspectives are not given proper consideration.

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This panel shall look at some recent developments associated with Arctic businesses, investment guidelines and Indigenous Peoples’ rights and interests both within the Arctic region and in the global fora.

Speakers:

  • Dalee Sambo Dorough, Associate Professor, University of Alaska, Iñupiat Lawyer and Member of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues: The Arctic Investment Protocol – an Indigenous Perspective and Commentary.
  • Natalia Loukacheva, Canada Research Chair in Aboriginal Governance and Law, University of Northern British Columbia: Arctic Indigenous Peoples’ Rights and Business Prospects.
  • Anders Oskal, Director, International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry, Kautokeino, Norway: Saami Reindeer herding Perspectives on Business Opportunities in the Changing Arctic.
  • Konstantin Zaikov, Dr. Maksim Zadorin, and Dr. Tatjana Troshina, Northern-Arctic Federal University, Arkhangelsk, Russian Federation: The Legal Regulation of the Russian Indigenous Peoples’ Entrepreneurship.

Innovation and Cooperation for a Safer Arctic

Organized by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) (25. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 15:30-17:00

Location: Kaldalón, Harpa First Level

The polar regions have been attracting more and more attention in recent years, fuelled by the perceptible impacts of anthropogenic climate change. Polar climate change provides new opportunities, such as shorter shipping routes between Europe and East Asia, but also new risks such as the potential for industrial accidents or emergencies in ice-covered seas.

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Here, it is argued that environmental prediction systems for the polar regions are less developed than elsewhere. There are many reasons for this situation, including the polar regions being (historically) lower priority, with less in situ observations, and with numerous local physical processes that are less well-represented by models. WMO promotes cooperative international activities enabling development of improved weather and environmental prediction services for the polar regions, on time scales from hours to seasonal.

The plan for the Breakout session is to focus on on two priority thematics:

  • The urgent need to invest in observational networks and prediction capabilities to address immediate safety requirements and climate services needs in the Arctic region, and ensuring social, economic and environmental sustainability;
  • The urgent need for greater international cooperation to support public and private sector strategic planning and enhanced global security in the face of climate change.

The session will be moderated by renowned speaker, Lucy Hockings from BBC and will involve brief interventions by each panellist, followed by an exchange with the audience.

Opening

  • Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, Chairman Arctic Circle

Speakers

  • Elena Manaenkova, Deputy Secretary General, WMO
  • Alexander Frolov, Director, RosHydroMet Mark Doherty, Head of ESA/EO Exploitation Development Division, European Space Agency
  • Mark Doherty, Head of ESA/EO Exploitation Development Division, European Space Agency
  • Andrea Tilche, Head of Unit European Commission; DG Research & Innovation
  • Michael Kingston, Maritime Lawyer of the Year 2015, Insurance Marine Trade & Energy

Chair:

  • Lucy Hockings, Presenter, BBC World News

BRICs in the Arctic: Emerging Opportunities for Collaborative Initiatives

Organized by Saint Petersburg State University, Russia (19. September 2016)

Friday, October 7, 15:30-17:00

Location: Stemma, Harpa First Level

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Speakers

  • Sergio C. Trindade, President, SE2T International, Ltd. Celma Regina Hellebust, lawyer, Honorary Vice-Consul for Brazil in Stavanger
  • Carolina A. Freire, Professor of Animal Physiology, Federal University of Paraná, Brazil
  • Alexander Sergunin, Professor of International Relations, St. Petersburg State University, Russia
  • Valery Konyshev, Professor, School of International Relations, St. Petersburg State University
  • Maria L. Lagutina, Associate Professor, Vice-head of World Politics Department, Saint Petersburg State University

Speakers (remote)

  • Zhang Yao, Senior Fellow, Shanghai Institute for International Studies (SIIS)
  • R. K. Pachauri, former head of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

Regions as Arctic Developers – Sustainable Development Through Multilateral Cooperation

Organized by Troms County Council, Norway (15. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 17:00-18:30

Location: Björtuloft, Harpa Fifth Level

How can regions play a substantive role in achieving sustainable development of the Arctic?

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The European Arctic with its approximately 4 million inhabitants and ice-free coastline is very different from what you usually associate with “Arctic.” Cutting-edge research together with favorable geographic and climatic conditions put ocean industries, space and cold climate technologies at the forefront of development. The favorable geographic conditions as well as research driven businesses puts Northern Norway in a unique position.
Cooperation between science, business and politics are important drivers for development, as well as regional and multilateral cooperation within the Barents Euro-Arctic Region and with the European Union.

This session will explore how the inhabitants of the Arctic can develop their own Arctic regions sustainably. At the same time it will highlight regional and multilateral cooperation, the potential of cross-border and cross-sectorial partnerships, and business opportunities in the European Arctic.

Speakers:

  • Cecilie Myrseth, Chair of Troms County Government: Carving out the role of regional governments in Arctic development.

  • Eirik Sivertsen, MP, Chair of the Conference of Parliamentarians of the Arctic Region: How to include regions in Arctic decision-making.
  • Oddgeir Danielsen, Director, Northern Dimension Partnership on Transport and Logistics: The Barents cooperation and infrastructure development.
  • Andreas Østhagen, Senior Fellow, the Artic Institute; PhD-student, University of British Columbia: The EU and the Arctic.
  • Anne Husebekk, Rector, UiT – The Arctic University of Norway: Knowledge and cooperation as drivers for development.
  • Jan Gunnar Winther, Director, Norwegian Polar Institute: The potential of marine resources and the role of regions, businesses and multilateral cooperation
  • Anu Fredrikson, Director, Arctic Economic Council: Sustainable business development.

Chair:

  • Arne O. Holm, Executive Editor, High North News

The Potential For Geothermal In The Arctic

Organized by the Canadian Geothermal Energy Association CanGea (16. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 17:00-18:30

Location: Eyri, Harpa Second Level

Iceland’s capacity and technology of tapping into geothermal resources for domestic heating has replaced expensive fossil fuel imports for heating Iceland. 

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Geothermal plays a tremendously important role in Iceland´s energy supply and has transformed the country´s economy while simultaneously reducing its CO2 emissions. The direct use of geothermal for heating and food production has a strong potential in Canada´s northern territories as well as in Alaska. Other direct uses such as aquaculture, horticultures, food processing and advanced chemistry are also possibilities. Utilisation of geothermal would provide these Arctic areas with a clean renewable energy source and replacing inefficient and polluting diesel-powered generators that are currently used by many off-the-grid communities. This session will cover direct-use of geothermal for the following: the remote area of Fljót in Northern Iceland, the potential for geothermal direct in Canada´s 175 Aboriginal and Northern off-grid communities, and how geothermal could transform renewable energy access and energy security in Alaska´s remote communities

Speakers:

  • Alison Thompson, Chair & Co-Founder, CanGEA: Canada’s 175 Aboriginal and Northern Off-Grid Communities: Geothermal Power, Heat, Greenhouses and Jobs Opportunities.
  • George Roe, Adjunct Research Professor, University of Alaska at Fairbanks; Program Manager, Arctic Remote Energy Networks Academy (ARENA), UAF
  • Magnús Ólafsson, Senior Geochemist and Project Manager, ÍSOR, Iceland GeoSurvey: Exploration and Sustainable, Cascaded Use of Geothermal in Remote Areas in Iceland

Chair:

  • Ágústa Ýr Þorbergsdóttir, Director at NAVIGO ehf.

Fulbright in the Arctic – Meeting Challenges of Sustainability, Human Development and Utilization

Organized by the Iceland-US Fulbright Commission in cooperation with the US State Department‘s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and the National Science Foundation (16. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 17:00-18:30

Location: Hafnarkot, Harpa First Level

The panel consists of scholars from different fields, who are doing research in the Arctic through Fulbright. 

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They will discuss their research, pose questions and engage in a multidisciplinary dialogue on the Arctic, including challenges and opportunities the region is facing. Questions posed will include how we can utilize the Arctic responsibly and make it a model for other areas, with respect for life, sustainability and international law. The panel will engage with the audience, inviting questions and comments.

Speakers:

  • Erica Hill, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Chair of Social Sciences, University of Alaska Southeast; Fulbright-NSF Arctic Research Scholar at the University of Iceland: The Archaeology of Humans, Animals and Landscapes in Iceland and Alaska.
  • Stephanie Grocke, Postdoctoral Researcher, Geology, Smithsonian Institution; Fulbright-NSF Arctic Research Scholar at the University of Iceland: Blasting Through Time: Past & Future Gas Emissions Emitted from Icelandic Volcanoes
  • Robert Zierenberg, Professor of Geology, University of California, Davis; Fulbright-NSF Arctic Research Scholar at the University of Iceland: Using Magma as a Low-Carbon Energy Source.
  • Bjarni Magnússon, Associate Professor of Law, Reykjavik University; Fulbright Arctic Initiative Scholar: The United States Entitlement to the Continental Shelf beyond 200 Nautical Miles.
  • Anita Parlow, Esq., recently Team Lead to the Woodrow Wilson Polar Initiative’s Polar Code Roundtable, International law; Fulbright-MFA Arctic Scholar at the University of Akureyri, University of Iceland and National Energy Authority, Iceland: Sustainable & Collaborative Practices in Arctic Offshore Petroleum Development.
  • Anne Merrild Hansen, Professor at Ilisimatusarfik, University of Greenland; Fulbright Arctic Initiative Scholar: Social Impacts of Oil Development in the North American Arctic.
  • Gwen Holdmann, Director of the Alaska Center for Energy and Power, Fulbright Arctic Initiative Scholar: How Local Energy Development can Support Sustainable Business Ecosystems.
  • Susan Chatwood, Director, Institute for Circumpolar Health Research, Assistant Professor, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Fulbright Arctic Initiative Scholar: Health System Performance in Circumpolar Regions.
  • Greg Poelzer, Professor, School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan; Founding Director, International Centre for Northern Governance and Development; Fulbright Arctic Initiative Scholar: Sovereign Wealth Funds and Sustainable Development in Arctic and Sub-Arctic Communities.

Chair:

  • Belinda Theriault, Executive Director, Fulbright Commission Iceland

Polar Law: Global Influences On Polar Governance

Organized by the University of Akureyri (15. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 17:00-18:30

Location: Main Hall, Þjóðmenningarhúsið (National Centre for Cultural Heritage)

This session examines the interplay between global institutions and the Arctic.

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It begins with an examination of the role of the United Nations and selected subsidiary bodies on Polar governance. The rights of indigenous peoples are then addressed. First is an assessment of the implementation of land rights according to ILO Convention 169 in Norwegian law. This is followed by an evaluation of the rights of Sámi children under three key international instruments.

Speakers:

  • Bertrand Ramcharan, former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights: UN Protection of the Polar Regions.
  • Øyvind Ravna, Professor of Law, Arctic University of Norway in Tromsø: Is Norway's arrangement with an investigating commission and a land tribunal suited to fulfill its obligations under ILO 169 to the Sámi?
  • Tanja Joona, Senior Researcher, University of Lapland: The Rights of Sámi Children in the context of Subjectivity and Identity with special reference to ILO Convention No. 169, the Draft Nordic Saami Convention and UNDRIP.

Chair: 

  • Guðmundur Alfreðsson, Professor, University of Akureyri; China University of Political Science and Law

Policymaking in the Arctic

Organized by the West Nordic Council (25. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 17:00-18:30

Location: Ríma B, Harpa First Level

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Speakers

  • Unnur Brá Konráðsdóttir, President of the West Nordic Council, Member of the Icelandic Parliament
  • Dalee Sambo Dorough, Chairperson, United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Alaska Anchorage
  • Chandrika Nath, Acting Director, Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology, British Parliament

Resource Dynamics

Organized by the GlobalArctic Project and the Northern Research Forum (NRF) (25. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 17:00-18:30

Location: Silfurberg A, Harpa Second Level

The Arctic holds significant deposits of both hydrocarbons (gas, oil and coal) and precious minerals, all of which the global economy desperately needs in order to pursue its industrial development path.

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Both deposits will become increasingly accessible thanks to global warming. In addition, such global warming will also lead to fish migrating North, making the Arctic an attractive fishing ground. This breakout session will try to assess the likely dynamics of Arctic resources becoming more accessible as the combined result of the following:

  1. Global warming
  2. Global demand for such resources
  3. Costs of their commercial exploitation
  4. Political conditions allowing for this to happen

Speakers:

  • Gerald Zojer, PhD Candidate, University of Lapland: Arctic Governance Under the Influence of a Global Fossil-Industrial Way of Life
  • Florian Vidal, PhD Candidate, University of Paris Descartes: Energy Nexus and Climate Change in the Arctic
  • Erica M. Dingman, Senior Fellow, World Policy Institute; Director, Arctic in Context Initiative: Into the Future: The Confluence of Arctic Warming and Energy Demand
  • Hanna Lempinen, Researcher, PhD Candidate, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Lapland, Finland: (Human) Security or (Social) Sustainability? - Perspectives to and from the Arctic Energyscape
  • Teemu Palosaari, Post-doctoral Researcher, Tampere Peace Research Institute TAPRI, University of Tampere, Finland: The Arctic Paradox (and how to solve it). Oil, Gas and Climate Change Ethics in the Arctic

Chair

Matthias Finger, Professor, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale Lausanne (EPFL)

The Arctic Ocean – Icelandic Solutions

Organized by Hafið, the Icelandic Center of Excellence for Sustainable use and Conservation of the Ocean (16. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 17:00-18:30

Location: Skarðsheiði, Harpa Third Level

Hafið is a roundtable for private and public entities in ocean related operations. Hafið's main focus is innovation and policy for the benefit of the ocean.

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This is done through roundtable discussions, collaborative projects and considerable outreach to related parties. In this breakout session, Hafið will present both results of collaborative projects and innovative solutions from members. Technological solutions are the main topic here, wrapping up with a talk on the importance of cross border cooperation in order to fast-track environmental solutions for the ocean.

