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Breakout Sessions at the 2017 Assembly

Breakout Sessions are organized by the respective partners of the Arctic Circle, organizations, institutions, companies, think tanks, universities, or other bodies.

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Food and Agriculture Opportunities in South Greenland – Under A Changing Climate

Organized by Aarhus University, Department of Agroecology (5. October 2017)

Saturday, October 14, 16:00 - 17:30
Location: Norðurljós, Second Level

Speakers:

  • C. K. Madsen, Greenland National Museum & Archives: The history of the cultural landscape in South Greenland
  • Kenneth Høgh, Kujalleq kommune: Present day agriculture
  • Jørgen E. Olesen, Professor, AU AGRO: Future climate in South Greenland
  • Mogens H. Greve, AU AGRO: Climate adaption of Greenland Agriculture
  • Martin Marko Hansen, Mayers Madhus: A taste of Greenland, Food Opportunities in south Greenland

Polar law: Reliable Catch Data: A Crucial Precondition for Sustainable Ocean Resource Management

Organized by the Polar Law Institute (8. October 2017)

Friday, October 13, 17:55 - 19:25
Location: Þjóðmenningarhúsið, Hverfisgata 15

Speakers:

  • Eva Varheim, Senior Advisor, Norwegian Directorate of Fisheries
  • Hjalti Ómar Ágústsson, Polar Law Institute, University of Akureyri
  • Jóhann Ásmundsson, Polar Law Institute, University of Akureyri
  • Hilmar Ögmundsson, Senior Advisor, Ministry of Finance, Greenland

 

Chair:

Demian Schane, Fulbright Research Scholar at the University of Akureyri           

The Future of Arctic Infrastructure: Developing sustainability standards and valuing natural assets

Organized by WWF and the Natural Capital Project (13. September 2017)

$1 trillion in new infrastructure investment in the Arctic is expected in the coming decades. There is still an opportunity to plan, finance, design, site, and build this infrastructure to be sustainable and resilient. This is vital to creating a sustainable blue economy in the Arctic that achieves the Sustainable Development Goals, supporting human well-being and economic prosperity over the long term. 

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Saturday, October 14, 08:00 - 09:00
Location: Skarðsheiði, Third Level

 

This session will explore the potential for standards and tools to help shape responsible development and investment in the Arctic. Specifically, the interactive discussion will focus on how to co-develop and adapt to the Arctic context: 1) global standards for sustainable and resilient infrastructure and 2) ecosystem service assessment tools. The session will explore how to ensure they are fit for purpose in the Arctic, reflecting local knowledge, values and development goals.

Participants will:

  • Learn about the SuRe© Standard for Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure, developed by Global Infrastructure Basel (GIB) Foundation and Natixis.
  • Provide input on the potential for application of SuRe© in the Arctic context and how the Standard needs to be adapted.
  • Learn about early designs for investment decision support tools to help mainstream considerations of natural assets, biodiversity, ecosystem services and climate in development planning and infrastructure financing in the Arctic.
  • Give input on the most important natural assets and ecosystem services that are valued by people in the Arctic that will feed into a first draft list of ecosystem services to be further co-developed and included in Arctic infrastructure sustainability standards and assessment tools.

Speakers:

  • Emily McKenzie, Chief Adviser – Economics and Sustainability, WWF Global Science: Operationalizing Blue Economy Principles for Sustainable Infrastructure in the Arctic
  • Katharina Schneider-Roos, CEO, Global Infrastructure Basel (GIB) Foundation: The SuRe© Standard for Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure
  • Spencer Wood, Lead Scientist, Natural Capital Project, University of Washington: Developing decision support tools for communities, governments and investors
  • Discussant: Jim Pass, Senior Managing Director, Municipal and Infrastructure Sector Manager and Portfolio Manager

Chair:

Brad Ack, Senior Vice President, Oceans, WWF-US

Toward A Holistic Bio-Socio-Economic Pan-Arctic Fisheries Assessment

Organized by the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) (5. October 2017)

Saturday, October 14, 17:30 - 19:00
Location: Akrafjall, Fourth Level

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Speakers:

  • Mikko Heino, Professor, University of Bergen: Ecology and Evolution of Sustainable Exploitation of Fish Stocks
  • Ulf Dieckmann, Program Director, IIASA: Reconciling Societal Objectives and Stakeholder Interests in Integrated Fisheries Assessments
  • Rachel Tiller, Research Scientist, SINTEF: Reducing Uncertainty in Climate-Change Scenario Development Through Transdisciplinary Integration of Qualitative Stakeholder Data in Decision-Support Systems
  • Petr Havlík, Senior Research Scholar, IIASA: An Integrated Economic Model of Global Fisheries, Aquaculture, and Agriculture

Arctic Youth and Sustainable Futures: Case Studies and Focus Groups from across the Arctic

Organized by Stefansson Arctic Institute and the University of Akureyri (14. September 2017)


The Arctic Youth and Sustainable Futures project (2016-2018) is a circumpolar project that seeks to fill a gap in knowledge identified in the work of the Arctic Human Development Report: Regional Processes and Global Linkages (2015). It seeks to fill a gap in knowledge on the needs and aspirations of young people in the Arctic, with a primary focus on youth, ages 18-24.

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Saturday, October 14, 16:00 - 17:30

The premise of the research is that the future of the Arctic will be determined to a great extent by today’s youth, as they make choices around the opportunities and challenges they face, their priorities in terms of culture and identities, where to study and where to live, and what occupations and lifestyles to pursue, as well as on factors affecting their social and physical environment, such as the impacts and responses to climate change and economic and cultural globalization. Preliminary results from case study work and focus group interviews will be presented. The presentations will present highlights from discussions with youth.
A general focus is on questions of the two to three most pressing issues facing young people living in the Arctic regions today, the aspirations and needs of young people in the Arctic, and discussions with youth to better understand how young people define the most important issues that affect their lives in the Arctic today, as well as their hopes and aspirations for the future. The focus group research has enabled the project to capture a variety of views, experiences and circumstances among young people in the North. The session will present results from case studies and a first round of focus group interviews with young people from different parts of the Arctic, including Northern Iceland; Nuuk, Greenland; Bodø, Norway; Umeå, Sweden; Northern Finland; Murmansk, Russia; and Alaska.

Speakers:

  • Joan Nymand Larsen, Professor of Economics and Arctic Studies, University of Akureyri; Senior Scientist, Stefansson Arctic Institute, Akureyri, Iceland
  • Diane Hirshberg, Professor of Education Policy, and Director, Center for Alaska Education Policy Research Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, USA
  • Andrey Petrov, Associate Professor of Geography and Geospatial Technology, University of Northern Iowa, USA
  • Jón Haukur Ingimundarson, Senior Scientist, Stefansson Arctic Institute, and Associate Professor of Anthropology and Arctic Studies, University of Akureyri
  • Marta Einarsdóttir, Researcher, University of Akureyri Research Centre, Iceland
  • Leneisja Jungsberg, Research Fellow, Nordregio, Sweden
  • Anna Karlsdóttir, Senior Research Fellow, Nordregio, Sweden
  • Timothy Heleniak, Senior Research Fellow, Nordregio, Sweden
  • Joan Nymand Larsen, Professor of Economics and Arctic Studies, University of Akureyri; Senior Scientist, Stefansson Arctic Institute
  • Jón Haukur Ingimundarson, Senior Scientist, Stefansson Arctic Institute; Associate Professor of Anthropology and Arctic Studies, University of Akureyri, Iceland.

Chairs:

  • Joan Nymand Larsen, Senior Scientist and Research Director, Stefansson Arctic Institute & Professor, University of Akureyri
  • Jón Haukur Ingimundarson, Senior Scientist, Stefansson Arctic Institute; Associate Professor, University of Akureyri, Iceland

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and in the Arctic

Organized by: Polar Research and Policy Initiative and the Icelandic Ministry for Foreign Affairs (14. September 2017)


When we think or talk about the Arctic in the world at large, we often focus on themes such as rising temperatures, melting ice caps, thawing permafrost and threatened polar bear populations. This is entirely understandable, and our concern is wholly legitimate; yet, it neglects the critical human dimension and, thus, paints an incomplete picture of the Arctic.

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Saturday, October 14, 11:20 - 12:20
Location: Silfurberg, Second Level

 

The Arctic, unlike the Antarctic, is home to Indigenous and Northern peoples whose lives and livelihoods are affected by the changes around them and who have needs, challenges and aspirations like any other. In fact, all 17 SDGs are relevant to the Arctic, and it is only the lexicon of the SDGs that can capture in the most holistic manner the issues faced by peoples across the circumpolar North. Through this session, we hope to encourage policymakers, academics and journalists to integrate more effectively within their Arctic discourse and agenda a focus on the SDGs, whereby climate security remains an integral goal, but without an accompanying neglect of issues such as energy, food and water security, as well as access to education, healthcare, employment, housing, transport, infrastructure and telecommunication.