Speakers:

  • Sigríður Ragna Sverrisdóttir, General manager, Hafið
  • Þorsteinn Svanur Jónsson, Manager of Business Development, ARK Technology
  • Davíð Lúðvíksson, Director – Strategy and innovation, The Federation of Icelandic Industries
  • Einar Skaftason, Trawl designer, Hampiðjan

Communication and Coordination Network in the Arctic

Organized by Isavia (28. September 2016)

Friday, October 7, 17:00-18:30

Location: Akrafjall, Harpa Fourth Level

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Speakers

  • Ásgeir Pálsson, Director of Air Navigation Services, Isavia
  • Lars H. Hansen, Captain in the Royal Danish Navy representing the Commander in Chief, Joint Arctic Command

Rethinking Shared Interests in Arctic Oil and Gas – Can We Actually Manage More Effectively?

Organized by Stony Brook University (16. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 17:00-18:30

Location: Esja, Harpa Fifth Level

Recognizing the complex nature of governance and development in sensitive ecosystems, like the Arctic, this brainstorming session returns to the Arctic Circle Conference to explore the topic of shared interests in Arctic oil and gas. 

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A number of overarching thrusts frame this discussion. What interests are common to different sectors, regions, and stakeholders? Could interests and resources actually be effectively managed? If so, what practices, authorities, and policies should be involved? This panel builds on insights from previous Arctic Circle panels, aiming to tackle the changing conditions and paths for solutions. Experts from government, industry, academia, science, and NGOs will participate.

Panelists

  • Monica Ell-Kanayuk, Deputy Premier, Government of Nunavut
  • Jóhann Sigurjónsson, Special Envoy on Ocean Affairs, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Iceland
  • Tero Vauraste, President and CEO, Arctia Ltd; Vice-Chair, Arctic Economic Council
  • Fran Ulmer, Chair, United States Arctic Research Commission; Special Advisor to the U.S. Department of State on Arctic Science and Policy
  • Heiðar Guðjonsson, Chairman of the Board, Eykon Energy
  • Guðni Jóhannesson, Director General, National Energy Authority of Iceland
  • Bill Moomaw, Research Professor and Co-director, Global Development and Environment Institute, Tufts University; Chief Science Officer, Earthwatch Institute
  • Alexander Vylegzhanin, Professor and Director, International Law Programme, Moscow State Institute of International Relations
  • Michael Kingston, Maritime Lawyer, DWF Law
  • Brigt Dale, Senior Researcher, Nordland Research Institute
  • Nils Andreassen, Project Manager, Institute of the North

Chair

  • Kathleen Araújo, Assistant Professor, Stony Brook University, and Researcher, Brookhaven National Laboratory

Blue Growth in the Arctic; How to Move Forward.

Organized by the University of Iceland, Oslo University and the Stockholm Resilience Center (24. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 17:00-18:30

Location: Háaloft, Harpa Eighth Level

International governance of aquatic resource use is increasingly facilitated around a novel term and concept - ‘blue growth’.  

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The FAO defines blue growth as: “as economic growth and social development emanating from living resources of the oceans and inland waters and from related activities in the coastal zones, which minimize environmental degradation, biodiversity loss and unsustainable use of living aquatic resources.” An international and interdisciplinary team of researchers is currently exploring various perspectives linked to this concept and this session will bring together a series of talks that all focus on better understanding the definition, dynamics, and mechanisms of blue growth in the context of the Arctic. Specifically, the session will i) clarifying what blue growth is ii) characterize some of the dynamics and mechanics of blue growth and iii) and describe its significance to current ocean governance.  The session will end with a panel discussion.

Speakers:

  • Anne Marie Eikeset CEES, University of Oslo: Green Growth Based on Marine Resources: an Introduction to the GreenMAR Project
  • Simon A. Levin, Professor Princeton University (video message)
  • Thorsten Blenckner, Stockholm Resilience Center: Blue Growth in the context of Arctic Resilience.
  • Susa Niiranen, Stockholm Resilience Center: Global Connectivity and Cross-Scale Interactions Create Uncertainty for Blue Growth of Arctic Fisheries
  • Matilda Valman, Post-doctoral Researcher, Stockholm Resilience Center: A sea of many colours. Comparing ideas and practices of Blue growth
  • Brynhildur Davidsdottir, Professor Environment and Natural Resources, University of Iceland: Governance strategy for Blue Growth; Challenges and Opportunities – the Road Forward

Chair

  • Nils Christian Stenseth, Professor CEES University of Oslo.

Human Face of Climate Change in the Arctic: Insiders' and Outsiders' Perspectives

Organized by the Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (16. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 17:00-18:30

Location: Kaldalón, Harpa First Level

Over the past century, all communities of the Far North have experienced previously unknown rates of social, cultural, economic and political changes, many of them imposed from the outside. 

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Ongoing climate change, whose impacts are strongly felt in higher latitudes, adds another powerful dimension to these transformations. This session aims at fostering the dialogue between those who live through and must adapt to the climate-related changes, and those who witness and study them, generally from the outside. It will feature extracts from the documentary film “Sila and the Gatekeepers of the Arctic“, followed by a discussion with its director and producer. Other discussants on the panel will provide additional insights in the changing livelihoods, socioeconomic conditions, and future perspectives of Indigenous peoples of the Arctic. A particular focus will be on how contemporary art creates awareness of the impacts of climate change.

Speakers:

  • Corina Gamma, Film director and producer: the Relationship Between People and their Environment
  • Aqqaluk Lynge, Consultant, Head of the Inuit Human Rights Centre (Inuit Circumpolar Council, Greenland); former Chair of ICC: Sharing of Information and Knowledge - the Inuit Approach: Indigenous Rights in the Arctic
  • Martha Cerny, Curator, Cerny Inuit Collection, Berne-Switzerland: Contemporary Art and Awareness about Climate Change

Chair:

  • Yvon Csonka, Professor of Anthropology

Towards a Carbon-neutral Approach in the Arctic

Organized by the University of Akureyri, Iceland, Akureyri Clean Tech, Iceland, and the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) Working Group of the Arctic Council (23. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 17:00-18:30

Location: Ríma A, Harpa First Level

The Arctic Circle has a focus on climate change, understanding what is happening, potential impacts and sustainable development. In the aftermath of the Paris climate change agreement it is timely to consider how this event might become carbon neutral. 

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This session consist of a series of short presentations addressing what is meant by becoming “carbon neutral”, how this might be achieved and why it is essential. Speakers from a variety of sectors e.g. municipalities, Government Ministries, Universities and regional organizations provide case studies on how their respective bodices are striving to become carbon neutral. The session will conclude with a question and answer session focused on discussing how events such (as the Arctic Circle) and institutions can become carbon neutral.

Speakers

  • Sigurður Ingi Friðleifsson, Manager, the Energy Agency of Iceland: Carbon Emissions and Carbon Neutrality.
  • Brynhildur Bjarnadóttir, Assistant Professor, University of Akureyri: Carbon Sequestration – Possibilities in the Arctic.
  • Hans Jörgen Koch, CEO, Nordic Council of Ministers: A Regional Approach to Carbon Neutrality.
  • Hugi Ólafsson, Director, Ministry for the Environment and Natural Resources, Iceland: Iceland; Climate and Policies.
  • Guðmundur Haukur Sigurðsson, Manager, Akureyri CleanTech: Akureyri – Towards a Carbon-neutral Northern Municipality.
  • Albertína Friðbjörg Elíasdóttir, Manager, Eimur: Encouraging Increased Sustainability in the Arctic with Better Utilization of Resources.
  • Eyjólfur Guðmundsson, Rector, University of Akureyri: University of Akureyri: The First Carbon-neutral University in the Arctic.
  • Brynhildur Pétursdóttir, Member of Parliament: Summary – Why is the Arctic Circle Event not Carbon Neutral?

The Future of Arctic Shipping Under IPCC Climate Scenarios

Organized by EU-PolarNet and ICE-ARC (23. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 17:00-18:30

Location: Sæbjörg S&R Vessel

Arctic sea ice is expected to have melted enough to open up shipping lanes for four months of the year by the middle of the century, as stated in the current IPCC report.

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These new conditions will bring opportunities for Arctic shipping but also challenges for the environment, local communities or raise safety issues due to missing search and rescue facilities. European shipping companies have already used the Northern Sea Route in the last years to transporting cargo from Europe to East Asia and vice versa. There is also growing interest by the tourism industry in using Arctic waters for carrying tourists to Arctic sites along the Northwest and the Northeast Passage.
The session organised by the EU-projects ICE-ARC and EU-PolarNet will address the environmental, social and economic impacts of increased shipping in Arctic waters in relation to different IPCC scenarios and propose necessary actions for developing sustainable Arctic shipping.

Speakers:

  • Andrea Tilche, Head of the Climate Action and Earth Observation Unit, Directorate General for Research and Innovation, European Commission: Sustainable Development in the Arctic – the New Arctic Policy.
  • Kathrin Riemann-Campe, Post-doctoral Scientist, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Alfred Wegener Institute: IPCC AR5: Projections of Arctic Sea Ice Change.
  • Johan Gille, Senior Consultant, ECORYS: Current Business Restrictions and Future Opportunities for Arctic Shipping.
  • Kathy Law, Director of Research, Observations Spatiales (LATMOS), Laboratoire Atmosphères, Milieux: Current and Future Impacts of Pollution from Arctic Shipping.
  • Lawson Brigham, Distinguished Professor of Geography & Arctic Policy, University of Alaska Fairbanks: The IMO Polar Code and Future Arctic Marine Operations.
  • Jeremy Wilkinson, Sea Ice Physicist, British Antarctic Survey: Conclusions and Recommendations for Necessary Actions from an ICE-ARC Perspective
  • Björn Dahlbäck, Director General, Swedish Polar Research Secretariat: Conclusions and Recommendations for Necessary Actions from an EU-PolarNet Perspective.
  • Paolo Ruti, Chief, World Weather Research Programme, World Meteorological Organization: A WMO Research Contribution to Future Arctic: the Year Of Polar Prediction.

China-Iceland Joint Aurora Observatory (Ciao) and its Scientific Cooperation

Organized by The Polar Research Institute of China (PRIC) and the Icelandic Centre for Research (RANNÍS) (27. September 2016)

Friday, October 7, 17:00-18:30

Location: Stemma, Harpa First Level

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Chairs

  • Hallgrímur Jónasson, Director, RANNÍS
  • Zhu Jiangang, Deputy Director, PRIC

Speakers

  • Yang Huigen, Director General, PRIC
  • Hu Hongqiao, Head of Atmosphere and Space Physics Division, PRIC
  • Gunnlaugur Björnsson, Research Scientist, Science Institute, University of Iceland
  • Thorsteinn Gunnarsson, Senior Adviser, RANNÍS
  • Halldór Jóhannsson, Director, Arctic Portal
  • Embla Eir Oddsdóttir, Director, Icelandic Arctic Cooperation Network

Whose Arctic Security? Broadening the Security Agenda in the Arctic Region.

Organized by the Hull Marine and Maritime Institute (University of Hull, UK) (15. August 2016)

Friday, October 7, 17:00-18:30

Location: Silfurberg B, Harpa Second Level

The ‘Whose Arctic Security?’ breakout session (2016) will build upon last year’s session entitled ‘Security Concerns in the Arctic’. This was a successful and energetic session with over sixty delegates in attendance. 

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Expanding upon a number of the concerns and issues raised last year, we seek to broaden the agenda of security and highlight that ‘security’ should not just be discussed in terms of ‘states, militaries and power’. Instead, when discussing the Arctic region, security should be broadly conceived. Thus, this panel will not only touch upon great power politics, military power, environmental security and the Arctic, but will also broaden out to discuss historical, cultural and literary perceptions of Arctic security.

    Speakers:

    • James I. Rogers, Associate Lecturer in International Politics, University of York: Culture, Strategy and Security.
    • Caroline Kennedy, Professor of War Studies, Director of the Hull Maritime and Marine Institute: Russia, India and the Arctic.
    • Michele Olivier, Reader, School of Politics, Philosophy and International Relations, University of Hull: Indigenous Securities and Insecurities: Environmental Security & Sustainable Development.
    • Emma Butcher, AHRC-funded Doctoral Candidate in English Literature, University of Hull: Arctic Security in the Literary and Cultural Imagination.
    • Tom Arnbom, Senior Conservation Officer, WWF Sweden: Why We Need a Sustainable Blue Economy in the Arctic.

    How to Connect with Arctic Research Across Boundaries

    Organized by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (25. August 2016)

    Saturday, October 8, 14:30-15:30

    Location: Háaloft, Harpa Eighth Level

    Arctic research spans disciplinary, institutional, national, and sector boundaries in pursuit of improved understanding and decision making for this vital region.  In order to work effectively across these boundaries, it is important to focus on effective communication, coordination, and collaboration. 

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    This interactive session will explore what is being done, and what could be done, to bridge boundaries and advance research. For example, ARCUS is an international organization that connects across boundaries through the Sea Ice Prediction Network, Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH), and PolarTREC programs, among others.  The session is designed to inform those engaged in research, decision-makers interested in a more effective research enterprise, and others interested in better understanding of the Arctic.

    Speakers:

    • Robert Rich, Executive Director, Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S.: Connecting Arctic Research Across Boundaries
    • Fran Ulmer, Chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission: Setting Arctic Research Priorities within the U.S.
    • Maribeth S. Murray, Executive Director, Arctic Institute of North America and Professor of Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Calgary: A Binational Organization Advancing Arctic Research
    • Volker Rachold, Executive Secretary of the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC): Identifying Priorities for International Arctic Research
    • Peter Schmidt Mikkelsen, Lead Coordinator of Isaaffik Arctic Gateway: Connecting Arctic Research, Education, Consultancy and Logistics (within the Kingdom of Denmark)

    Arctic Ocean Oil and Gas Exploration and Legal Liability

    Organized by the University of Iceland and the University of Akureyri (24. August 2016)

    Saturday, October 8, 14:30-15:30

    Location: Akrafjall, Harpa Fourth Level

    Drilling for hydrocarbons in the Arctic carries significant environmental risks. 

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    Small States such as Iceland or a future independent Greenland that license hazardous activities such as offshore hydrocarbon activities are unlikely to be in a position to make full reparation in the event of a major environmental disaster.  This panel focus on i) how could such states make reparation in such cases in the context with limitations and impact on human rights ii) Design considerations for a liability regime reviewing Canada’s new regime in light of these considerations and iii) Insurance perspective on Arctic Ocean Oil and Gas exploration projects.

    Chair:

    • Aðalheiður Jóhannsdóttir, Professor of Law and Head of the Faculty of Law, University of Iceland

    Speakers:

    • Rachael Lorna Johnstone, Professor of Law at University of Akureyri: Hazardous Activities, Small States and the Risk of Reparation
    • Nigel Bankes, Professor of Law at the University of Calgary: Design Considerations for a Liability and Financial Assurance Regime: Canada
    • Lára Jóhannsdóttir, Assistant Professor, Environment and Natural Resources. University of Iceland: Insurance perspective on Arctic Ocean Oil and Gas exploration projects

    Arctic Societies of Well-being

    Organized by the University of Iceland (26. August 2016)

    Saturday, October 8, 14:30-15:30

    Location: Esja, Harpa Fifth Level

    In this session, suggested sustainable well-being indicators that have been proposed will be presented. Light will be cast on on natural resource exploitation and opportunities for young people having hope for the future.

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    During the 20th century, gross domestic product (GDP) became the key parameter to distinguish successful countries from unsuccessful ones, determining global economic policies and also status. This has led us to the global warming predicament we are in now. There is therefore a need to foster a development model focusing on human and ecological wellbeing, rather than narrowly defined economic output.

    Facilitated discussion will be run on the importance a new development paradigm, where the wellbeing of people and the environment of the Arctic are at the forefront. The outcome of the discussion will be summarized and sent out to the participants, so that they can use the knowledge gained back home in their communities.

    Facilitators:

    • Kristin Vala Ragnarsdottir, Professor of Sustainability Science, University of Iceland
    • Alan AtKisson, President & CEO, AtKisson Group, Sweden

      Collaboration and Partnership: The Future of Arctic News Media

      Organized by Alaska Dispatch News (26. September 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 14:30-15:30

      Location: Eyri, Harpa Second Level

      The Arctic presents unique challenges for news organizations seeking to cover it, but also unprecedented opportunities for innovation and collaboration.

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      In this session, representatives from several circumpolar news organizations will discuss their approach to news coverage—and unveil an exciting new Arctic media partnership. This interactive session will also provide a forum for discussion among participants and attendees about how important Arctic stories are covered and how to pitch story ideas and opinion pieces.

      Panelists

      • Arne Holm, Editor-in-Chief, High North News
      • Thomas Nilsen, Editor, The Independent Barents Observer
      • Atle Staalesen, General Director, The Independent Barents Observer
      • Kevin McGwin, Journalist, The Arctic Journal
      • Krestia DeGeorge, News Editor, Alaska Dispatch News

      Moderator

      • Alice Rogoff, Publisher, Alaska Dispatch News

      Renewable Energy Development in the Arctic: Circumpolar Projects that Advance Knowledge Sharing

      Organized by the Institute of the North (15. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 14:30-15:30

      Location: Main Hall, Þjóðmenningarhúsið (National Centre for Cultural Heritage)

      The Arctic region as a whole is a global leader in renewable energy development, however most development has occurred at the national or regional level with little pan-Arctic engagement. 

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      As a result, stakeholders from around the Arctic have indicated a need to share scientific data, best practices, research results, and local knowledge to encourage adoption of renewable energy and energy efficiency strategies that take advantage of the lessons learned and expertise gained across the region. A number of high-level projects are underway that will promote science-based decision making as well as encourage clean energy development. This session highlights some of these initiatives led by partners from the Arctic Council’s Sustainable Development Working Group, Arctic Fulbright Initiative program, Institute of the North, Alaska Center for Energy and Power, and the World Wildlife Fund. These projects are designed to 1) create an online pan-Arctic atlas of renewable energy resources and development and complimentary tool for knowledge sharing; 2) develop a guide of best practices for remote community renewable energy integration and efficiency; and 3) build training and knowledge-sharing opportunities to increase capacity within Arctic regions, with a special emphasis on the unique challenges of remote energy systems in off-grid communities. 

      Speakers

      • Greg Poelzer, Executive Chair of ICNGD;  Professor in the School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan: Renewable and Remote Energy Development in the Arctic: An Arctic Fulbright Initiative.
      • George Roe, Adjunct Research Professor, University of Alaska at Fairbanks; Program Manager, Arctic Remote Energy Networks Academy (ARENA), UAF: An SDWG Project – Arctic Remote Energy Network Academy.
      • Nils Andreassen, Project Manager, Institute of the North: Arctic Renewable Energy Atlas: An SDWG Project for Renewable Energy Data Visualization
      • Anne Mette Erlandsson Christiansen, Renewable Energy Program Director, WWF Sweden: Supporting Renewable Energy Development in Alaska, Greenland, Canada and Russia: A Project of WWF.

      Chair:

      • Nils Andreassen, Executive Director, Institute of the North

      Sensing the Arctic: Autonomous and Aubmersible Vehicles – Results, Opportunities and Good Governance

      Organized by the UK Arctic Office (funded by the Natural Environment Research Council) (24. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 14:30-15:30

      Location: Norðurljós, Harpa Second Level

      The harshness of the Arctic environment can make research access to its seas and remote locations difficult. But rapid innovative technological development is increasingly enabling remotely operated and autonomous vehicles to make observations in the most challenging of environments. How do we make the best and safest use of this technology, whilst getting the right governance in place?

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      Speakers will present the latest in autonomous technology; discuss the value of remote-access data and outline recent findings; show how to train the next generation of developers and operators; and consider the best practice in governance systems.

      This breakout session brings together practitioners, designers, researchers and developers, along with those looking at current and future regulatory challenges. It is relevant to a wide range of people interested in the present and future of autonomous and submersible vehicles in the Arctic, their operation and in developing innovative research.

      Chair:

      • Henry Burgess, Head, Arctic Office, Natural Environment Research Council, UK

      Speakers:

      • Mark Inall, Director, Scottish Alliance for Geoscience, Environment and Society, Scottish Association for Maritime Science (SAMS)
      • Alberto Naveira, Director, Next Generation Unmanned Systems Science, University of Southampton: Training the next generation of environmental scientists in the use of Smart and Autonomous Observing Systems
      • Charlotte Marcinko, Research Scientist, University of Southampton: Insights into Arctic Oceanography from Submarine Sensors
      • Maaten Furlong, Head, Marine Autonomous & Robotic Systems Group, National Oceanography Centre

      The Central Highland: Brand Capital of Icelandic Nature

      Organized by Hálendið Iceland National Park in cooperation with the Icelandic Environment Association and Iceland Nature Conservation Association (16. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 14:30-15:30

      Location: Ríma B, Harpa First Level

      Conservation of the Icelandic Central Highland is of great importance for the Arctic region. It is considered one of the greatest wilderness areas still remaining in Europe. 

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      The aesthetic natural variety is unique: Glaciers, glacial rivers, glacially sculpted landscapes, barren plateaus with wide horizon and an endless view, colorful geothermal areas, natural freshwater springs, lava fields, steep and odd shaped mountains and mountain ridges including unique tuff ridges, permafrost areas, and beautifully colored tundra vegetation.

      The breakout session will touch on the following topics that highlight the importance of conserving the unparalleled characteristics of the Icelandic Central Highland in relation to its Arctic location and its importance as such:

      • The natural value and the multiple natural phenomena of the area.
      • The link between sustainable tourism and conservation in the area.
      • How the pure image of the area benefits Iceland’s economy and society at large as the brand capital of Icelandic nature.

      Speakers: 

      • Þóra Ellen Þórhallsdóttir, Professor of Botany, University of Iceland; Chairperson of the Institute of Life and Environmental Sciences: Why All the Fuss? Biological Values in the Central Highland
      • Peter Prokosch, Founder and Chairman of the Board, Linking Tourism & Conservation (LT&C): The Icelandic Highlands - an Arctic Wilderness
      • Oliver Luckett, CEO, Revilo Park: The Brand of Iceland and its Connection to Nature and Sustainability

      Korea and the Arctic

      Organized by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries of the Republic of Korea, Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI), Korea Maritime Institute (KMI), and the National Institute of Ecology (NIE) (24. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 14:30-15:30

      Location: Skarðsheiði, Harpa Third Level

      This breakout session will consist of presentations on various aspects – international cooperation, scientific research, business opportunities and more – of the Republic of Korea’s activities in the Arctic.

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      In addition to examining Korea’s Arctic policy through a range of activities in different fields, this session aims to diversify the perspectives represented at the Arctic Circle Assembly by including non-Arctic regions in Arctic dialogue.

      Speakers

      • Kim Chan-Woo, Ambassador for Arctic Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs: Korea’s Contribution to a Sustainable Arctic Future.
      • Hyunkyo Seo, Director, KOPRI-NPI (Norwegian Polar Institute) Cooperative Polar Research Centre: Korea's Scientific Research Activities in the Arctic and Future Plans in the Arctic.
      • Kim Jong Deog, Director General, Korea Maritime Institute (KMI): Korea's Partnership Enhancement with Working Groups and TFs of the Arctic Council.
      • Kang Sung-Ryong, Senior Researcher, National Institute of Ecology (NIE): Korea’s Contribution to the Arctic Migratory Birds Initiative (AMBI) of the Arctic Council.

      Singapore and the Arctic: Partnership Between Academia and Business Through Research & Innovation

      Organized by Keppel Offshore & Marine (26. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 14:30-15:30

      Location: Stemma, Harpa First Level

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      Speakers:

      • Yeong Wai Seng, Senior Business Development Manager, Keppel Singmarine: Sustainable Living and Development for Local Communities.
      • Chow Yean Khow, Professor, Executive Director, Keppel-NUS Corporate Laboratory: Partnership among Academia, Industry and Government for Arctic Research
      • Peter Noble, Technology Consultant, Keppel Offshore & Marine Technology Centre: Technology Research Requirements to Support Sustainable and  Environmentally Acceptable Developments in the Arctic.
      • Anis Hussain, General Manager, Marine Technology Development and Project Director/Deepwater Technology, KOMtechBuilding Capability through Innovation: Experiences in Technology Development.

      Arctic Rotary Connections: Rotary, It’s about Life!

      Organized by Rotary International (15. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 14:30-15:30

      Location: Sæbjörg S&R Vessel

      Join us with our third Rotary Breakout session. Rotary is about community, local and world wide. We are the Rotarians of the Arctic, working to build our northern neighborhood. We live, work and play in the Arctic, our home. And, we are a service non-profit organization.

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      During this breakout we will join together to discuss this year, “what's next”? We all see the the changes in nature, the weather and even the economy up here. Let’s discuss what these changes mean now, and for our future. Let’s build our northern neighborhood. All are welcome, Rotarians, residents of the north, all interested in the Arctic and what is next! How are we facing these changes? Rotary, It’s about life! (And Rotarians, this counts as a make-up!)

      Speakers:

      • Joseph Davis, Vice President, ConsultNorth; Anchorage Rotary Club
      • Sandra Medearis, Nome Rotary Club
      • Elizabeth Shea, Alaska Nanuuq Commission; Chair for the New Generation Committee for Anchorage Downtown Rotary

      Book Launch: Antarctica, the Battle for the Seventh Continent

      Book by Doaa Abdel-Motaal (15. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 14:30-15:30

      Location: Hafnarkot, Harpa First Level

      This session launches the book Antarctica, The Battle for the Seventh Continent, written by Doaa Abdel-Motaal, and published by Praeger in September 2016.

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      The book argues that the Antarctic Treaty System needs to be dismantled and Antarctica divided up based on the Svalbard model of governance.  The ban on mining in the Antarctic Treaty System comes up for review in 2048, and with the rapidly warming Antarctic Peninsula that now enjoys the same climate as Greenland, the book discusses the need to take pre-emptive action in dividing up the continent rather than await disorderly outcomes. The occupation of Antarctica, the exploitation of its mineral resources, and the transfer of climate refugees to the continent are amongst the key themes of the book.  Of the book, the former Prime Minister of Greenland, Aleqa Hammond has written: "A thought-provoking book on the potential occupation of the seventh continent. In it, I have sent a message to the future population of Antarctica: 'Decide your own destiny and your own future… You will have your own life, you will live there, and you should be the ones to decide.'

      Author:

      • Doaa Abdel-Motaal, Author

      Discussants:

      • Aleqa Hammond, Former Prime Minister of Greenland and Member of Danish Parliament 
      • Sven Olof Lindblad, CEO, Lindblad Expeditions

      Moderator:

      • Martin Breum, Journalist and author

      Arctic Council: Scorecard for Conservation Results

      Organized by the WWF Arctic Programme (26. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 14:30-15:30

      Location: Kaldalón, Harpa First Level

      Over the course of 20 years of circumpolar cooperation, the Arctic Council (AC) has delivered multiple landmark assessments of the current and likely future state of the Arctic. These consensually negotiated documents were often accompanied by nonbinding policy recommendations that were approved by biennial ministerial meetings.

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      WWF is producing an Arctic Council Conservation Scorecard that provides a snapshot of the status of implementation of Arctic Council direction (ministerial decisions contained in ministerial declarations, policy recommendations, guidelines, framework plans, and agreements).