Speakers:

  • Sturla Sigurjónsson, Permanent secretary of state, Iceland: the Opening Address
  • Aleqa Hammond, Former Premier of Greenland
  • Tony Penikett, Former Premier of Yukon
  • María Mjöll Jónsdóttir, Director on UN Affairs and Gender Equality, Icelandic Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Iceland)
  • Mitchell White, Jane Glassco Northern Fellowship Alumni, Gordon Foundation (Canada)
  • Heather Nicol, Professor, Trent University (Canada)
  • Timo Koivurova, Director and Research Professor, Arctic Centre, University of Lapland (Finland)
  • Jeremy Rayner, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)
  • Dwayne Ryan Menezes, Director, Polar Research and Policy Initiative (UK): Closing Address

Chair:

Dalee Sambo Dorough, Former Chair of UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues; Associate Professor, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Arctic Freshwater Resource Dynamics and Socio-Environmental Challenges: Towards An Interdisciplinary Project

Organized by Western Kentucky University, University of Akureyri, the Icelandic Arctic Cooperation Network, the Icelandic Meteorological Office, the Marine and Freshwater Institute, and the Icelandic Centre for Research (5. October 2017)

Saturday, October 14, 11:20 - 12:20
Location: Akrafjall, Fourth Level

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Speakers

  • Thorsteinn Gunnarsson, Senior Adviser, Icelandic Centre for Research - Rannis: Observing and Monitoring the Arctic Freshwater System
  • Thorsteinn Thorsteinsson, Glaciologist at the Icelandic Meteorological Office: The Global Cryosphere Watch in the Arctic
  • Jason S. Polk, Associate Professor of Geography and Geology, Western Kentucky University: Insights from Melting Ice: Using Glacial Rivers to Understand Climate Change, Weathering, and Water Resource Issues
  • Jill R. Welter, Associate Professor of Biology Endowed Chair in the Sciences, St. Catherine University: Human Activities in the Arctic: Consequences for Freshwater Ecosystems and their Connection to the Sea
  • Jónína S. Þorláksdóttir, Rif Field Station, Northeast Iceland: Learning by doing: Using experience for establishing, implementing and harmonizing freshwater monitoring efforts in the Arctic
  • Steingrímur Jónsson, Professor, University of Akureyri; Scientist, Marine and Freshwater Research Institute in Iceland: The Ocean Around Iceland; How is it Affected By Climate Variability and Climate Change
  • Leslie A. North, Associate Professor of Environmental Studies, Western Kentucky University, Center for Human GeoEnvironmental Studies (CHNGES), Department of Geography and Geology: Misconceptions and Realities of Freshwater Resources in a Changing Climate: Engaging Community Through Effective Communication

Chair

Embla Eir Oddsdottir, Director, Icelandic Arctic Cooperation Network (IACN)

Main Business and the Arctic - Building Relationships

Organized by the Maine Department of Transportation (5. October 2017)

Friday, October 13, 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Björtuloft, Fifth Level

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Speakers

  • David Bernhardt, Commissioner, Maine Department of Transportation: Building Relationships in the Transportation Sector: Building Relationships in the Transportation Sector
  • Larus Isfeld, Managing Director & Executive Vice President, Eimskip USA: Building Relationships: Eimskip and Maine
  • Peter Handy, President & CEO, Bristol Seafood: Building Relationships in the Fisheries Sector
  • Mark Hopkins, Business Development, Hancock Lumber: Maine Building Materials In The Arctic Patrick Arnold, Co-Founder & CEO, New England Ocean Cluster: Building Relationships: Iceland and Maine

Chair

  • Dana Eidsness, Director, Maine North Atlantic Development Office (MENADO), Maine International Trade Center: Developing Trade Relationships in the North Atlantic

Arctic Security Roundtable

Organized by the Munich Security Conference (8. October 2017)

Friday, October 13, 17:55 - 19:55

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Ilulissat – Infrastructure as a Start Point For Further Growth

Organized by Landsvirkjun Power, ISTAK, EFLA, Verkís & Mannvit (5. October 2017)

Saturday, October 14, 11:20 - 12:20
Location: Björtuloft, Fifth Level 

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Speakers:

  • Þorvaldur Guðjónsson, ISTAK: The Ilulissat hydropower plant planning and construction history: Implementatio of a Hydropower Plant Under Extreme Arctic Conditions
  • Svend Hardenberg, Director, Mannvit Greenland: Challenges of Switching to Local Green Energy in a Small Isolated Community: Impact of The Implementation of Hydropower For Local People and Local Industry Such as Fisheries and Tourism
  • Svend Hardenberg, Director, Mannvit Greenland: First-hand experience: How the Implementation of the Ilulissat Hydropower Plant Impacted the Local Community With Increased Tourism
  • Ragnheiður Elín Árnadóttir, Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Center; former Minister of Industry and Commerce of Iceland: Looking further – How to Create the Conditions For Sustainable Development of Such Societies?: Infrastructures and Legal Framework Required to Create Sustainable Conditions for Development, Fisheries, and Other Industries

Chair:

Ragnheiður Elín Árnadóttir

Maine Business and The Arctic - Building Academic Exchange

Organized by the Maine Department of Transportation (5. October 2017)

Saturday, October 14, 11:20 - 12:20
Location: Háaloft, Eighth Level

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Speakers:

  • Glenn Cummings, President, University of Southern Maine: Academic Exchange: University of Southern Maine to Reykjavik University
  • Barry Costa-Pierce, Chair, Department of Marine Science, University of New England: A New North Atlantic Education: Training Program in Ocean Food Systems
  • Jay Friedlander, Professor, College of the Atlantic: Maine and the Arctic: Creating Solutions through Academic Exchange
  • Ögmundur Knútsson, Dean, The School of Business and Science, University of Akureyr: The Global Fishing Village: The Need for Education and Networking
  • Ari Jónson, President, Reykjavik University: Academic Exchange: Reykjavik University to University of Southern Maine

Chair:

John Henshaw, President, North Atlantic Ports Association.

Climate justice – the moral imperative to act. Faith leaders in dialogue with science and decision makers

Organized by the World Council of Churches and the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Iceland (5. October 2017)

Saturday, October 14, 16:00 - 17:30
Location: Þjóðmenningarhúsið, Hverfisgata 15

 

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Opening Remarks by His ALL-Holiness Ecumenical Orthodox Patriarch Bartholomew I


Panel

  • Anders Wejryd, Archbishop Emeritus of the Church of Sweden, European President of the World Council of Churches
  • Clarisse Kehler Siebert, International lawyer and research fellow at the Stockholm Environment Institute
  • Rev. Rodney Petersen, PhD, Executive Director of Cooperative Metropolitan Ministries and Visiting Researcher, Boston University School of Theology
  • Halldór Björnsson, the Group leader of Weather and Climate Research, Icelandic Met. Office

Chair:

Ögmundur Jónasson, Former Minister of Health and Interior, Iceland

Increasing International Cooperation on Arctic Science Via Ministerial Meetings

Organized by the European Commission Directorate General of Research & Innovation, the Ministry for Education and Culture of Finland, the Ministry for Education and Research of Germany and the United States Arctic Research Commission (5. October 2017)

Saturday, October 14, 16:00 - 17:30
Location: Silfurberg A, Second Level

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Speakers

  • Fran Ulmer, Vice-Chair of the White House Arctic Science Ministerial, and Chair of the United States Arctic Research Commission: The Arctic Science Ministerial 2016: Why was it held and what was its goal
  • Martin Jeffries, Assistant Director of Polar Science, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy: Organizing an Arctic Science Ministerial: Lessons Learned and Best Practices
  • Andrea Tilche, Head of Climate Action and Earth Observation Unit of the European Commission, DG Research & Innovation; Member of the EU Delegation for the 2018 Arctic Science Ministerial: The Arctic Science Ministerial 2018: Objectives and Goals
  • Wilfried Kraus, Head of directorate Sustainability, Climate, Energy, Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Germany: Germany’s Contribution to International Science Collaboration in the Arctic
  • Tapio Kosunen, Director General, Ministry of Education and Culture, Finland: How Arctic Science Has Been Advanced in the Work of the Arctic Council.
  • Gunn-Britt Retter, Head of the Arctic and Environment Unit, Saami Council: Some Reflections on why Traditional Indigenous Knowledge Matters for Science Ministers