      The scorecard evaluates implementation progress from the Salekhard ministerial meeting (2006) to the Kiruna ministerial meeting (2013). It looks at the extent to which:

      • The Arctic States implemented endorsed Arctic Council direction within their respective national realms
      • The Arctic Council delivered agreed upon commitments through its own work

      The scorecard will monitor progress, highlight successful progress, and the speed of implementation.

      Speakers

      • Marc-André Dubois, Advisor, External Relations, WWF Arctic Programme: WWF Scorecard Methodology.
      • Maya Gold, Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, Canada
      • Arne Riedel, LLM, Rechtsanwalt (Lawyer); Fellow, Coordinator Arctic, Ecologic Institute: Policy in progress?
      • Alexander Sergunin, Professor, Saint-Petersburg State University

      Chair

      • Alexander Shestakov, Director, WWF Arctic Programme

      More Information

      Arctic University Cities

      Organized by the Centre for Arctic Policy Studies (CAPS) at University of Iceland and the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø (25. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 14:30-15:30

      Location: Ríma A, Harpa First Level

      Cities play a crucial role in fighting climate change given the fact that urban activity accounts for around 80% of global energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

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      In order to meet commitments made by city leaders during and after the twenty-first session of the Conference of the Parties (COP), various non-state actors need to be brought together in a sharing of knowledge, experiences and best practices to develop and implement innovative solutions, with representatives from the authorities, academia and business. In this perspective, Arctic university cities make an interesting case as they are often isolated, dependent on natural resources and particularly vulnerable to the impact of climate change. 

      Speakers

      • Mara Kimmel, Senior Fellow at the Institute of the North, Alaska
      • Rasmus Gjedssø Bertelsen, Professor of Northern Studies and Barents Chair in Politics, University of Tromsø, the Arctic University of Norway (UiT)

      Panelists

      • Anne Husbekk, Rector at University of Tromsø, the Arctic University of Norway (UiT)
      • Dagur B. Eggertsson, Mayor, City of Reykjavík
      • Guðbjörg Linda Rafnsdóttir, Pro-Rector of Science, University of Iceland
      • Daði Már Kristófersson, Dean of the School of Social Science, University of Iceland
      • Hege Kallbekken, MA Student in Political Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway

      Moderator

      • Margrét Cela, Project Manager, Centre for Arctic Policy Studies, University of Iceland

      Polar Law: Sustainable Development

      Organized by the University of Akureyri (15. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 15:30-17:00

      Location: Main Hall, Þjóðmenningarhúsið (National Centre for Cultural Heritage)

      This panel explores selected topics pertaining to sustainable economic development in the Arctic.

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      It begins by addressing the status of lands and resources and questions whether a ‘new colonialism’ is taking place. It also examines the conditions that would be necessary for development in the Arctic to be just and respectful of indigenous rights. The panel moves on to consider the anticipated impacts of new international trade deals on the peoples and economies of the Arctic. The third paper presents the legal requirements for design and construction in the hostile Arctic climate. Development offshore depends on the peaceful settlement of ongoing boundary disputes and arbitration is presented as an option to reach this end. Finally, Iceland’s framework and Master Plan for the sustainable exploitation of energy resources are explained. 

      Speakers:

      • John M. Sky Starkey, Lawyer representing Alaska tribal organizations: Colonialism of Arctic Indigenous Lands and Waters in the 21st Century.
      • Mary Durfee, Associate Professor of International Relations, Michican Tech University: Free Trade: The Expected Impacts of TTIP and CETA on the Arctic.
      • Romanov Oleg, Lawyer: A Review of the Legislation of Arctic States in the Field of Design and Construction.
      • Agnieszka Ason, Adjunct Professor, Technical University of Berlin: International Arbitration as a Method of Resolution of Boundary Disputes in the Arctic.
      • Skúli Thoroddsen, Orkustofnun: Resource utilisation in Iceland for energy production, legal regime and Master Plan.

      Chair: 

      • Natalia Loukacheva, Canada Research Chair in Aboriginal Governance and Law, University of Northern British Columbia

      Infrastructure Development in the Arctic: Social, Commercial and Technical Perspectives of Upcoming Opportunities

      Organized by Bremenports GmbH & Co. KG (16. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 15:30-17:00

      Location: Akrafjall, Harpa Fourth Level

      The Session aims at highlighting the social impacts, technical requirements as well as commercial prerequisites of infrastructure development in the Arctic.

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      The Finnafjord Harbour Project will be used to illustrate these three perspectives along this emerging port facility in North-Eastern Iceland. The moderated session will bring together four speakers from various backgrounds, including municipalities, private investors, project development organisations as well as from engineering

      Speakers:

      • Elías Pétursson, Mayor, Municipality of Langanesbyggð: The Social Impact of large-scale Infrastructure Projects for Rural Communities
      • James E. Pass, Senior Managing Director, Guggenheim Partners: The Investor's View
      • Hafsteinn Helgason, Efla Consulting Engineers: Technical Challenges in the Arctic
      • Lars Stemmler, Head of International Projects, bremenports GmbH & Co. KG: The Finnafjord Harbour Project: Progressing Towards a Business Opportunity for the Arctic

      Chair:

      • Robert Howe, Managing Director, bremenports GmbH & Co. KG

      Oil Expansion in the Arctic in the Context of Climate Litigation Cases Around the World

      Organized by​ Greenpeace (16. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 15:30-17:00

      Location: Björtuloft, Harpa Fifth Level

      A panel of experts on climate change litigation, including intergenerational rights, environmental and human rights liability and state responsibility will discuss the wave of climate litigation cases around the world.

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      Cases are already in motion in the USA, the Netherlands, the Philippines, Belgium and Switzerland among others. Now a coalition of organisations in Norway is considering legal action against the government announced 23rd oil and gas license round in Arctic waters, invoking paragraph 112 of the Constitution, which protects the right of future generations to a healthy environment.

      Speakers:

      • Julia Olson, Executive Director and Chief Legal Counsel, Our Children's Trust
      • Roger Cox, Lead Lawyer for the Urgenda Foundation, Canadian Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI)
      • Michael Byers, Canada Research Chair in Global Politics and International Law, University of British Columbia
      • Michelle Jonker-Argueta, Legal Counsel, Greenpeace International

      Chair:

      • Truls Gulowsen, Head of Greenpeace Norway

      From Alaska to Lapland – Local Voices Strengthening Arctic Council Chairmanships.

      Organized by the Institute of the North and the Arctic Centre (15. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 15:30-17:00

      Location: Esja, Harpa Fifth Level

      This roundtable discussion will reflect on Alaska’s experience in coordinating a sub-national host committee, which has organized side events during the U.S. Chairmanship of the Arctic Council, on the margins of SDWG and SAO meetings. 

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      Alaskan speakers will share their experience in convening a diverse group of community, political, economic and indigenous leaders; and methodology related to advancing areas of interest to the state. Lapland, similarly, has been preparing a Host Committee in anticipation of the Finnish Chairmanship. Session participants from Lapland will share their planning to date. A facilitated discussion will identify commonalities and differences, and work to strengthen future host committee planning as a best practice during future chairmanships of the Arctic Council.

      Speakers:

      • Craig Fleener, Senior Advisor, Arctic Policy & Climate Change, Office of the Governor, Alaska: Advocating for Alaskan Priorities.
      • Michael Sfraga, Vice Chancellor, University of Alaska Fairbanks: Highlighting Alaska’s Research Capabilities.
      • Mika Riipi, County Governor of Lapland: Lapland as a Partner in the Finnish Chairmanship.
      • Timo Rautajoki, President & CEO, Lapland Chamber of Commerce, Finland: Arctic Business Interests.

      Chairs:

      • Nils Andreassen, Executive Director, Institute of the North  
      • Timo Koivurova, Director, Arctic Centre

      Germany's Commitments to Arctic Research and Research Cooperation

      Organized by the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research International Arctic Science Committee (IASC) (16. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 15:30-17:00

      Location: Háaloft, Harpa Eighth Level

      Polar exploration has a long and distinguished tradition in Germany. Though not an Arctic nation, Germany runs one of the largest Arctic research programs worldwide. 

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      With the research icebreaker Polarstern and the successor Polarstern II in planning, Arctic stations and aircrafts, Germany is in the position to make a substantial contribution to the infrastructure required for international Arctic research. Close international cooperation plays a central role in gaining an understanding of future developments of the Arctic. Germany is committed to international cooperation in various ways and German scientists play a leading role in a number of international Arctic research activities. Building on the well-received German country presentation at the last Arctic Circle Assembly, this breakout session focuses on Germany´ Arctic research activities and contributions to international Arctic research cooperation. Representatives of the major German research institutes working in the Arctic will present national and international research programs and flagship projects.

      Speakers:

      • Karin Lochte, Director, Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI): Advancing Understanding of the Arctic Through New Technologies.
      • Simon Plass, Project Manager, German Aerospace Center (DLR): DLR Contributions to Arctic Research.
      • Heidimarie Kassens, Senior Research Scientist, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research: The Laptev Sea - Hotspot for Climate Research in the Russian Arctic.
      • Ralph Watzel, President, Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR): Natural Resources in the Changing Arctic.
      • Kathrin Keil, Project Scientist, Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS): Sustainability and Governance Challenges in a Changing Arctic.
      • Markus Rex, Senior Scientist, Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI): The Multidisciplinary Drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate (MOSAiC).
      • Volker Rachold, Secretary General, International Arctic Science Committee (IASC): International Arctic Research Cooperation.

      Telecommunications and Satellites on Top of the World

      Organized by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark, the Technical University of Denmark and DLR - the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany (26. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 15:30-17:00

      Location: Silfurberg B, Harpa Second Level

      Have you experienced low internet speed in the Arctic?

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      Communications infrastructure such as satellite capacity is important to facilitating sustainable development, commercial activities, education, health care, and to improving conditions for further economic development in the Arctic.

      This session will discuss various potential benefits to better telecommunications infrastructure in the Arctic:

      • increased capacity to share data in the case of accidents and environmental incidents
      • better surveillance capacity of the ocean environment
      • improved safety of maritime traffic in the Arctic
      • fast and reliable internet connections for Arctic communities and businesses, as well as education

      Join us for a debate on how to improve telecommunications infrastructure in the Arctic!

      Speakers:

      • Hanne Fugl Eskjær, Arctic Ambassador of the Kingdom of Denmark, Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs
      • Bo N. Andersen, Director General, Norwegian Space Center; Arctic Council Task Force on Telecommunications in the Arctic
      • Niels Andersen, Deputy Director, Technical University of Denmark: Multiuse Space Infrastructure in the Arctic
      • Kjell-Ove Orderud Skare, Leader Strategy and Analysis, Space Norway: The Quest for Arctic Communications
      • Jeremy Wilkinson, Lead Investigator, NERC Arctic Research Programme, British Antarctic Survey: Needs and Requests Towards Telecommunications in Perspective of Arctic Science Activities

      Arctic Freshwater Resource Dynamics and Socio-environmental Challenges: A Roundtable Discussion

      Organized by Western Kentucky University; University of Akureyri; the Icelandic Arctic Cooperation Network; Icelandic Meteorological Office; Marine and Freshwater Institute, the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) Working Group of the Arctic Council, and the Icelandic Centre for Research (RANNÍS) and the Rif Research Field Station (26. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 15:30-17:00

      Location: Eyri, Harpa Second Level

      Global freshwater is a finite and vulnerable resource, including in Arctic regions where climatic influences are manifesting in the form of melting glaciers, increased flooding and hydrological variability, declines and changes to arctic flora and fauna, and changes in ocean water composition from freshwater inputs.

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      Further, ecosystem changes are as of yet unknown in many regions due to evolving long-term impacts from water resource variability. There lacks a dialogue on the social and environmental implications of changing global freshwater resources with respect to the Arctic, which is necessary to bring to realization the potential questions and stakeholders needed to identify solutions. Collectively, this session proposes to create discourse on the physical and socio-economic bases of future freshwater resources, including groundwater and surface water monitoring and understanding, vulnerability to flora and fauna from climatic and human impacts, the socio-environmental dynamics of water resource resilience, scarcity issues, quality and quantity, social equity, perception, and education. A key component is determining mechanisms for communicating between stakeholders and those individuals with the knowledge about the complexities of arctic freshwater challenges and opportunities into the future to couch this topic in an interconnected, broader social and policy context.

      Speakers/Panelists:

      • Jason Polk, Department of Geography and Geology, Western Kentucky University: Freshwater Resources with Regard to a Changing Climate
      • Leslie North, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Geology, Western Kentucky University: Effective Education and Communication about Regional Freshwater Resource Dynamics
      • Steingrímur Jónsson, Professor of Physical Oceanography, University of Akureyri, Scientist, Marine Research Institute: Fate of Freshwater in the Arctic Ocean and its Climate Significance
      • Thorsteinn Thorsteinsson, Glaciological Research, Icelandic Met Office: Glaciers and Ice Caps in the Arctic Region
      • Halldór Björnsson, Head of Atmospheric Research Group, Icelandic Met Office
      • Jón S. Ólafsson, Senior Scientist, Institute of Freshwater Fisheries: Freshwater Ecosystems in the Arctic
      • Thorsteinn Gunnarsson, Senior Adviser, Icelandic Center of Research, RANNÍS
      • Kári Fannar Lárusson, Programme Manager, CAFF
      • Jonina Sigridur Thorlaksdottir, Rif Research Station
      • Anisha Tuladhar, Geoscience Graduate Student, Department of Geography and Geology, Western Kentucky University: Importance and Dynamics of Glacial Rivers in Iceland
      • James Graham, Western Kentucky University

      Chair

      • Embla Eir Oddsdóttir, Director, Icelandic Arctic Cooperation Network

      Sensitive Northern Destinations: Tourism Management and Tourist Dispersion

      Organized by EFLA Consulting Engineers (19. September 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 15:30-17:00

      Location: Hafnarkot, Harpa First Level

      Tourism is a growing source of economic and social benefits in the North, but when a sparsely populated area experiences exponential growth in tourism in only a few years, the infrastructure, safety issues and area management are often found lacking.

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      Arctic nature is spectacular and a common draw for tourists, but it is likewise sensitive and slow to recover from being overrun. Local authorities and land owners frequently find themselves in a flurry of hurried activities attempting to deal with the growing numbers, sometimes resulting in better control and nature protection, but sometimes not.

      Core issues include who is responsible for funding varied necessary actions aimed to control the tourist flow and protect nature. Meanwhile, tourists face various dangers and inconveniences due to lacking infrastructure, such as information, safety measures and toilet facilities. In this breakout session, various aspects of these issues will be discussed, case studies presented and possible options reviewed, with expert solution case studies from the US and Iceland.

      Speakers

      • Nathan Reigner, Consultant, RSG Inc.: Maximizing the Benefits and Minimizing the Impacts of Tourism with Indicator-Based Adaptive Planning and Management.
      • Eva Dís Þórðardóttir, Specialist in planning, EIA: Possible Solution for Sustainable Tourism in the Westfjords.
      • Böðvar Tómasson, Specialist in Risk Management and Safety: Dangerous trip to Iceland? - Risk Management in the Tourism Industry.
      • Þórður H. Ólafsson, Managing Director, Vatnajökull National Park: Vatnajökull National Park – Increased Need for Infrastructure and Improved Nature Conservation Measures.

      The Educating of Mid-Latitudinal Countries on Climate Change through Art and Science: “To See Things Differently”

      Organized by the Arctic Arts Project, the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) at the University of Colorado, and the Stefansson Arctic Institute (16. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 15:30-17:00

      Location: Kaldalón, Harpa First Level

      The Arctic Arts Project, in conjunction with The Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, The Earth Vision Institute and The Stefansson Arctic Institute, will present a dynamic and visually stimulating forum on how art and science work together to provide education and clarity to mid-latitudinal countries, in regard to climate change.

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      This forum will bring together some of the foremost communicators of climate change in the world, and will engage participants in the visual tools and methodology currently being utilized to educate and inspire the populous at large. The team will generate an open dialog on the emerging channels of media distribution and how it can be best served to reveal scientific evidence on a global scale. The panel will present a series of photographic, cinematographic images and clips, and research data, from their work in the Arctic.  Additionally, the forum will show how this internationally recognized group of communicators utilizes visual mediums to communicate scientific evidence.

      Speakers:

      • Kerry Koepping, Director/Photographer, Arctic Arts Project; Research Affiliate, INSTAAR
      • James Balog, Director, Earth Vision Institute; Research Affiliate, INSTAAR; Director, Extreme Ice Survey
      • Elizabeth Ogilvie, Environmental Artist
      • Astrid Ogilvie, Senior Scientist, Stefansson Arctic Institute; Fellow, INSTAAR

      Moderator/Chair

      • Níels Einarsson, Director, Stefansson Arctic Institute

      Thinking Like an Ecosystem: Ecosystem Services Thinking to Support Sustainable Development

      Organized by the WWF Arctic Programme (26. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 15:30-17:00

      Location: Ríma A, Harpa First Level

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      Speakers: 

      • Martin Sommerkorn, Head of Conservation, WWF Arctic Program: Valuing Arctic Nature Through the Ecosystem Services Lens: Conservation Opportunity or Commodification Trap?
      • Spencer Wood, Senior Research Scientist, University of Washington; Senior Scientist, Natural Capital Project: How Information on Biodiversity and Natural Assets Can Inform Sustainable Development Decisions in the Arctic.
      • Gunn-Britt Retter, Head of the Arctic and Environment Unit, Saami Council: Is the Value of Saami Culture the Same for You as for Me? Reflections on Why Valuing Nature is Challenging

      Chair:

      • Liisa Rohweder, CEO of WWF Finland

      Reimagining the Arctic… As The World’s Data Center

      Organized by the Fletcher School at Tufts University (7. September 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 15:30-17:00

      Location: Ríma B, Harpa First Level

      The Fletcher School’s Institute for Business in the Global Context (IBGC) will lead a panel of an interdisciplinary set of actors: technologists and data center industry leaders, innovators, policymakers from the countries of the Arctic and beyond, and academics to explore in depth what needs to be true in order for the Arctic region to be turned into a custodian of the world’s data.

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      A large portion of data center capital expenditures and operating costs are devoted towards cooling infrastructure, in order to keep equipment operating efficiently. As of 2010, data centers globally accounted for 1.1% – 1.5% of global energy consumption. Nordic countries are leaders in leveraging their climates by situating data centers in naturally cooled locations, whether in abandoned mines such as Lefdal in Norway, or former military bunkers, such as Rockan in Sweden. Iceland’s Verne Global data center was named as a top sustainable solution at the recent Rio+20 by Sustainia, a Danish think tank consortium.

      This panel will take an interdisciplinary perspective: business & economics, regulation, security and geo-politics, technology, environment, and global cooperation.

      Speakers

      • Frederik Vyncke, CEO, Rockan DataCenter, Sweden
      • Peter Kelly-Detwiler, Principal, Northbridge Energy Partners, USA
      • Hilmar Veigar Pétursson, CEO, CCP Games, Iceland*
      • Doug Raymond, Global Head of Performance Advertising, Amazon, USA*

      Moderator

      • Caroline Troein, Technology and Innovation Researcher, Institute for Business in the Global Context (IBGC), Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University

      Operational Marine Service in the Arctic

      Organized by EuroGOOS AISBL (26. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 15:30-17:00

      Location: Sæbjörg S&R Vessel

      Climate change opens up for increased activities within a number of marine and maritime industries in the Arctic Region such as:

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      • Maritime transport
      • Oil and mineral exploitation incl. support to oil spill combatting  
      • Tourism
      • Fishery incl. aquaculture
      • Wind Energy

      Critical information for all these industries for long- and short-term investment planning, risk assessment and operational purposes is knowledge of the environmental fields affecting marine operations in the Arctic Ocean. Service providers will therefore employ model analysis or reanalysis of wind, temperature, sea ice, sea state, near surface ocean currents and icing index in combination with in situ and remote sensing observations. Ongoing research aims to increase the quality and availability of data products needed to improve operational forecasts of marine conditions.

      The session will give an overview on existing operational marine services in the Arctic in support of Blue Growth.

      Speakers:

      • Odd Jarl Borch, Professor of Strategy, Graduate School of Business, Nord University: Arctic Blue Economy.
      • Einar Hjörleifsson, Fisheries Scientist, Marine Research Institute of Iceland: Fisheries Management - Present and Uncertain Future Dynamics.
      • Agnieszka Beszczynska-Möller, Research Scientist, Institute of Oceanography, Polish Academy of Sciences: Arctic Ocean Observation System.
      • Stein Sandven, Research Director, Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center (NERSC): Operational Marine Services: Arctic Sea Ice Monitoring and Forecasting
      • Torbjørn Eltoft, Professor, University of Tromsø: Integrated Remote Sensing and Forecasting for Arctic Operations
      • Henning Wehde, Head of Research and Advice Programme North Sea, Institute of Marine Research

      Moderator:

      • Stein Sandven, Research Director, Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center (NERSC)

      A Youth-Led Conversation about the Future of the Arctic

      Organized by Alaska Geographic and the United States Department of State (26. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 15:30-17:00

      Location: Skarðsheiði, Harpa Third Level

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      Speakers

      • Macy Kenworthy, United States Arctic Youth Ambassador
      • Caitlyn Baikie, Manager, Arctic Students and Partnership Program, Students on Ice Expeditions
      • Valerie Craig, Senior Director, Impact Initiatives, National Geographic Society

      Learning from the Past: Towards an Inclusive International Network of Arctic Science Research

      Organized by the UK Science & Innovation Network – Nordics and the Arctic Institute (16. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 15:30-17:00

      Location: Stemma, Harpa First Level

      Learning from the Past seeks to break down the national borders and academic disciplines that often silo Arctic research into compartmentalized working groups, projects, and databases through lessons from past UK scientific expeditions and current successful multidisciplinary, multinational circumpolar endeavours.

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      The event aims to foster a dialogue between Arctic and non-Arctic states, indigenous peoples of the North, social scientists, natural scientists, and humanities scholars by bringing together an international group of researchers from the North, Europe, and Asia. The first half of the session will be a roundtable discussion on the historical and current day examples of cross-disciplinary, cross-border Arctic research projects, illuminating why these were successful and what lessons could be learned from their success. The second half of the session will be a full-group discussion formatted as a ‘brain trust’ that will create a concrete list of take-aways for how to create multidisciplinary, multinational Arctic research projects.

      Speakers:

      • Victoria Herrmann, President and Managing Director, The Arctic Institute
      • Michael Bravo, University Senior Lecturer and Fellow of Downing College, Scott Polar Research Institute
      • Klaus Dodds, Professor of Geopolitics, Royal Holloway University of London
      • Duncan Depledge, Director, All-Party Parliamentary Group for Polar Regions, United Kingdom
      • Cécile Pelaudeix, Associate Professor, Aarhus University and Research Associate, Sciences Po Grenoble: Political Science and Law in Interdisciplinary Research: Historical Steps and Current Trends
      • Lill Rastad Bjørst, Associate Professor, Department of Culture and Global Studies, Aalborg University
      • Pelle Tejsner, Assistant Professor, Aarhus University

      Chair

      • Louise Heathwaite, Chief Scientific Adviser for Rural Affairs, Food and the Environment, Scottish Government

      Canadian Arctic Policy: Recent Developments and the Way Ahead

      Organized by the Center for International Governance Innovation (16. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 15:30-17:00

      LocationNorðurljós, Harpa Second Level

      Canada with its vast Arctic territory is a central player in Arctic development and diplomacy. The Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) is organizing a breakout session on permanent factors, lasting principles and new developments in Canadian Arctic Policy. 

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      Experts will discuss topics such as changes in Federal Arctic Policy under the Trudeau government over the past year, the challenges and opportunities created by Arctic warming, relations with Territorial Governments and Indigenous inhabitants, urgent social issues, infrastructure needs including roads, ports, airports and broadband, security and defense, foreign policy, Canada-US relations, and federal /provincial / territorial differences.

      Speakers: 

      • Whitney Lackenbauer, Professor, Department of History, St. Jerome’s University (University of Waterloo): Canadian Arctic Policy: Continuity and Change
      • David Runnalls, Distinguished Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation and International Institute for Sustainable Development: Climate Change and the Canadian Arctic
      • Suzanne Lalonde, Professor of Law, University of Montreal: Legal Issues in Canada’s Arctic Policy
      • Stephen Van Dine, Assistant Deputy Minister, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada: Renewing Canadian Arctic and Northern Policy
      • Rob Huebert, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Calgary: Canada and Russia in the Arctic: Dialogue and Deterrence
      • Shaleen Woodward, Deputy Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Intergovernmental Relations, Government of the Northwest Territories: Northwest Territories’ Perspective on Canada’s Arctic Policy
      • Senior representative, Global Affairs Canada: Canada’s International Arctic Policies in Transition*

      Chair:

      • John Higginbotham, Senior Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation and Carleton University

      Global Arctic: The Art and Culture of Climate Change (in the Arctic)

      Organized by the GlobalArctic Project and the Northern Research Forum (NRF) (26. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 15:30-17:00

      Location: Silfurberg A, Harpa Second Level

      This session is intended to be purposefully broad and inclusive to promote discussion on the diverse ways in which art and culture and climate change intersect.

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      In addition to brief speaker presentations to provide a foundation for discussion, the session will include an interactive moderated dialogue between the panel of speakers and audience members. Session moderators will facilitate the panelists’ and audience members’ exploration of the topic and identification of additional themes of interest that result from the discussion.

      Speakers:

      • Guðbjörg R. Jóhannesdóttir, Adjunct, Iceland Academy of Arts; Postdoc in Philosophy, University of Iceland: Coming to Our Senses and Understanding Our Place in the Natural World
      • Grete K. Hovelsrud, Professor, Nord University, Bodø Norway: An Arctic Perspective on the Role of Culture and World Views in Shaping Adaptation and Mitigation to Climate Change
      • “Cultures of Climate Change: Fast Media and Slow Media on the Arctic”
        • Miyase Christensen, Professor, Stockholm University and KTH Royal Institute of Technology
        • Tom Buurman, PhD Candidate, Stockholm University
      • Kristján Hrannar Pálsson, musician and producer: Music, Climate Change and Popular Culture

      Moderator

      • Thorsteinn Gunnarsson, Senior Adviser, Icelandic Center of Research, Rannis

      Exploring the Nexus of Health and Climate Change in Arctic Indigenous Communities

      Organized by Ecologic Institute Berlin and the Ecologic Institute US (26. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 17:15-18:45

      This session in kindly supported by Konrad Adenauer Foundation and WWF.

      Location: Stemma, Harpa First Level

      This session showcases the Arctic Summer College (ASC) program by inviting three of its 2016 Fellows to present their work to the international Arctic community.

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      The session will begin by exploring the fundamental role that the Arctic plays in not only global climate change, but in potentially altering global weather patterns which has particular consequences for Indigenous communities. Then, the connection between health and climate change will be examined through the lens of Arctic Indigenous communities in several Arctic states. Finally, the issue of sexual violence in Indigenous communities will be discussed with a focus on the US and Canada, providing additional context as we explore the challenging relationship between climate change and Indigenous health, both today and in the future.

      The ASC, already in its sixth year, creates a virtual network of emerging leaders and experts who are brought together for eight weeks of interdisciplinary exchange, including a series of web-based seminars. The program aims to build a lasting, policy-oriented network of Arctic professionals and students to strengthen communication between peoples and nations, scientific disciplines, policy areas, and across the science-policy interface to improve governance and sustainable development in the Arctic.