Expanding Arctic Indigenous Collaborations

Organized by Ukpeaġvik Iñupiat Corporation (UIC) (5. October 2017)

Saturday, October 14, 16:00 - 17:30
Location: Skarðsheiði, Third Level

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Speakers:

  • Lars Nelson, Ukpeaġvik Iñupiat Corporation Vice President of Lands: Connecting the American Arctic – Barrow, Alaska
  • Mike Sfraga, Wilson Center, Polar Initiative Director: The Future Arctic: Indigenous Communities as Essential Drivers of Economic and Social Success
  • Alice Rogoff, Arctic Now, Founder: Importance of Community-Based Development
  • “Constructive Collaborations Between Indigenous Peoples and the Researchers”
    • Nagruk Harcharek, UIC Science, General Manager
    • Harry K. Brower Jr., North Slope Borough Mayor
  • Catherine Coral Simons, Department of Transportation Committee on the Marine Transportation System, Senior Maritime Infrastructure Advisor: Infrastructure Policy & Finance: Arctic Spotlight
  • Halldór Jóhannsson, Arctic Portal Executive Director (Iceland): Arctic Cooperation and Business Development Driven by Knowledge and Effective Information Exchange
  • Joseph Ahmaogak, Olgoonik,Chairman of the Board of Directors: A View from a Traditional Whaling Village
  • Anders Oskal, International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry Executive Director: Unique Cross-Border Cooperation Between Arctic Reindeer Peoples

Stories That Need To Be Told In North Atlantic & Arctic Media

Organized by JONAA: Eyewitness the Emerging North (5. October 2017)

Saturday, October 14, 17:30 - 19:00
Location: Björtuloft, Fifth Level 

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Speakers:

  • Vilborg Einarsdottir, Editor-in-Chief, JoNAA
  • Nils Arne Johnsen, Arctic Director, Ramboll
  • Dana Eidsness, Director Maine North Atlantic Development Office, MENADO
  • Inga Dora Markussen, Secretary General, West Nordic Council
  • Hlín Johannesdottir, Managing Editor, JoNAA
  • Joachim Weidemann, Europe Affairs editor, JoNAA & Director of JoNAA Monitoring

Community Mapping the Arctic

Organized by: Anchorage Museum, Lateral North (5. October 2017)

Sunday, October 15, 08:00 - 09:00
Location: Skarðsheiði, Third Level

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SPEAKERS

  • Julie Decker, Director of the Anchorage Museum, Alaska
  • Graham Hogg, Lateral North, Scotland

New nexus of Arctic security – from elimination of environmental damage to regional security

Organized by: NRF-UArctic Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security (13. September 2017)

Sunday, October 15, 12:45 - 13:45

In security studies, there are discourses, premises and paradigms of security, as well as discussion who are the subjects of security. When it comes to the Arctic region there are on the one hand, heavy military (nuclear weapon) structures of the Russian Federation and the USA, and the other hand, special features of security, e.g. nuclear safety, as well as ‘new’ security threats, e.g. long-range pollution and climate change threating human security.

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Sunday, October 15, 12:45 - 13:45

In spite of this, there in the Arctic is high geopolitical stability based on resilient international and interregional cooperation between the Arctic states and globally, which is a precondition for environmental protection, sustainable development and regional security. This session will discuss how the ‘militarized’ Arctic has been ‘environmentalized’ by growing concern on the environment, and how security has been reconceptualized when the environment matters. It will concentrate on environmental impacts by the military, as both a universal and special feature of Arctic security, and how to clean-up after a ‘party’ (the arms race of the Cold War) and eliminate environmental damage in Northern regions.


Speaker: 

  • Lassi Heininen, Professor, University of Lapland: Environmental Impacts and Risks of the Military, in Peacetime – an Overview
  • Michael Byers, Professor & Canada Research Chair, Department of Political Science, University of British Columbia: Toxic Splash: Russian Rocket-Stages Dumped in Arctic Waters Raise Health and Environmental Concerns
  • Anatoly Shevchuk, Deputy Chairman of the SOPS VAVT under the Ministry of Economic Development, Professor of RANEPA, Academician of REA: Evaluation and elimination of accumulated ecological damage in the Russian Arctic zone
  • Alexander Sergunin, Professor, St. Petersburg State University: The Changing Role of Military Power in the High North

Moderator:

  • Heather Exner-Pirot, Strategist for Outreach and Indigenous Engagement, University of Saskatchewan, Managing Editor, Arctic Yearbook

Adapting power production to a changing climate

Organized by Landsvirkjun, the National Power Company of Iceland (29. September 2017)

Iceland produces electricity exclusively from renewable resources, with no connection to other systems. Over 70% of Icelandic power is produced from hydro resources and climate change is already affecting utilization rates. 

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Friday, October 13, 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Silfurberg, Second Level

For the past 30 years, Landsvirkjun and the University of Iceland’s Institute of Earth Sciences have researched Iceland’s glaciers in order to assess and understand how they change with altering weather conditions. How prepared are we to adapt to changing conditions? Does climate change threaten the resilience and reliability of Iceland’s hydropower system or are there potential opportunities for increased energy production?  Are there lessons to be learned by other subarctic communities with isolated, heavily renewable power systems?

Speakers:

  • Marco Braun, Ouranos- Responding to the Inevitable: Building Climate Resilience into the Energy Sector
  • Úlfar Linnet: How Climate Affects Renewable Energy Production in Iceland
  • Ragna Árnadóttir: Decision Making in an Uncertain Future: Climate Change and its Effect on System Planning

 

The Evolution of the China-Nordic Arctic Cooperation

Organized by: The China-Nordic Arctic Research Center (CNARC) (5. September 2017)

The China-Nordic Research Center (CNARC) was established in Shanghai on 10th December 2013 by ten Member Institutes, four Chinese and six Nordic, which all have capacities to influence and coordinate Arctic research. 

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Friday, October 13, 17:55 - 19:25
Location: Esja, Fifth Level

CNARC’s purpose is twofold: 1) to increase awareness, understanding and knowledge of the Arctic and its global impacts and 2) to promote cooperation for sustainable development of the Nordic Arctic and coherent development of China in a global context. Now the CNARC has fourteen member institutes and has hosted a range of activities, including five rounds of the annual China-Nordic Arctic Cooperation Symposium and CNARC Roundtable on an economic and cultural matter of strategic significance, four rounds of the CNARC Fellowship exchange of scholars between Chinese and Nordic institutes, as well as a joint China-Nordic Arctic book project is underway. This session will introduce the evolution of the China-Nordic Arctic Cooperation, and explore new frontiers for the CNARC cooperation.

Speakers:

  • Yang Huigen, Director-General, Polar Research Institute of China and Director, CNARC: The Evolution of the CNARC
  • Thorsteinn Gunnarsson, Senior Adviser, Icelandic Centre for Research: North meets East: Learning at the Crossroads
  • Yang Jian, Vice President, Shanghai Institutes for International Studies and Deputy Director, CNARC: Chinese perspectives on CNARC
  • Timo Koivurova, Director and Research Professor, Arctic Centre, University of Lapland: Finnish perspectives on CNARC
  • Jan-Gunnar Winther, Specialist / Director, Norwegian Polar Institute: Norwegian perspectives on CNARC
  • Egill Thor Nielsson, Executive Secretary, CNARC and Visiting Scholar, Polar Research Institute of China: CNARC perspectives on the evolution of the China-Nordic Arctic Cooperation

Chair:

Hallgrimur Jonasson, Director-General, Icelandic Centre for Research

The Ocean Cluster Network and the Arctic

Organized by: Iceland Ocean Cluster (5. September 2017)

The global expansion of the Iceland Ocean Cluster model has partly been fueled by the dialogue and relationship building created at the Arctic Circle meetings for the last few years. Various clusters, in or close to the Arctic Circle, are now being formed. These clusters mission are to crossover knowledge and strengthen coastal regions.

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Saturday, October 14, 11:20 - 12:20
Location: Sjávarklasinn, Grandagardur 16

Speakers:

  • Thor Sigfusson Ph.D., Founder, Chairman and Owner of Iceland Ocean Cluster and co-founder and strategic partner to New England, New Bedford and Seattle Ocean Clusters
  • Berta Daníelsdóttir CEO Iceland Ocean Cluster – Iceland: The six years of Ocean Cluster success
  • Patrick Arnold, Founder of New England Ocean Cluster - USA: Pawing the Way For the US Cluster Initiatives
  • Edward Washburn, Founder of New Bedford Ocean Cluster – USA: Establishing the New Bedford Ocean Cluster
  • Ragnheiður Elín Árnadóttir, Founder of Seattle Ocean Cluster - Iceland: Building Stronger Relations Between US and Iceland with the Seattle Ocean Cluster
  • Karen Gillis, Alaska Ocean Cluster – Alaska: Alaska Ocean Cluster
  • Ronny Isaksen, CEO Linken Business Garden Båtsfjord – Norway: Establishing Ocean Cluster in Northern Norway

Polar Law: Alaska

Organized by University of Akureyri (7. September 2017)

The session explores three pressing legal issues in Alaska. First of all, Professor Norchi assesses whether and how the United States can secure sovereign rights to the resources of the Outer Continental Shelf beyond 200 nautical miles whilst remaining outside of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea. 

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Saturday, October 14, 16:00 - 17:30
Location: Viðey, Second Level

Dr Schane explains and evaluates Alaskan measures to ensure that indigenous communities benefit from the development of local fisheries and asks what lessons can be learned from other industries in the Arctic. Miss Mackie examines the interplay between climate change, projections for ice-loss and the designation of species as ‘threatened’ under the Endangered Species Act.

Speakers:

  • Charles Norchi, Professor of Law, Director, Center for Oceans and Coastal Law, University of Maine School of Law & Fulbright-Ministry for Foreign Affairs Arctic Scholar: The Extended Continental Shelf of the American Arctic: Lex Imperfecta?
  • Demian Schane, Attorney-Advisor, National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Office of General Counsel: Involving Alaska Native communities in the Development of Commercial Fisheries: A Review of Community Development Quota Program and Its Potential for Broader Application
  • Sarah Mackie, PhD Candidate, Newcastle Law School; Visiting Researcher, Harvard Law School: When the Ice Melts - Using Climate Change Predictions in Endangered Species Designations in Arctic Alaska

Chair:

Claire Wallace, M.A. Polar law candidate, University of Akureyri

Polar law: Indigenous governance

Organized by: University of Akureyri (7. September 2017)

This session presents four perspectives on indigenous governance in the Arctic and promotes indigenous self-determination. Dr Wilson presents the key international instruments that aim to ensure meaningful indigenous involvement in Arctic extractive industries.

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Friday, October 13, 17:55 - 19:25
Location: Skarðsheiði, Third Level

Professor Ravna explains Norways’ measures to implement ILO Convention 169 through legislation and case-law. Dr Joona examines the provision of culturally and linguistically appropriate education to Sámi children living outside of traditional Sámi homeland in Finland. Finally, Ms Sheldon discusses the challenges of creating an indigenous justice system for Yukon First Nations.

Speakers:

  • Emma Wilson, Director, ECW Energy Ltd.; Associate, Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge: Indigenous Rights and Extractive Industries in the Arctic: Evaluation of International Ethical Standards and Guidelines
  • Øyvind Ravna, Professor of Law, University of Tromsø: the Arctic University of Norway: How Norway Meets its Commitments to the Sámi under International Law: assessed by the most recent case law.
  • Tanya Joona, Senior Researcher, Arctic Centre, University of Lapland: The Right to Education and Culture of Indigenous Sámi Children and Youth in Finland – Challenges of Urbanization.
  • Melaina Sheldon, B.A., Jane Glassco Northern Fellowship Alumna, Gordon Foundation (Canada): We don’t want a brown version of the YTG, in Nän K'ałädàtth'ät (Changing times, continuing ways)

Chair:

Apostolos Tsiouvalas, LL.M. Polar law candidate, University of Akureyri

Maine Business and The Arctic - Building Relationships

Organized by the Maine Department of Transportation (8. October 2017)

Friday, October 13, 13:00 - 14:00 
Location: Björtuloft, Fifth Level

Speakers:

  • David Bernhardt, Commissioner, Maine Department of Transportation: Building Relationships in the Transportation Sector: Building Relationships in the Transportation Sector
  • Larus Isfeld, Managing Director & Executive Vice President, Eimskip USA: Building Relationships: Eimskip and Maine
  • Peter Handy, President & CEO, Bristol Seafood: Building Relationships in the Fisheries Sector
  • Mark Hopkins, Business Development, Hancock Lumber: Maine Building Materials in The Arctic Patrick Arnold, Co-Founder & CEO, New England Ocean Cluster: Building Relationships: Iceland and Maine

Chair:

Dana Eidsness, Director, Maine North Atlantic Development Office (MENADO), Maine International Trade Center: Developing Trade Relationships in the North Atlantic

Research infrastructure in Greenland – status and visions

Organized by the University of Copenhagen, Aarhus University and Danish Technical University in cooperation with the Danish Ministry of Higher Education and Science. (11. September 2017)

A few short presentation about existing Greenland, Danish and foreign research infrastructure in Greenland will be the basis for a panel discussion concerning the need for new future research infrastructure in Greenland. Selected Greenland, Danish and international scientists with need for research infrastructure in Greenland will be invited to participate in the panel.

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Friday, October 13, 17:55 - 19:25
Location: Viðey, Second Level

 

The panel discussion will address:

  • the possibilities of using a planned Danish/Greenland research hub in Greenland to coordinate infrastructure and logistics across science disciplines, universities and countries.
  • the currently increasing interest among foreign polar research institutions on establishing research infrastructure in Greenland.
  • the increasing need for improved overview of research projects and similar activities in and around Greenland.

The outcome of the discussions will be provided as a report to the Danish Ministry of Higher Education and Science and the Greenland Ministry of Education, Culture, Research and Church and will further be reported at the annual meeting in Forum of Arctic Research Operators at Arctic Science Summit Week 2018 in Davos, Switzerland, June 2018.
The breakout session is coordinated with the Danish Ministry of Higher Education and Science and should be seen as a breakout session relating to the plenum session by the Danish Realm with the title: ‘New Opportunities. Arctic Science from research to practice’.

Speakers:

  • “Existing Greenlandic/Danish research infrastructure in Greenland”
    • Morten Rasch, University of Copenhagen
    • Peter Schmidt Mikkelsen, Aarhus University
  • Jennifer Mercer, US-NSF: U.S. Infrastructure for Scientific Research in Greenland
  • Konrad Steffen, Swiss Polar Institute: Swiss Camp Climatology, 1990 – 2017
  • Yong Yu, Polar Research Institute of China: China’s plans concerning establishment of a research station in Greenland
  • Nicole Biebow, Alfred Wegener Institute (EU-PolarNet): EU-PolarNet – Recommendations for European research
  • Margareta Johansson, Lund University (INTERACT): Pan-arctic cooperation between research infrastructures – INTERACT
  • Søren Rysgaard, Aarhus University: A short history of marine research 1994 to 2017 in Greenland
  • Bo Elberling, University of Copenhagen: Future needs for research infrastructure in the ice-free part of Greenland
  • Frej Sorento Dichmann, Ministry of Higher Education and Science: Potential for an international research hub in Greenland
  • Sten Lund, Greenland Government: Greenland Research Strategy, International Research HUB in Greenland

Chair:

Morten Pejrup, University of Copenhagen.

Regional cross-boarder cooperation in the Arctic in a challenging geopolitical context

Organized by Troms County Council, Norway (14. September 2017)

All the Arctic states, including Russia, have seemingly buffered circumpolar cooperation from broader geopolitical tensions. The Arctic becomes the glue that keeps the world together, the place where the dialogue continues.

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Saturday, October 14, 16:00 - 17:30
Location: Akrafjall, Fourth Level

The most often raised question now is whether the Arctic dialogue, the Arctic partnership, is robust enough to withstand the conflicts that play out in other parts of the world.
In this session, we want to have a closer look at the dynamics of cross-border relations in the Arctic on the national and regional levels, focusing mostly on the relations between Norway and Russia. We want to share our experience on how regional cross-border cooperation not only addresses the goals set for regional development but also provides important arenas for the dialogue between the Arctic states.

Panelists

  • Knut-Eirik Dybdal, CEO, Arctic Race of Norway
  • Kristin Røymo, The mayor of the City of Tromsø,
  • Maria Utsi, director of Arctic Arts Festival and co-founder of Arctic Arts Summit
  • Marina Krasilnikova, Living Standards research director, Analytical Center of Yuri Levada (Levada-Center, Moscow, Russia)
  • Willy Ørnebakk, chair of the Troms County Government.
  • Kjell Dragnes, former Foreign Editor of Aftenposten, Norway
  • Anne Husebekk, Rector UiT, Tromsø University
  • Hilde Sandvik, board member of Amedia

Angry Inuk - Film Screening and Q&A with Director Alethea Arnaquq-Baril

Organized by the Polar Research and Policy Initiative (14. September 2017)

Angry Inuk is a 2016 Canadian feature-length documentary film written and directed by Alethea Arnaquq-Baril that defends the Inuit seal hunt, arguing the hunt is a vital means for Inuit peoples to sustain themselves. 