      Speakers

      • Arne Riedel, Fellow, Ecologic Institute Mikayla Duarte, Meteorology Student, Northland College
      • Carol Devine, Humanitarian Advisor, Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders), Canada
      • Mary Ehrlander, Director, Arctic & Northern Studies Program, Professor of History, University of Alaska Fairbanks
      • Mikayla Duarte, Meteorology Student at Northland College         

      Moderator

      • Andreas Kraemer, Senior Fellow, IASS Potsdam; Founder, Ecologic Institute

      Emergency Preparedness in Small Communities: Project Updates

      Organized by the Institute of the North (15. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 17:15-18:45

      Location: Akrafjall, Harpa Fourth Level

      This interactive session will focus on a current project of the Arctic Council’s EPPR Working Group, “PPR in Small Communities.” 

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      The project will produce a database of community-level preparedness, comprised of information related to planning, training, risk, impact and response assets. Participants will review the scoping document, suggest additional resources, provide feedback on the evaluative mechanism and generally comment on oil spill planning, preparedness and response at a local level.

      Speakers:

      • Nils Andreassen, Executive Director, Institute of the North: Oil Spill Preparedness in Small Communities: A Circumpolar, Local Approach to Risk and Response
      • Tor Husjord, CEO, Maritimt Forum North, Norway: Applied Research and Cooperation for Successful Search and Rescue Operations
      • Anthony Edwardsen, President & CEO, Ukpeaġvik Iñupiat Corporation (UIC): Building Capacity within Local Communities: An Indigenous-Driven, Innovative Solution

      Remote Renewable Case Studies: Participatory Stakeholder Engagement for a Sustainable Future

      Organized by WWF-Canada, the WWF Arctic Programme and the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS), Potsdam, Germany (18. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 17:15-18:45

      Location: Háaloft, Harpa Eighth Level

      There is common understanding that the global community needs to act on multiple challenges that global change processes bring about for living conditions on earth, including climate change, availability of resources, securing access to clean and affordable energy, and the dangers from environmental degradation. In no place is the interrelationship and understanding of these issues more pressing than in the Arctic.

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      The United Nations 2030 agenda for sustainable development cites "Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all" as number 7 of its 17 goals. In remote regions of the world, these problems come into sharp focus and although there remains much work to do to reach this goal, there are good examples of these problems being solved at the community as well as the state level, for example, renewable energy deployment projects. To address Arctic-global connections, thorough attention must also be paid to the ability and empowerment of stakeholders/actors (both within and outside the Arctic and across geographical boundaries) to engage and participate in shaping the future of energy in the region. In this session, the future of renewable energy in the North will be discussed in this context, bringing together experts on stakeholder engagement and renewable energy in the Arctic. Building partnerships, strengthening global-regional interconnections and strengthened stakeholder engagement and interaction will aid the transition to sustainable, participatory, and affordable energy futures for the Arctic.

      Guiding Questions:

      • What are the causes and consequences of energy isolation or poverty in harsh environments like in Arctic regions? Which causes are regional, which global in nature?
      • What are the specific conditions and challenges for individual Arctic communities to sustainable, participatory and affordable energy futures?
      • What ideas and initiatives exist to improve sustainable energy access in energy-isolated communities?
      • How can Arctic communities learn from each other through an open exchange of knowledge, experiences and best practices?
      • How can non-Arctic actors contribute to energy security within the region and address sustainability concerns of Arctic oil and gas development?

      Goals:

      • Create and strengthen existing networks between stake- and rights-holders residing within and outside the Arctic and initiate a dialogue for lessons learned between different Arctic regions concerning sustainable and affordable energy futures.
      • Discuss and share lessons learned between different Arctic regions, including potential solutions that might generate investments in RE projects and the role various stakeholders might play in advancing implementation.
      • Outline how innovative policy and ownership arrangements and strengthened networks between stake-and rights-holders residing within and outside the Arctic can accelerate the substitution of diesel with renewable energy options.

      Speakers

      • Farid Sharifi, Senior Specialist – Renewable Energy, WWF-Canada: WWF-Canada’s recent efforts to implement three renewable energy projects in Canada’s Arctic by 2020 
      • Greg Poelzer, Executive Chair of ICNGD; Professor, School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan
      • Kåre Hendriksen, Associate Professor, Arctic Technology Department, Technical University of Denmark
      • Kirsti Mijnhijmer, Programme Manager, Northern Periphery and Arctic Programme Secretariat

      Chair: David Miller, President & CEO, WWF-Canada


      Cleaning the (Arctic) Ocean

      Organized by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands (26. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 17:15-18:45

      Location: Hafnarkot, Harpa First Level

      The goal of the session is to illustrate the importance of clean and healthy oceans and to discuss some of the threats that oceans and Arctic waters are facing, in particular plastic debris and marine litter.

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      Among the questions that will be addressed are the following. What kind of pollution is found in the Arctic, on the shores but also for example in bird stomachs? What are the sources and what can be done to tackle the problems? What role can governments, industry, NGO’s and individuals play to ensure that the oceans, and the Arctic ocean in particular, remain healthy for long term sustainable use?

      This session will be kicked off and moderated by the Dutch Arctic Ambassador for the Netherlands, Mr. Kees Rade, and/or the Senior Artic Official to the Arctic Council for the Netherlands, Mr. Jorden Splinter.

      Speakers

      • Susanne Kühn, PhD Student, Wageningen University Marine Research: The Northern Fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis) as an Indicator for Marine Plastic Pollution.
      • Lex Oosterbaan, Senior Adviser, Rijkswaterstaat, Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment in the Netherlands: Dealing with Marine Litter, Green Deals and Crossing Borders.
      • Eelco Leemans, Founder/ CEO, Leemans Maritime Consultancy: Preventing Maritime Litter: Strategies to Prevent Marine Litter from Shipping and Fisheries.

      The Arctic as a Venue for U.S. and Asian Cooperation with Russia

      Organized by the RAND Corporation (24. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 17:15-18:45

      Location: Kaldalón, Harpa First Level

      Tensions between Russia and the U.S. have deepened since the annexation of Crimea in 2014. The Arctic, however, has remained a relative bright spot for cooperation between the two states, with the Arctic Council providing a forum for bilateral and broader multilateral dialogue between Russia and the West on issues such as search and rescue coordination, oil spill prevention, and black carbon mitigation

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      At the same time, as U.S. and E.U. sanctions and the drop in the price of oil have continued to take their toll on the Russian energy sector, Russia has turned towards East Asian states, particularly China and South Korea, for financing and infrastructure. In light of these developments, this session considers whether the Arctic Council will remain a viable arena for cooperation between Russia and the West and whether Russia really is making an eastern turn, even in the Arctic.

      Speakers:

      • Mia Bennett, PhD Candidate, Department of Geography, UCLA and Founder, Cryopolitics.com: Shifting from West to East: Russian-Asian Cooperation in the Arctic.
      • Natalia Loukacheva, Canada Research Chair in Aboriginal Governance and Law, University of Northern British Columbia, Canada: Prospects for North American Cooperation with Russia in the Arctic.
      • Elana Wilson Rowe, Senior Research Fellow/Adjunct Professor, University of Nordland: Network diplomacy and Arctic politics
      • Jørgen Staun, Associate Professor, Institute for Strategy, Royal Danish Defense College, Copenhagen: Russian Arctic policy.
      • Ekaterina B. Sokolova, Head of the East Asia Research Center, Center for Maritime International Studies of Admiral Nevelskoy Maritime State University, Russia: Russia's view toward international collaboration in developing the Northern Sea Route.

      Chair:

      • Abbie Tingstad, PhD, Physical Scientist, RAND Corporation: The Arctic as a Venue for U.S. and Asian Cooperation with Russia.

      Sustainable Marine Resources: a Piece of the Blue Economy Puzzle in the Arctic?

      Organized by the North Atlantic Marine Mammal Commission, NAMMCO (30. September 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 17:15-18:45

      Location: Norðurljós, Harpa Second Level

      The session will attempt to bring out the main facts regarding the biology, management and international commitments regarding marine mammal resources in the North. A special focus will be on the economic and cultural importance of these resources. 

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      The international commitments permitting and ensuring the sustainable and responsible use of marine resources will be reviewed as well as the advances in management and monitoring methodologies which permit the science-based approach to replace decades of overexploitation by sustainable exploitation. The Greenlandic example will illustrate the societal and economical price to coastal communities of not being able to exploit marine resources at hands. The session will open to the question of whether we are not at the time when the sustainable use of marine mammals is possible and one piece of the Blue Economy puzzle, thus accommodating the cultural and economic needs of the people in the North with our all willingness of preserving and restoring the marine ecosystem.

      Speakers and panelists:

      • Ásta Einarsdóttir, Chair of NAMMCO, Senior Legal Expert; Ministry of Industries and Innovation, Iceland: Introduction to NAMMCO
      • Grímur Valdimarsson, Senior Advisor, Ministry of Industries and Innovation, Iceland: The Use of Living Marine Resources: The Rules of the Game
      • Jóhann Sigurjónsson, Special Envoy on Ocean Affairs, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Iceland: Science-based Use of Living Marine Resources.
      • Ditte H. Sorknæs, Chief Executive Officer, Great Greenland: The Economical and Societal Consequences of Trade Barriers on Inuit Communities.
      • Amalie Jessen, Head of Department, Greenlandic Ministry of Fisheries, Hunting and Agriculture 
      • Jóannes V. Hansen, Head of Section, Foreign Service, Faroese Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade

      Chair:

      • Martin Breum, Journalist and author

      Roundtable discussion.

      Corporate Social Responsibility in the Arctic

      Organized by the Emerging Leaders in Environmental & Energy Policy network (coordinated and funded by the Atlantic Council and Ecologic Institute think tanks) (18. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 17:15-18:45

      Location: Ríma B, Harpa First Level

      Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is the practice by which companies decide to voluntarily contribute to a better society and a cleaner environment. It means that companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their core business operations and in their interaction with stakeholders.

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      For the Arctic region, the Ministers representing the eight Arctic States officially welcomed the Arctic Council’s work on CSR within the May 2013 Kiruna Declaration. It is therefore vital for companies looking to do business in the region to obtain and maintain their ‘social license to operate’, yet full multidisciplinary commitment is still lacking. From a multi-sector perspective, including the mining and oil & gas industries, this session uncovers transatlantic opportunities for companies operating in the Arctic to offer communities improved livelihoods whilst at the same time continuing to do business in the region. The session hopes to identify key challenges, as well as potential solutions, based on internationally recognised methods of best practice.

      Speakers: 

      • Jóhanna Harpa Árnadóttir, Project Manager – CSR, Landsvirkjun
      • Edvard Glücksman, Social & Environmental Specialist, Wardell Armstrong and University of Exeter
      • Victoria Herrmann, President and Managing Director, The Arctic Institute
      • Ketill Berg Magnússon, Managing Director, Festa - Icelandic Center for Corporate Social Responsibility

      Chair: 

      • Stacy Closson, Associate Professor, Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce, University of Kentucky; 2016 Core Fulbright U.S. Scholar

      Arctic Invasive Alien Species: Acting Now to Prevent the Worst

      Organized by the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) and the Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment (PAME) Working Groups of the Arctic Council (13. September 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 17:15-18:45

      Location: Skarðsheiði, Harpa Third Level

      There are currently few invasive alien species in the Arctic, but more are expected with climate change and increased human activity. This represents a unique opportunity in the Arctic to decisively act now to reduce the threat before the problem becomes costly and resource intensive to address.

       

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      Under the Arctic Council, CAFF in partnership with PAME (on the marine component), has developed an Arctic Invasive Alien Species Strategy and Action Plan (ARIAS) (led by U.S.A. and Norway) to develop a strategy to prevent the introduction of invasive species in Arctic ecosystems.

       This effort is particularly urgent for the Arctic region. Rapid climate change is making the region more vulnerable to invasive species introductions, and at the same time a rapid surge in human activity, transit, and energy development in the region is increasing the chance of introduction of new and invasive species. There is an immediate opportunity—already largely lost in many other regions of the world—to proactively build resilience to the risks posed by invasive species to the Arctic’s unique social, economic, and environmental systems.

      Speakers: 

      • Gilbert Castellanos, International Affairs Specialist, US Fish and Wildlife Service: Introduction to the Invasive Species and Placement Within Arctic Council Work.
      • Jamie Reaser, Executive Director, National Invasive Species Council (NISC) Secretariat, US Department of the Interior: The Arctic Invasive Species Strategy and Action Plan: Why it is Needed Now.
      • Soffía Guðmundsdóttir, Executive Secretary, PAME: Efforts Underway to Develop and Implement Measures for Early Detection, Monitoring Eradication and Control in the Marine Environment.
      • Sigurrós Friðriksdóttir, Advisor, Icelandic Environment Agency: Challenges in Addressing Invasive Alien Species in the Marine Environment: A National Perspective.
      • Tero Vauraste, President and Chief Executive Officer, Arctia Ltd.; Co-Vice- Chair of the Arctic Economic Council: Three Industry Viewpoints on Invasive Species in the Arctic.

      Moderator

      Tom Barry, Executive Secretary, CAFF

      What’s going on in the North Atlantic?

      Organized by the University of Iceland, Icelandic Met Office, PIK (24. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 17:15-18:45

      Location: Björtuloft, Harpa Fifth Level

      In recent summaries of global temperature changes (such as in the IPCC WG1 report from 2013 [*]) the North Atlantic between Newfoundland and Ireland is one of the few regions on the globe that has defied the warming trend, and even cooled.  In recent years, a region of colder than usual temperatures has appeared there every winter, and often persisted throughout the summer. 