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Friday, October 13, 21:00 - 22:00
Location: Kaldalón, Ground Level

Subjects in Angry Inuk include Arnaquq-Baril herself as well as Aaju Peter, an Inuit seal hunt advocate, lawyer and seal fur clothing designer who depends on the sealskins for her livelihood. Partially shot in the filmmaker's home community of Kimmirut, where seal hunting is seen as essential for survival, the film follows Peter and other Inuit to Europe in an effort to have the EU Ban on Seal Products overturned.

  1. Introduction of the movie and of the movie director: Dr. Dwayne Ryan Menezes
  2. Screening of the film Angry Inuk
  3. Q&A with Alethea Arnaquq-Baril

Speakers:

  • Dwayne Ryan Menezes, Director, Polar Research and Policy Initiative
  • Anne-Tamara Lorre PhD, Ambassador of Canada to Iceland
  • Carolyn Bennett PC MP, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs, Canada
  • Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, Angry Inuk
  • Penny Goodman FRGS, British academic and Hon Secretary of the Arctic Club

The best PhD students of Québec and the Nordics: Lightning talks from the The Mon projet nordique / My Northern Project competition

Organized by the Institut nordique du Québec (INQ), the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Nature et technologies (FRQNT) and NordForsk (7. September 2017)

Arctic Circle delegates are invited to the final of the Mon projet nordique competition, which brings together twelve PhD students from Québec (Canada) and the Nordic countries. These remarkable research students are ready to present their research projects, each of which targets a critical issue currently facing northern environments, to which their research work should provide innovative potential solutions.

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Saturday, October 14, 16:00 - 17:30
Location: Björtuloft, Fifth Level 

The Mon projet nordique competition, funded by the INQ, the FRQNT and Nordforsk, took place on two continents over the past six months and brought together a total of sixty participants.
Come listen to the students’ five-minute presentations and vote for a “Public’s Choice” winner from each continent!

Speakers:

  • Charles Brunette, PhD student in atmospheric and ocean sciences, McGill University: Regional and seasonal forecasts of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean
  • Julie Ducrocq, PhD student in epidemiology, Université Laval: Subsistence activities, infectious diseases and global change in Nunavik: improving prevention and promoting Inuit traditions through documentation
  • François Lapointe, PhD student in Earth sciences, INRS-ETE: Investigating modes of climate variability in the Arctic through annual sediment layers
  • Gwyneth Anne MacMillan, PhD student in biological sciences, Université de Montréal: Not that rare after all! Rare earth elements in Arctic terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems
  • Mélissande Nagati, PhD student in environmental science, UQAT, and in biodiversity, ecology and evolution, Université Paul Sabatier (Toulouse, France): Effect of vegetation cover and microorganisms on the establishment of fir seedlings in boreal forest
  • Barbara Vuillaume, PhD student in biology, Université Laval: Using camera collars to study calf survival among migratory caribou
  • Jaakko Pietarinen, PhD student, Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Helsinki: What characterises a good reindeer mother
  • Jasmiini Pylkkänen, PhD student, Department for Cultural Anthropology, University of Oulu, Finland
  • Sandra Fischer, PhD student, Department for Physical Geography, Stockholm University, Sweden
  • Mariia Nesterenko, PhD student, Department of Sociology, Archangelsk University: Human health in the Arctic as social value
  • Majken Paulsen, PhD student, Faculty of Social Sciences, Nord University: Human-nature interactions in the Arctic; ecological alterations, emerging infectious diseases and impacts on human and non-human well-being
  • Barbara Baczynska, PhD student, in Sociology, Nord University: Cultural foundation of adaptation to climate change impacts, especially climate sensitive infections, among pastoral communities in northern Norway

Arctic Science & Business / Industry Cooperation

Organized by the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC) (13. September 2017)

As access to Arctic regions increases, we have seen a concurrent increase in interest of small businesses and large industry in potential opportunities to explore resource extraction, cold region technology, and infrastructure development. Scientific studies are often essential precursors to reduce risk associated with investments on the frontiers of new opportunities. Arctic science can facilitate business, but business can also facilitate science, whether through financing, data, or collaboration.


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Sunday, October 15, 12:45 - 13:45

This session will bring together industry representatives, financiers, and researchers to explore new opportunities for development in and understanding of the northern high latitudes, and how these opportunities are enabled by and/or contribute to Arctic research. Panelists will highlight examples of how Arctic science has facilitated industry and how Arctic business has enabled Arctic science. The idea is to showcase case studies and best practices to model behaviors and lessons learned to lay the ground for future cooperation.

Speakers:

  • Kelly Drew, Professor, University of Alaska Fairbanks: Translating mechanisms of hibernation in Arctic species for rural and remote emergency medicine shows how Arctic research can impact world health.
  • Sara Longan, Executive Director, North Slope Science Initiative (NSSI), US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management: Perspectives on integrating science into Arctic development planning and approvals
  • Tara Sweeney, Arctic Economic Council Vice-Chair, Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) Executive Vice President of External Affairs for Arctic Slope Regional Corporation: Perspectives from industry in the Arctic and the broader voice of the AEC, which facilitates Arctic business-to-business activities and responsible economic development through the sharing of best practices, technological solutions, standards, and other information
  • Andrea Tilche, Head, Climate Action and Earth Observation Unit, European Commission: The Business Case for Arctic Observations
  • Toril I. Røe Utvik, Manager Arctic Unit, Statoil: Academia-industry cooperation in Norwegian Arctic research

Chair:

  • Larry Hinzman, Vice-President, International Arctic Science Committee, Chair, IASC Action Group of Arctic Science & Business/Industry Cooperation, Vice Chancellor for Research, the University of Alaska Fairbanks

The Future of Arctic Fisheries

Organized by the Korea Maritime Institute (KMI), Fridtjof Nansen Institute (FNI) and the Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI) (11. September 2017)

As ice rescinds in the Arctic due to climate change, opportunities for fisheries in Arctic waters might expand. This session brings together potential stakeholders in future Arctic fisheries from Northern Europe and Northeast Asia, to examine the applicability of current international norms and regulations on fisheries to the Arctic region, proper management directions, and possible areas of cooperation. 

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Friday, October 13, 17:55 - 19:25
Location: Flói, Ground Level

Speakers:

  • Olav Schram Stokke, University of Oslo and Fridtjof Nansen Institute: Norway’s Institutional means for managing high-seas fisheries in the Arctic
  • Birkir Bárðarson, Marine biologist, Marine and Freshwater Research Institute, Reykjavik: Capelin and other pealgic fish stocks under changing environmental conditions - Icelandic perspective
  • Hyoung Chul Shin, Director, Division of Strategy and Cooperation, Korea Polar Research Institute and Young-Kil Park, Head, Polar Policy Research Center, Korea Maritime Institute: The Central Arctic Ocean Challenge: Scientific Opportunities and Governance Connections

Chairs: 

  • Jong-Deog Kim, Director General of Industry Intelligence and Strategy Research Division, Korea Maritime Institute
  • Geir Hønneland, Director, Fridtjof Nansen Institute

Planning Our Low Carbon Future - Shared Experiences of National and City Spatial Planning

Organized by the Scottish Government (13. September 2017)

As we move to a future where significant transformational change is required in response to climate change, spatial planning will need to show strong leadership and make sustainable decisions on land use and infrastructure. How can we make best use of our natural energy resources? What infrastructure will we need? What is the role of city planning in increasing development density and facilitating low carbon transport on a much greater scale?

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Friday, October 13, 17:55 - 19:25

Location: Kaldalón, Ground Level

This session will allow us to share our expectations of how climate change challenges and opportunities could influence long term planning at a regional, city and neighborhood scale. We will compare current approaches in Scotland and Iceland and share our ideas on building greater resilience into our plans for the future. The session will show that ambitious and innovative spatial planning can ensure we adapt to future climate change whilst also delivering better outcomes for people and places


Speakers:

  • Fiona Simpson, Assistant Chief Planner, Scottish Government: Scotland’s National Planning Framework and Climate Change Plan – guiding transformational change
  • Cathy Johnston, Group Manager, Development and Regeneration Services, Glasgow City Council: City planning for climate change – Glasgow
  • Ásdís Hlökk Theodórsdóttir, Director, National Planning Agency, Iceland: Planning for resilience at the national level
  • Björn Axelsson, Director of Planning, the City of Reykjavík Council: Sustainable neighbourhood plans from a local perspective
  • Ólöf Örvarsdóttir, Head of Department of Environment and Planning, City of Reykjavik Council: Sustainable future

Discussion: What are the common challenges? What needs to change? How can we share innovation?

 

Chair:

  • John McNairney, Chief Planner, Scottish Government

‘Our Arctic’: Achievements, Opportunities, and Challenges in the Canadian North

Organized by: University of Toronto (5. September 2017)

Beginning in the 1970s, Northern Canadian communities have entered into negotiations with the federal government to resolve their land claims. Since that time, many of those land claims have been settled and Canada’s northern communities – many of which are indigenous – have made great strides in achieving self-governance. 

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Those who live in Canada’s north strive to define and govern their regions within the political and economic challenges of Canadian Confederation. Beyond Canada, at the Arctic regional level, and into the sphere of the global economy Canada’s northern territories, private sector, and aboriginal corporations have become regional and global actors and are increasingly finding and continuing to seek a greater voice and political influence in their own regions and on pan-arctic issues. The successes of Canada’s North, however, is dependent on overcoming the challenges at the local and national level to build the necessary critical infrastructure for the benefit of northerners and Canada. Many of the ongoing challenges will require cooperation across the Canadian North, as well with their national government and partners throughout the North American and Nordic Arctic states and those global partners with an active and invested interest in the Arctic. This session will showcase some of the achievements and opportunities for Canada’s North as well as present the region’s ongoing challenges.


Speakers:

  • The Honourable Bob McLeod, Premier of the Northwest Territories
  • Madeleine Redfern, Mayor of Iqaluit, Nunavut
  • Clint Davis, Chairman at NGC Nunatsiavut Inc.; Inuit Capital Strategy Trust; and Partner and Managing Director of Acasta Capital Indigenous
  • David Ramsay, former Minister of Industry, Tourism and Investment, Northwest Territories; CEO of Arctic Mineral Resources; and Director, Fortune Minerals

Chair:

  • Jessica Shadian, Distinguished Senior Fellow, Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, U. of Toronto

Scales of observations – connecting Arctic data, information and people

Organized by Group on Earth Observations (GEO), Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks (SAON), European Polar Board (EPB), World Meteorological Organisation (WMO), and the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) (11. September 2017)

Building on the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Plenary session at 2016 Arctic Circle Assembly, this session will continue highlighting the importance of Arctic observations for decision making in the Arctic and worldwide.

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Saturday, October 14, 17:30 - 19:00
Location: Skarðsheiði, Third Level

The session will emphasise the importance of sustained Arctic observations across both temporal and geographic scales to maximise their societal benefits and usefulness in advising decision-making. Flash or lightening presentations will start the session to introduce participants to the range of Earth observation projects, networks and organisations with a focus on the Arctic. A panel discussion will follow and focus on interoperability of observations, allowing for increased use and accessibility across temporal and geographic scales, including remote sensing and satellite observations, in situ (ground-based observations) and monitoring, Indigenous-Knowledge-driven monitoring, and community-based observing initiatives throughout the Arctic. The panel will be followed by discussion (Q&A) with the audience. The session and the panel will be moderated by chairs, who also provide short introductions and summaries of the session.

Introduction

  • Barbara Ryan, Secretariat Director, Group on Earth Observations

Speaker: 

  • Árni Snorrason, Director, Icelandic Meteorological Office: Large-scale Arctic climate observations –WMO
  • Hannele Savela, Research Coordinator, Thule Institute, University of Oulu: Arctic terrestrial in situ observations and monitoring –an example from the INTERACT network
  • Jan René Larsen, SAON Secretary, Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme: International coordination of Arctic monitoring
  • Renuka Badhe, Executive Secretary, European Polar Board
  • Stein Sandven, Research Director, Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center
  • Yubao Qiu, Associate Professor, Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences: Integrating Scales of Observations – an Example from High Mountain Asia
  • Anders Oskal, Director, International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry
  • Ola Gråbak, Applications Engineer, ESA Earth Observation directorate
  • Maribeth Murray, Executive Director, Arctic Institute of North America: Community-based observing – outcomes of AOS
  • Peter Pulsifer – Research Scientist II, National Snow and Ice Data Center CIRES, University of Colorado: Data Interoperability in Arctic Earth Observations

Chair:

Peter Pulsifer, ADC/University of Colorado

EU Arctic Policy: Science as catalyst for international cooperation

Organized by EU-PolarNet, the European Polar Board and INTERACT (13. September 2017)

Challenges posed by climate change, globalization and geopolitical dynamics increasingly exceed local and national mitigation and adaptation capacities. A sustainable future for the Arctic thus requires regional and international actors to jointly recognize issues and develop solutions to address these together.

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Saturday, October 14, 17:30 - 19:00
Location: Háaloft, Eighth Level

Recognising this, the European Commission and the High Representative have defined International Cooperation on Arctic Issues as a priority area in the integrated European Union policy for the Arctic. Herein they assign a key role to science as a catalyst to support a common understanding, jointly agreed solutions and peaceful cooperation. Transnational access to research infrastructures, open data resources, as well as international networks and bilateral agreements are seen as important steps towards an improved scientific cooperation and enhanced political and economic links with key countries in the region.
This breakout session aims at fostering active discussions on how to further improve international cooperation in Arctic science.

Speakers:

  • Karmenu Vella, Commissioner for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, European Commission: (opening address via video message)
  • Margareta Johansson, Coordinator INTERACT: Sustained transnational access to Arctic Terrestrial Infrastructures.
  • Martin Jeffries, Assistant Director for Polar Sciences & Executive Director, U.S. Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee, White Office of Science and Technology Policy: Facilitating Arctic Science Cooperation via the Canada-EU-USA Atlantic Ocean Research Alliance.
  • Hyoung Chul Shin, Head of Department for International Cooperation, Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI): Arctic Research Cooperation; Role of Observer States and The Growing Contribution
  • Alexander Klepikov, Head of Department for Antarctic Ocean and Climate Studies, Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI, Russia): The Russian Perspective on Key Areas of International Cooperation in Arctic Research.
  • Verónica Willmott, Project Manager ARICE (Alfred Wegener Institute, Germany): ARICE: Arctic Research Icebreaker Consortium. An International Cooperation Strategy For Meeting the Needs For Marine-Based Research in the Arctic.

Chair:

Andrea Tilche, Head of Unit Climate Action and Earth Observation, Directorate General for Research and Innovation, European Commission

Voices of Youth: How to Build a Successful Arctic Youth Engagement Program

Organized by: Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) Arctic Council Working Group; United States Fish and Wildlife Service (7. September 2017)

Changes in the Arctic did not happen overnight, and some of the challenges the region (and the world) faces today, such as climate change, cannot be solved overnight.

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Friday, October 13, 16:25 - 17:55
Location: Stemma, Ground Level

Younger generations are playing an important role in addressing these challenges. Arctic youth programs exist in many forms and with many purposes, but all of these Arctic youth programs involve a group of knowledgeable youth from across the region who understand the Arctic and its people and can explain it from a youth perspective for their peers across the Arctic and others around the world.

Speakers

  • Tom Barry, CAFF Executive Secretary: Overview of CAFF education and youth engagement program
  • "Nomadic reindeer herders"
    • Alena Gerasimova, Association of World Reindeer Herders
    • Svein Mathiesen Association of World Reindeer Herders:
  • Jeehye Kim, Korean Arctic Academy: “South Korea’s Engagement with Future Generations for a Sustainable Arctic”
  • Gina Goh, Republic of Singapore, representing a number of Arctic youth programs in Singapore [still awaiting title of presentation]
  • Maka Monture, Youth Programs Fellow, U.S. Arctic Youth Ambassador Program

ARCTIC YOUTH AMBASSADORS:
Perspectives for Successful Youth involvement on Arctic Sustainability

  • Macy Kenworthy (US Arctic Youth Ambassador Program)
  • Cade Terada (US Arctic Youth Ambassador Program)
  • Alejandro Soto (US Arctic Youth Ambassador Program)
  • Alliana Salanguit (US Arctic Youth Ambassador Program)
  • Bobbie McNeley (Aleut International)

Chair:

Gilbert Castellanos, U.S. Head of Delegation to the CAFF Working Group, U.S. Department of the Interior

Arctic, Chinese tourism, and Stakeholders’ strategies

Organized by the Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, Rovaniemi (7. September 2017)

Chinese tourism is expected to resume its rapid growth in the near future, and also Arctic destinations, are affected by this trend, and will receive important flows of Chinese tourists (e.g. Finnish Lapland will double in 2017 the number of Chinese tourists of 2015).