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      This phenomena has been referred to as the North Atlantic Cold Pool. What is going on? Oceanic conditions in this region are kept warm by the North Atlantic Current, an extension of the Gulf Stream, that brings warm waters towards Europe. The region is also a meeting place of water masses because there is a cold ocean current flowing from Greenland and the Labrador sea that encounters the warmer waters east of the Canada coast. To a certain extent the surface conditions in the North Atlantic are determined by the interaction of these warm and cold-water masses, but their dynamics is also influenced by the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation that has long been implicated in climate variability in the region. To complicate matters even further, conditions in the atmosphere, such as the frequency of cold air outbreaks from the North American continent during winter may also influence the local surface conditions of the ocean. Due to the number of different factors that influence the oceanic climate in the region explaining the appearance of the Cold Pool is not trivial.  Some studies show that the Cold Pool may be the result of a slowing down of the circulation that brings warm waters into the region, but more work is needed to understand the variability (natural as well as anthropogenic) of the region.  This workshop brings together scientists to discuss the origin and consequences of the Cold Pool.

      Speakers:

      • Halldór Bjornsson, Head of atmospheric research group, Icelandic Met Office:  “The North Atlantic Cold Pool. A short biography”
      • Stefan Rahmstorf, Head of Earth System Analysis, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research; Professor Potsdam University: Evidence for a significant slowdown of the North Atlantic overturning circulation
      • Ingibjörg Jónsdottir, Professor University of Iceland: The impact of the north Atlantic Cold Pool
      • Steingrímur Jónsson, Professor of Oceanography at the University of Akureyri
      • Héðinn Valdimarsson, Senior Research Scientist at the Marine Research Institute, Reykjavik

      Chair:

      • Oddur Sigurðsson, Geologist, Icelandic Met Office

      Cultivating Trans-Atlantic Ocean Foods Entrepreneurship Through International Scientific and Educational Cooperation

      Organized by the University of New England (UNE), New England Ocean Cluster, Holar University College, and the University of Akureyri (23. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 17:15-18:45

      Location: Esja, Harpa Fifth Level

      The world’s oceans produce only 1-4% of total human foods. Aquatic protein production systems of fisheries and aquaculture are far superior choices for global investments to 2050 and beyond in comparisons to any other terrestrial animal protein production systems. Nutrient-rich, omega-3 rich, seafoods are, from other global scientific reviews, better food choices for human health than land-based protein foods.

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      This session will focus on the needs for international scientific and educational partnerships for the full utilization and sustainable development of the rapidly developing North Atlantic and peri-Arctic seas fisheries and aquaculture resources. Full marine product utilization can lead to the development new ocean-based product development/recycling/innovation economies as more sustainable alternatives to the current, inefficient ocean food economies where about one-half of all fisheries harvests are wasted. We propose new, innovative, international university marine entrepreneurship programs to develop the next generation of ocean foods leaders that will implement the ideals of the FAO Conventions of responsible fisheries and ecological aquaculture and their allied economic opportunities. The session will develop new networking and partnership opportunities between academic institutions and seafood trade, product, and marketing institutions

      Speakers

      • Patrick Arnold, CEO of Soli DG: Achieving Full Utilization in the Ocean Economy
      • Barry Costa-Pierce,Professor, Chair and Director of the Department of Marine Sciences, Marine Science Center, University of New EnglandNew International Programs in Ocean Food Ecosystems
      • Ögmundur Knútsson, Dean, School of Business and Science, University of AkureyriDevelopment and Opportunities in North-Atlantic Fish Industry
      • Helgi Thorarensen, Professor of Aquaculture and Fish Physiology, Holar University College: Future Challenges to Aquaculture in the Arctic
      • Glenn Page, President/CEO of SustainaMetrix, USA; Developmental Evaluator in Residence, Centre for Environmental Change and Human Resilience, University of DundeeMeasuring Progress to Sustainability Through Complexity, Innovation and Learning

      BlueTech Innovation for a Developing Arctic

      Organized by the Fletcher School at Tufts University (18. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 17:15-18:45

      Location: Eyri, Harpa Second Level

      Blue Technology (BlueTech), maritime-oriented technology, is changing the ways humans interact with the ocean.  

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      New maritime technologies drive economic opportunities in sustainable fishing, renewable energy, and ocean data collection – and extend across diverse but complementary industries, including naval architecture, the Internet of Things, data science, and alternative energy.  This panel will explore BlueTech trends and how they could help Arctic communities implement sustainable development.

      The panelists represent leaders across the BlueTech domain, including the private sector, public sector, and academia.  They represent diverse industries, including fishing, energy, data science, and entrepreneurship, to provide a comprehensive view of BlueTech’s impact.

      Speakers:

      • Þór Sigfússon, Founder and CEO, Iceland Ocean Cluster House: Iceland Ocean Cluster House as a Blue Tech Innovation Model.
      • Halla Hrund Logadóttir, Louis Bacon Environmental Leadership Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government: Developing Renewable Energy in the Arctic - Successes and Challenges.
      • Matthew Merighi, Executive Director and Co-Founder, Blue Water Metrics Inc: Data and BlueTech: A New Arctic Resource?
      • Jack Whitacre, Research Fellow, Institute for Global Maritime Studies Inc: Cyber-Security and BlueTech Innovation in the Arctic.
      • Edward Anthes-Washburn, Executive Director, Port of New Bedford, Massachusetts: Sustainable Fishing and BlueTech Innovation in the Arctic.
      • Andrew C. Hess, Professor of Diplomacy & Director, Program on Southwest Asia & Central Asia, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University: Sustainable Strategies for Offshore Oil & Gas Exploration in the Arctic.

      Moderator:

      • Rockford Weitz, Professor of Practice, Entrepreneur Coach & Director, Maritime Studies Program, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University

      The Role of Arctic & Global Think Tanks in Arctic Policy Making

      Organized by the Observatoire des Think Tanks/Think Tanks Observatory (26. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 17:15-18:45

      Location: Main Hall, Þjóðmenningarhúsið (National Centre for Cultural Heritage)

      In the past decade, many think tanks around the world have started working on Arctic and Antarctic affairs. Moreover, some think tanks dedicated to Polar affairs have been created inside and outside the Arctic states. This breakout session will discuss the impact of think tanks in shaping Arctic and Antarctic policy, security and economic development.

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      In this breakout session, the European Think Tanks Observatory will also present its new “Arctic and Antarctic Think Tanks Directory” and “Arctic and Antarctic Think Tanks Transparency label”.

      The public, the media, administrations and decision-makers all increasingly rely on the input of think tanks to understand what is happening in the Arctic and Antarctic, what is at stake there, what is likely to happen there and how they should mitigate and respond to the increasing ecological, socio-economic and security risks these region face.

      But what is a “think tank”, really? Who do they work with and for? What is their degree of financial and political transparency?

      Speakers:

      • Olivier Urrutia, CEO, European Think Tanks Observatory, EU: Hey, What is a Think Tank, Actually?
      • Timo Rautajoki, President & CEO, Lapland Chamber of Commerce, Finland: Think Tanks as Bridges Between the Arctic Business and Policy Worlds
      • Aleqa Hammond MP, Member of the Danish Parliament, Greenland: Reflexions on the Influence of Think Tanks in Shaping Today and Tomorrow’s Arctic
      • Anželika Krastiņa, Lecturer, Lapland University of Applied Sciences, Finland: Case Study: “Think Barents” - an Arctic Think Tank
      • Mikaa Mered, Chief Strategy Officer, European Think Tanks Observatory, EU: Presentation of the Observatory’s Arctic & Antarctic Think Tanks Transparency Label

      Japan's Contribution: Science Challenge With Local Residents — Toward Arctic Sustainable Life

      Organized by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan, and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan (21. September 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 17:15-18:45

      Location: Ríma A, Harpa First Level

      This session will overview various research projects being conducted within the framework of the Arctic Challenge for Sustainability (ArCS), with a particular focus on relationship/collaboration between scientific activities and indigenous peoples, as well as knowledge sharing. 

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      Japan respects the right of indigenous peoples of the Arctic to continuity on their traditional economic and social foundations.  In this session, renowned Japanese researchers will give presentations on cutting-edge research.

      Speakers

      • Kazuko Shiraishi, Ambassador in charge of Arctic Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan
      • Takahiro Hayashi, Director, Ocean and Earth Division, Research and Development Bureau, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan
      • Shin Sugiyama, Associate Professor, Hokkaido University: The ice sheet/glacier-ocean interaction in Greenland.
      • Shirow Tatsuzawa, Assistant Professor, Hokkaido University:  Ecological changes and adaptation of wildlife-human interaction in the Arctic under the global warming.
      • Masanori Goto, Post Doctoral Fellow, Slavic-Eurasian Research Center, Hokkaido University: Constructing of teaching materials of environment education related to local history in Siberia synthesizing cultural memories with scientific knowledge.

      Chair

      • Masao Fukasawa, Professor, National Institute of Polar Research/Operating Executive Director, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology

      The ice sheet/glacier-ocean interaction in Greenland

      Sugiyama, Hokkaido University

      Our project studies changing ice sheet and glaciers in Greenland with a focus on ice-ocean interactions. We further investigate impact of ice and ocean changes on the life of indigenous people.

      Ecological changes and adaptation of the wildlife-human interaction in the Arctic under the global warming

      Tatsuzawa, Hokkaido University

      This project is detecting ecological changes of wild resource animals (especially reindeer) and their influences on the Arctic ecosystem and the northern indigenous peoples. By using of these data, we are trying to establish an adaptive wildlife management system (hunting/reserve areas) for the coexistence of the Arctic flora, fauna and local peoples.

      Constructing of teaching materials of environment education related to local history in Siberia synthesizing cultural memories with scientific knowledge

      Goto, Hokkaido University

      The purpose of this project is to return the scientific knowledge on environment change to the related stakeholders in Sakha (Yakutia) including indigenous peoples.

      Arctic Security: Unilateralizing Arctic Security – National Security, Military Policies, Defense Strategies, and State Sovereignty in the Globalized Arctic

      Organized by the Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security (26. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 17:15-18:45

      Location: Silfurberg A, Harpa Second Level

      This session will discuss national security and military policies, and defense strategies of the Arctic states, as well as militarization of the Arctic as a part of the region’s geopolitics.

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      The Thematic Network (TN) on Geopolitics and Security will, again, organize an international academic expert panel on “Security of the Arctic” including three breakout sessions with themes from theorizing and unilateralizing Arctic security and national security and military policies to redefining the new nexus of Arctic security. Security will be discussed theoretically and holistically from many angles and disciplinary approaches, as well as in global, national, regional and pan-Arctic contexts. Each session will accommodate 4-5 speakers from all over the Arctic region, among them are Jonathan Markowitz from the USA, Annika Nilsson from Sweden, Alexander Sergunin from Russia.

      The session "Unilateralizing Arctic Security – National Security, Military Policies, Defense Strategies, and State Sovereignty in the Globalized Arctic" will also look at the Arctic and Arctic security from the point of view of a ‘win-win’ approach and through the lenses of China’s developing views.

      Speakers:

      • Valery Konyshev, Professor, Saint Petersburg State University: Russian Expert Community about Military Threats to Russia’s Security in the Arctic: Implications of the Ukrainian crisis
      • Mike Corgan, Associate Professor, University of Boston: Arctic Climate and the US Political Climate
      • Arttu Koskinen, University of Lapland, Finland: Tradition of Neutrality in the Finnish Security and Defence Policy after the Cold War
      • Marc Lanteigne, Senior Research Fellow (Asia), the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs: Looking for ‘Win-Win’: China’s Developing Views of Arctic Multilateralism
      • Sandra Maria Rodrigues Balão, Researcher, Universidade de Lisboa: The Militarization of the Arctic, the Nordic Military Pact and the 21st Century Arctic Geostrategic Game

      Moderator: Alexander Sergunin, Professor, Saint-Petersburg State University

      Global Arctic: The Resource Dynamics of the Urbanized Arctic

      Organized by the GlobalArctic Project and the Northern Research Forum (NRF) (26. August 2016)

      Saturday, October 8, 17:15-18:45

      Location: Silfurberg B, Harpa Second Level

      Global warming and subsequent rapid accessibility of the Arctic to natural resources exploitation and transport routes leads to its industrialization and urbanization.

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      In this session, we will take a comprehensive approach to the resource dynamics of the urbanized Arctic in the following ways:

      1. (Re)assessing and analyzing the likely development (scope, migration, housing, other changes of urban settlements in the Arctic) as a result of mass-scale utilization (e.g. mines, oil drilling) and the opening of the Arctic to natural resources exploitation and global transport, and role of TNCs and SOEs there;
      2. Assessing the consequences of such development on
        1. The national, regional and local economies, and national policies,
        2. Indigenous peoples and cultures,
        3. Sustainable development / resilience,
      3. Comparing the urbanized Arctic to rural Arctic with small communities.

      Speakers:

      • Melissa Harris, Project Manager, International Institute for Sustainable Development: Barriers and Best Practices for Sustainable Housing in the Canadian Arctic
      • Heather Nicol, Professor, Trent University: Resiliency in Northern Canada’s Communities Based upon Evaluating the Canadian Geographical Literature on Rural Reinvigoration and Governance Capacity
      • Rachael Lorna Johnstone, Professor of Law, University of Akureyri: Free, Prior and Informed Consent in Large-Scale Development Projects in the Arctic
      • “Greenland and the Arctic Council: Subnational regions in a time of Arctic Westphalianisation”
        • Inuuteq Holm Olsen, Minister Plenipotentiary, Greenland Representation, Danish Embassy in Washington, DC
        • Jessica M. Shadian, Senior Fellow, Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, University of Toronto; Nansen Professor, University of Akureyri
      • Matthias Finger, Professor, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale Lausanne (EPFL): Governments Helping TNCs to Grab Arctic Resources

      Moderator

      Lassi Heininen, Professor, University of Lapland

      Arctic High Seas - Building Common Interests in the Arctic Ocean

      Organized by Arctic Options (16. August 2016)

      Sunday, October 9, 16:30-18:30

      Location: Kaldalón, Harpa First Level

      The session aims to facilitate international, interdisciplinary and inclusive dialogue to build common interests in the Arctic high seas with regard to fishing, shipping, scientific research and area protection in context of the law of the sea.