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Saturday, October 14, 08:00 - 09:00
Location: Flói, Ground Level

Beside the known Chinese tourists travelling in group, hunting for photo, shopping opportunities and rush from one tourist highlight to the next, a new segment is rising: the individual tourist, having new requests and wishes and looking for more leisure activities in a pristine environment as the Arctic is perceived in their images and representations.
Is the tourism industry prepared to this new target?

This session aims at discussing, among others, the:

  • Chinese tourist experiences in the Arctic
  • Entrepreneurship and tourism in the Arctic
  • Stakeholders’ products and strategies for the Chinese market
  • Local communities’ involvement and expectations about tourism
  • Potentials and pitfalls of Arctic tourism

Speakers:

  • Daniela Tommasini, Senior Researcher at the Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland: Tourism in peripheral Arctic Communities: Potentials and Entrepreneurship, Hindrances and Pitfalls.
  • Shenghan Zhou, Doctoral Candidate at Multidimensional Tourism Institute, University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland: Chinese Tourists in the Arctic, Wishes and Experiences.

Chair:

Daniela Tommasini, Senior Researcher at the Arctic Centre

Climate Change in the Arctic: Atmosphere, Sea Ice, Ecology and Remote Sensing

Organized by the College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University (13. September 2017)

Climate change in the arctic regions has attracted more and more young scientists and graduate students in China. 

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Friday, October 13, 17:55 - 19:25

Location: Hafnarkot, Ground Level

The pattern of recent surface warming observed in Arctic exhibits undergoing dramatic changes during the past few decades, with wide ranging impacts on natural and social systems. From four aspects, including atmosphere, sea ice, ecology and remote sensing, this session aims at presenting the views and initiating ideas by young scientists from the Joint Center on Global Change Studies, Beijing Normal University.

Speakers:

  • Yating Chen, Master Candidate: Spatial Change of Carbon Storage in Circum-Arctic Permafrost Area under Geoengineering
  • Xinchen Lv, Master Candidate: Seasonal Patterns of Canopy Photosynthesis Captured by Remotely Sensed Fluorescence and Vegetation Indexes at Mid-to-high Latitude Forests
  • Yifan Ding, PhD Candidate: Derivation of Melt Ponds on Arctic Sea Ice using MODIS Surface Reflectance Data
  • Yuanyuan Zhang, PhD Candidate: The Potential Role of Sea Ice Leads in the Seasonal Arctic Sea Ice Extent Prediction
  • Zhuoqi Chen, Associate Professor: The Latest Image Mosaic of Greenland Based on Landsat 8
  • Chuanfeng Zhao, Professor: Association Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Pollution

Chairs:

  • Xiao Cheng, Professor, College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University
  • Chuanfeng Zhao, Professor, College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University

limate service innovation & enhancing climate resilience in Arctic businesses

Organized by: Climate-KIC Aps (11. September 2017)

Climate services are seen as a key to closing the gap between research institutions and business. In the Arctic, climate services represent a unique opportunity to create tangible benefit from work being conducted at the forefront of climate science; to enhance the climate resilience of Arctic industries whilst providing businesses with opportunities to achieve blue-green growth. Climate-service development however, is in its relative infancy and development pathways are poorly established.

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Sunday, October 15, 08:00 - 09:00

This session will evaluate the long-term climate resilience strategies of Arctic businesses; discuss why and how such services are to be made available to all Arctic stakeholders; and explore how climate-resilient innovations can be accelerated to meet the growing demands of the Arctic economy.
How can the products of climate-service development be effectively incorporated into long-term business strategies? In this session, business actors, climate service developers, and policy makers will examine the future development of climate service and other climate-related technologies, and the infrastructure needed to foster innovation in this field.

Speakers: 

  • Mark Payne, Senior Researcher, Danish Technical University: Introduction to climate-services; the opportunities and the benefits
  • Anna Karlsdóttir, Senior Research Fellow, Nordregio: Climate services and their role in long-term business strategy
  • Mads Randbøll Wolff, Project Manager, Nordic Ministry Council for the Nordic Pavilion at COP23: Arctic SME’s and achieving climate resilience
  • Peter Vangsbo, Nordic Business Developer Climate-KIC: Facilitating greater innovation within climate services and climate-resilience, breaking down knowledge silos

Chair:

Solveig Zophoniasdottir, Climate KIC

Supporting Sustainable Northern Coastal Communities

Organized by Newfoundland and Labrador and Memorial University, UArctic, and Univeristy of Tromsø – the Arctic University of Norway (13. September 2017)

Coastal communities in the Arctic and across the North Atlantic Rim understand the impact of climate change deeply. There is a host of related impacts that pose fundamental challenges to the very fabric of life in these regions. Food, transportation, culture, sense of place, and social relationships: all are being affected.

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Saturday, October 14, 08:00 - 09:00
Location: Björtuloft, Fifth Level 

Resilience is a way of life in these regions (it always has been); however, the pace of change has quickened, making challenges harder to address. The evolving reality facing Northern coastal communities is increasingly complex and must be addressed with innovative, collaborative approaches that emphasize the knowledge, needs, perspectives, and goals of local people.
Presenters will share their experience undertaking university-community collaboration. From there, participants will work together to identify and discuss existing models for addressing key sustainability issues, and consider new ideas and concepts to help support community-directed and community-engaged research in the North.

Speakers: 

  • Rob Greenwood, Executive Director, Public Engagement and the Leslie Harris Centre of Regional Policy and Development, Memorial University, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada: Thriving Communities: The Sustainable Northern and Coastal Communities Initiative
  • Anne Husebekk, Rector, University of Tromsø, Arctic University of Norway, Tromso, Norway: Humans in the Arctic Matter!
  • Lars Kullerud, President, University of the Arctic, Arendal city, Norway
  • Sheila Downer, Strategic Northern Liaison, Public Engagement and Labrador Institute, Memorial University, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada: Thriving Communities: The Sustainable Northern and Coastal Communities Initiative

Chair:

  • Ashlee Cunsolo, Director, the Labrador Institute, Memorial University, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

 

Arctic Innovation Lab: 12 Ideas For a Better Arctic

Organized by the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, the Iceland School of Energy at Reykjavík University, University of Greenland, the Fletcher School at Tufts University and the University of Iceland. (22. September 2017)

Come hear twelve ideas for a better Arctic and vote for your favorite one. The Arctic Innovation Lab is organized in partnership with the Arctic Initiative at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government with participants from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, the Iceland School of Energy at Reykjavík University, the University of Greenland, and the University of Iceland.

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Friday, October 13, 16:15 - 17:45
Location: Norðurljós, Second Level

In this session twelve talents will present their ideas in short pitch form. Topics will cover a wide range of issues including empowering arctic communities, reducing pollution, and developing new models for marine conservation. After the pitches, audience members will have the chance to join a roundtable breakout discussion to discuss the idea of their choice, and will vote to choose the winning pitch. The goal of the Arctic Innovation Lab is to connect a new generation of leaders with experienced practitioners and encourage innovative solutions for the fast changing Arctic region.

Introductions: 

  • John Holdren, Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and former Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy
  • Halla Hrund Logadóttir, Fellow and Co-Founder, Arctic Initiative at the Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Presentations:

  • Gabrielle Scrimshaw, MPA Candidate, Harvard Kennedy School of Government: Indigenous Leadership for Arctic Tourism
  • Mauricio Latapi, PhD Candidate, University of Iceland: Does Iceland Dream of Electric Shipping?
  • Morgan Brown, MPA Candidate, Harvard Kennedy School of Government: Identity and Adaptation: Food Production and Climate Change
  • Vanessa DiDomenico, MALD Candidate, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University: Navigating Vessels Through Compliance
  • Evelyn Gunawan, MSc Candidate, Iceland School of Energy, Reykjavik University: Zero-Waste Arctic Communities
  • Charlotte McEwen, MPP Candidate, Harvard Kennedy School of Government: Using Drones to Support Remote Arctic Communities
  • Martina Muller, MPP Candidate, Harvard Kennedy School of Government: Protecting Marine Biodiversity through Subnational Action
  • Tukumminnguaq Nykjær Olsen, MA Candidate, University of Greenland: Innovation is About Inclusion: Lets Make the Arctic Inclusive
  • Anja Kathrin Ruess, MSc Candidate, Iceland School of Energy, Reykjavik University: Deliberative Decision Making in the Arctic
  • Meredith Davis Tavera, MPP Candidate, Harvard Kennedy School of Government: Knowing Your Value: Successfully Negotiating for the Interests of Arctic Communities
  • Ziad Reslan, MPP Candidate, Harvard Kennedy School of Government: Digital Jobs, Not Handouts!
  • Ryan Uljua, MALD Candidate, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University: An Arctic Investment 

Chair:

Cole Wheeler, MPP Candidate, Harvard Kennedy School of Government 

Sustainable development in remote communities: three models of community ownership

Organized by: Nordic Horizons (14. September 2017)

Community control has brought new resources and populations to remote parts of the Scottish Highlands and Islands – places the private market didn’t always reach.