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      The discussion points include:

      • Water Column Beyond National Jurisdictions
      • Research in the Central Arctic Ocean
      • Potential Fisheries in the Central Arctic Ocean
      • Potential Transpolar Trade Route
      • Potential Area Protection in the Central Arctic Ocean

      Speakers:

      • Kristina M. Gjerde, J.D., Senior High Seas Advisor, International Union for Conservation for Nature, United States
      • Christine Provost, Senior Scientist, Laboratoire d'Océanographie et du Climat, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, France
      • Joji Morishita, Professor, Department of Marine Policy and Culture; Head, Japanese delegation to A5+5 Meeting on High Seas Fisheries in the Central Arctic Ocean, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Japan
      • Alexander N. Vylegzhanin, Director, International Law Programme, MGIMO University, Russian Federation
      • Eero Hokkanen, Communications Manager, Arctia Ltd., Finland

      Co-Chairs: 

      • Paul Arthur Berkman,  Professor Practice in Science Diplomacy, Tufts University, United States; Director, Arctic Futures Initiative, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis
      • Oran R. Young, Professor Emeritus, University of California Santa Barbara, United States

      Sustainable Regional Development in the Nordic Arctic

      Organized by Nordregio (12. September 2016)

      Sunday, October 9, 16:30-18:30

      Location: Ríma A, Harpa First Level

      The Breakout session will focus on the main findings and results from the project Foresight Analysis for Sustainable Regional Development in the Nordic Arctic, commissioned by the Nordic Working Group for Sustainable Regional Development in the Arctic.

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      The purpose of the project has been to assess opportunities and challenges for sustainable regional development in the Nordic Arctic and to identify future development perspectives. This provides more comprehensive knowledge, and input for development of the Nordic Arctic policy. A foresight analysis has been carried out in three stages with participation from communities, regions and national authorities. Through a series of workshops the participants contributed with their perspectives on potentials and challenges for future sustainable regional development in the Nordic Arctic. The objective of this process is to create a foundation for action, focusing on the opportunities that become evident from the analyses.

      Photo by Mia Bennett / Cryopolitics

      Speakers:

      • Anna Karlsdóttir, Senior Research Fellow at Nordregio: Bringing the message through from dialogues in local regions to national and Interregional policy level.
      • Leneisja Jungsberg, Research Fellow at Nordregio: Community involvement and youth perspectives on the future in the Nordic Arctic.
      • "New business opportunities – bio-economy, tourism and creative industries in the Nordic Arctic."
        • Lise Smed Olsen, Research Fellow at Nordregio
        • Anna Berlina, Research Fellow at Nordregio
      • Tim Heleniak, Senior Research Fellow at Nordregio: Newcomers to the North: International Migration into the Arctic.

      Climate Refugees, Diaspora and Tourism in the North Atlantic Gateway to the Arctic

      Organized by the Northgate network and the Centre for Arctic Policy Studies (CAPS) at the University of Iceland (26. August 2016)

      Sunday, October 9, 16:30-18:30

      Location: Ríma B, Harpa First Level

      The effects of climate change include unforeseen, and hitherto underrepresented, changes in human mobility within and into the Arctic through tourism, industries and migration.

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      These factors create new challenges to governance and the well-being of local communities, as well as enhance the danger of over-exploiting the sensitive vegetation and animal life of Arctic and sub-Arctic areas. This panel will discuss dimensions of these emerging challenges such as adapting infrastructure and the legal environment to increased mobility, the ambiguous status of climate refugees, local views on cohabiting with tourists and the attraction of Arctic and ‘green tourism’ in many middle class populations of the world, including Asia. Discussions will focus on the West-Nordic/North Atlantic context and the Northgate network’s goals of providing policy-relevant knowledge and creating a communication platform between academics, policy makers and local communities.

      Speakers:

      • Kristinn Schram, Assistant Professor in Ethnology, University of Iceland: The Northgate Network: Sociocultural Aspects of Climate Change.
      • Lau Øfjord Blaxekjær, Assistant Professor and Programme Director, University of the Faroe Islands: How Can West Nordic Diplomacy Respond to the Pressures from Climate Change, Migration, and New Business Opportunities?
      • Erna Kristín Blöndal, Director, Nordic Institute for Migration: Fleeing Because of Climate Change – Environmental Factors and Migration.
      • Guðrún Þóra Gunnarsdóttir, Director, Icelandic Tourism Research Centre: Sharing Space with Tourism.
      • Marc Lanteigne, Senior Research Fellow, NUPI: Suitcase Diplomacy: Soft Power and Asian Tourism in the Arctic.

      Chair

      • Kristinn Schram, Assistant Professor in Ethnology, University of Iceland; Academic Coordinator, Northgate

      Cold Climate Technologies for Sustainable Arctic Communities

      Organized by the United States Department of Commerce, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) and the Institute of the North (26. August 2016)

      Sunday, October 9, 16:30-18:30

      Location: Skarðsheiði, Harpa Third Level

      This session will survey some of the environmental challenges and key technologies that are critical to advancements in the Arctic across multiple sectors, with a special focus on improving access to quality housing in the Arctic.

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      Speakers will look at how products can be deployed in the extreme temperature and weather and across vast distances for community development, commercial and residential development, scientific research, safety and rescue, and environmental preservation. Participants will examine data, energy, new cold-climate technologies, and what research and development challenges remain.

      A portion of the panel be devoted to particular implications for housing policies, which includes the increased need for heating fuel and its high costs in the North. Residents in Arctic regions live in harsh climatic conditions but do not always have centralized access to heating, high quality housing materials or proper insulation. In addition, these regions are increasingly affected by climate change. A number of initiatives focusing on environmental sustainability of communities, energy efficiency and renewable energy generation have emerged in recent years. A key question today is how to scale up these initiatives to ensure they are making a difference in the life of Arctic communities. This panel will present new research on sustainable housing in the Arctic with a focus on design, management, financing, enabling policies and implementation. Speakers will examine the role of governments, experts, communities and other stakeholders in scaling-up best practices and innovative solutions.

      Panelists

      • Gwen Holdmann, Director, Alaska Center for Energy & Power: Lab Services for Remote Micro Grid Technology & Deployment.
      • Larry Cash, FAIA NCARB, President and CEO, RIM Architects of Alaska: Designing for the Arctic Environment.
      • Elizabeth Pierce, CEO, Quintillion Networks: The Role of Data in Development, Both Community and Commercial
      • Nils Andreassen, Executive Director, Institute of the North: Lessons Learned from Alaskan Experience: A Review of Best Practices
      • Suzanne Cassolato, Research Engineer, Natural Resources Canada: Integrating Innovative Technologies into Shelters for Remote Northern Locations
      • Alec Khachatrian, Consultant, IISD: Barriers and Best Practices for Sustainable Housing Delivery Models
      • Lars Nelson, Vice President of UIC Lands, Ukpeaġvik Iñupiat Corporation: Infrastructure in the Alaskan Arctic - Barrow, Alaska

      Co-Chairs

      • Mead Treadwell, President, PT Capital
      • Melissa Harris, Senior Researcher, IISD

      The North Atlantic Energy Network

      Organized by the Nordic Atlantic Cooperation (NORA) committee of the Nordic Council of Ministers and Bellona (26. August 2016)

      Sunday, October 9, 16:30-18:30

      Location: Akrafjall, Harpa Fourth Level

      Growing global energy demand has contributed to the increasing interest in the Arctic, mostly due to its oil and gas resources. However, the Arctic also has an abundance of underutilized renewable energy sources such as wind, thermal, hydro and tidal, which lacks the infrastructure necessary for export.

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      The subsea cable technology required to build interconnectors in the North Atlantic already exists. The IceLink project, a proposed subsea cable between Iceland and the UK, is conceptually the most advanced initiative in a North Atlantic context, and earlier this year, the National Energy Authority of Iceland published a report on a potential North Atlantic Energy Network. A sister publication, funded by NORA, is expected shortly.

      The realization of subsea cable projects in the North Atlantic will be expensive and depend on political decisions, both in the North Atlantic and in Europe. Arctic Circle 2016 would be an ideal arena to discuss the green energy potential and the political and economic benefits and challenges of a North Atlantic Energy Network. With the ongoing green energy acceleration, it is interesting and timely, particularly in a post-Paris context, to highlight the potential role the Arctic as a green battery for Europe.

      Speakers:

      • Erla Björk Þorgeirsdóttir, Project Manager, Orkustofnun – National Energy Authority, Iceland: Key Findings: North Atlantic Energy Network 1.
      • Björgvin Skúli Sigurðsson, Executive Vice President, Marketing and Business Development, Landsvirkjun – National Power Company, Iceland: IceLink Benefits and Challenges.
      • Meinhard Eliasen, Energy Adviser, Faroese Energy Authority: The Faroese Connection: Benefits and Challenges.
      • Sigurd Enge, Manager, Shipping, Marine and the Arctic, the Bellona Foundation, Norway: Renewable Energy and Grid Development in the Arctic: the Svalbard Case.
      • Anders Kofoed-Wiuff, Partner, Ea Energy Analysis, Denmark: the Role of Interconnectors in the Low Carbon Transition
      • Magni Laksáfoss, Managing Director, VITorka: An Economist’s View on Utilising Green Energy in Faroe Islands

      Chair:

      • Bogi Bech Jensen, Professor of Energy Engineering; President of Glasir – Tórshavn College, Faroe Islands

      Panelists:

      • Angus MacNeil, MP, Chair of Select Committee on Energy and Climate Change, House of Commons, UK
      • Guðni A. Jóhannesson, Director General, Orkustofnun – National Energy Authority, Iceland
      • Magni Laksafoss, Economic Analyst and MP, Faroe Islands
      • Anders Kofoed-Wiuff, Partner, Ea Energy Analysis, Denmark Frederic Haug, Founder and President, Bellona, Norway

      High North Atlantic Shipping and Trade

      Organized by Ramboll, Eimskip, Maine Port Authority, Troms County Council (26. August 2016)

      Sunday, October 9, 16:30-18:30

      Location: Esja, Harpa Fifth Level

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      • Sara Pálsdóttir, Key Account Manager, Eimskip
      • John Henshaw, CEO, Maine Port Authority
      • Gunnar Davíðsson, Department Manager, Troms County Council

      Chair

      • Nils Arne Johnsen, Arctic Director, Ramboll

      Polar Law: the Law of the Sea - Navigation

      Organized by the University of Akureyri (15. August 2016)

      Sunday, October 9, 16:30-18:30

      Location: Háaloft, Harpa Eighth Level

      This session assesses the legal norms pertaining to shipping in the Arctic.

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      It addresses, inter alia, domestic implementation of the Polar Code; the extent of States’ rights to govern international navigation according to the law of the sea; States’ management of new challenges from cruise ships; and the relationship between the rights of Coastal States and Flag States in the negotiations leading to the Polar Code, with emphasis on the ambiguous status of article 234.

      Speakers:

      • Alexander Sergunin, Professor of International Relations, St. Petersburg State University: Implementing the IMO’s Polar Code: the Case of Russia.
      • Valery Konyshev, Professor of International Relations at the St. Petersburg State University: International legal status of the Northern Sea Route: Discussions in the Western and Russian Expert Communities
      • Suzanne Lalonde, Professor of Law, University of Montreal: Cruising the Northwest Passage: What Can We Learn from the Management of the Crystal Serenity Voyage
      • Dorottya Bognar, PhD Candidate, UiT – The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø: The “Elephant in the Room”: Article 234 of the Law of the Sea Convention and the Polar Code as an Incompletely Theorized Agreement.

      Chair:

      • Timo Koivurova, Professor of Law, Director of the Arctic Centre, University of Lapland

      Arctic Security: (Re)Defining the New Nexus of Arctic Security – Resources, Energy, the Environment, Climate Change, Regional Development and Regional Security Complexes

      Organized by the Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security (26. August 2016)

      Sunday, October 9, 16:30-18:30

      LocationBjörtuloft, Harpa Fifth Level

      This session will discuss on the one hand, special features of Arctic security such as environmental security and how climate change could test theories of resource competition, and on the other hand, it will reveal the scalar politics of Arctic security.

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      The Thematic Network (TN) on Geopolitics and Security will, again, organize an international academic expert panel on “Security of the Arctic” including three breakout sessions with themes from theorizing and unilateralizing Arctic security and national security and military policies to redefining the new nexus of Arctic security. Security will be discussed theoretically and holistically from many angles and disciplinary approaches, as well as in global, national, regional and pan-Arctic contexts. Each session will accommodate 4-5 speakers from all over the Arctic region, among them are Jonathan Markowitz from the USA, Annika Nilsson from Sweden, Alexander Sergunin from Russia.

      The session "(Re)Defining the New Nexus of Arctic Security – Resources, Energy, the Environment, Climate Change, Regional Development and Regional Security Complexes" will also discuss whether the Arctic could be considered as a regional Security Complex. Finally, Arctic marine governance will be discussed via two sub-regions, the Barents Sea area and the Pacific North.

      Speakers:

      • Maria Lagutina, Professor, St. Petersburg State University: Environmental Conflicts in the Arctic: a Myth or Reality?
      • Jonathan N. Markowitz, Assistant Professor, School of International Relations, University of Southern California: Arctic Shock: Utilizing Climate Change to Test Theories of Resource Competition
      • Barbora Padrtová, PhD Student, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic: The Arctic Regional Security Complex? From Theory to Reality
      • “The Scalar Politics of Arctic Security”:
        • Annika E. Nilsson, Senior Research Fellow, Stockholm Environment Institute; Affiliated Faculty, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
        • Miyase Christensen, Professor of Media and Communicaiton Studies, Stockholm University; Guest Professor, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
      • Rasmus Bertelsen, Professor, University of Tromsø – Norway’s Arctic University: Two Cases of Arctic Marine Governance in the International System: the Barents Sea and the Pacific Arctic

      Moderator: Lassi Heininen, Professor, University of Lapland, Finland