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Sunday, October 15, 12:45 - 13:45

Eigg is the first island in Scottish history to be bought back from a private absentee owner. Applecross now has a hydro electric system – Apple Juice – owned by the community. And the world’s first community owned distillery is about to start production in Dingwall.

How have these buyouts tackled problems of depopulation, high energy prices and unemployment? Join us to find out how these local economies are being stimulated through innovative models of community investment and ownership.

“Scotland and the New North” is the focus of the Arctic Forum to be hosted in Scotland in November 2017. Sustainable economic development in remote communities will be a major theme to be explored during the forum.

Speakers:

  • Maggie Fyffe MBE, Secretary of the Isle of Eigg Heritage Trust: Eigg – the community owned island. Eiggtricity
  • John Fraser Mckenzie, a helicopter pilot, farmer and green energy advocate: GlenWyvis – the community owned distillery, The Community Spiri
  • Alison Macleod, Development Officer for Applecross Community Company: From petrol to Apple Juice

Chair:

  • Lesley Riddoch, Director of Nordic Horizons

Student and staff mobility as an instrument for developing human capital in the North

Organized by University of the Arctic (13. September 2017)

Creating networks for coordinated and cooperative problem-solving is vitally important for further sustainable development of the Arctic. Student and staff mobility between the institutions of higher education constitutes an important opportunity for dissemination and exchange of knowledge, ideas, experience and skills. 

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Saturday, October 14, 08:00 - 09:00
Location: Akrafjall, Fourth Level

Mobility is a targeted, efficient, and cheap way to secure quality, mutual learning and respect in the circumpolar North. The University of the Arctic, which unites all Northern Higher Education Institutions, has mobility as one of its priorities. There are many institutions and stakeholders that would see mobility as a relevant instrument for achieving their goals. Some of them have Arctic specific ambitions; in other cases the North is a side element of their focus. In the session UArctic invites key actors to discuss how we, through collaborative action, could seek to further develop student, faculty, as well as business to business mobility for the good of developing the region.

Speakers:

  • Pål Markusson, Vice-President Mobility, University of the Arctic: The role of Uarctic in circumpolar student and staff mobility
  • Eirik Sivertsen, Chair, Delegation For Arctic Parliamentary Cooperation, Norwegian Parliament “Stortinget”: Student and staff mobility in the North: a Norwegian perspective
  • Erling Kvadsheim, Vice chair, Arctic Economic Council, Director for international affairs, The Norwegian Oil and Gas Assoc: The North needs northern business leaders
  • Ditte Nissen Lund, Ministry of Education in Denmark: How institutions in the Kingdom of Denmark utilizes the UArctic North2North mobility programme
  • Katri Kulmuni, Chair of the Finnish Arctic Parliamentarians group: Finnish chairmanship of the Arctic Council – visions for student and staff mobility

Chair:

  • Pål Markusson, Vice-President Mobility, University of the Arctic

A world without ice – Geopolitical imagination or a vision for the future?

Organized by Northern Research Forum (NRF) and University of Akureyri (11. September 2017)

Focus will be on visions of a world without ice. A geopolitical imagination? Or an imminent reality? 

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Saturday, October 14, 16:00 - 17:30

Although already envisioned as a source of new economic opportunities can we imagine a world without ice? What will the environmental and social consequences of a disappearing ice be? What will the biggest challenges and opportunities be? What is the interrelationship between society and nature, in environmental and cultural contexts? How will communities be impacted? Is ice a material thing, or does it have intrinsic value? Is ‘Industrial civilization’ willing and able to commit to reducing emissions? Can we halt the process of a melting ice? Or is it too little, too late?

Speakers: 

  • Salla Kalliojärvi, University of Lapland: The United Nations Security Council and Climate Change: Preparing for an iceless future.

  • Violetta Gassiy, Kuban State University

  • Suzanne Dunn, University of Ottawa: Digital access in the north: Rights, risks, and opportunities for young people. (TBC)

Chair:

Guðrún Rósa Þórsteinsdóttir director of University of Akureyri Research Centre and the Northern Research Forum Secretariat.

Indigenous Spirituality – A Gift for Transformation Of The World (Arctic And Pacific Contributions)

Organized by World Council of Churches, and the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Iceland (5. October 2017)

Friday, October 13, 16:25 - 17:5
Location: Þjóðmenningarhúsið, Hverfisgata 15

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Panel:

  • Rev. Thore Johnson, former General Secretary of Sami Council in Norway
  • Pauliina Kainulainen, PhD., Eco Theologist, Finland
  • Frances Namoumou, The Coordinator Pacific Conference of Churches Stewardship Program/Member of the Gender and Climate Justice Movement in Fjii and the Region
  • Archpriest. Michael Oleksa, J. Alaska

Chair:

Rev. Henrik Grape, Coordinator of the WCC Working Group on Climate Change

Global Perspectives on Traditional Knowledge, Science and Climate Change

Organized by Conservation International (5. October 2017)

Friday, October 13, 16:25 - 17:55
Location: Björtuloft, Fifth Level 

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Speakers:

  • Beatrice Lempaira, Conservationist, Conservation International, Africa - Kenya Massai nomadic herding
  • Hindou Ibrahim, International Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change, Chad
  • Cristelle Pratt, Fiji
  • Prasert Trakansuphakon, Karen elder from Thailand, Conservationist, Conservation International: Asia - Rotational agriculture

Chair:

Kristen Walker, Vice-president, Conservation International Policy Center for Environment and Peace

The Blue and the Green Arctic - Challenges and Opportunities

Organized by FRAM – High North Research Centre for Climate and the Environment (The Fram Centre) (5. October 2017)

Friday, October 13, 16:25 - 17:55
Location: Skarðsheiði, Third Level

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Speaker

  • Øyvind Fylling-Jensen, CEO – Managing Director NOFIMA: Sustainably exploiting the arctic marine potential
  • Halfdán Helga Helgason, Project Coordinator, Seatrack, Norwegian Polar Institute: SEATRACK – Large Scale Seabird Tracking in the Northeast Atlantic
  • Ingibjörg Svala Jónsdóttir, professor University of Iceland, Háskólasetrið á Svalbarða (University Centre in Svalbard): Adaptive long-term research in the face of the climate change
  • Tore Henriksen, Professor, UIT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø: Regulating Arctic Shipping: Political, legal, technological and environmental Challenges
  • Jennifer Stien, Researcher at the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA): Reindeerherding, challenges and opportunities

Chair

  • Jo Jorem Aarseth, Research Coordinator at the Fram Centre

Arctic Security Roundtable

Organized by the Munich Security Conference (13. October 2017)

Friday, October 13, 17:55 - 19:25
Location: Björtuloft, 5th floor 

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Panel

  • Charles D. Michel, Admiral, Vice Commandant, United States Coast Guard, Washington, DC
  • Alison LeClaire, Director General and Senior Arctic Official, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Canada, Ottawa
  • Nils Wang, Admiral, Commandant, Royal Danish Defence College, Copenhagen
  • Rasmus Gjedssø Bertelsen, Professor, University of Tromsø, Tromsø

Chair:

Mike Sfraga, Director, Polar Initiative, Woodrow Wilson International Centre for Scholars, Washington, DC

Arctic Security Roundtable

Organized by the Munich Security Conference (13. October 2017)

Friday, October 13, 17:55 - 19:25
Location: Björtuloft, 5th floor 

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Panel

  • Charles D. Michel, Admiral, Vice Commandant, United States Coast Guard, Washington, DC
  • Alison LeClaire, Director General and Senior Arctic Official, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Canada, Ottawa
  • Nils Wang, Admiral, Commandant, Royal Danish Defence College, Copenhagen
  • Rasmus Gjedssø Bertelsen, Professor, University of Tromsø, Tromsø

Chair:

Mike Sfraga, Director, Polar Initiative, Woodrow Wilson International Centre for Scholars, Washington, DC

We are the Arctic

Organized by Tromsø Kommune (5. October 2017)

Friday, October 13, 17:55-19:25
Location: Akrafjall, Fourth Level

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Speakers:

  • Kristin Røymo, Mayor of Tromsø, Norway: Welcome and Introduction
  • Päivi Laajala Mayor of Oulu, Finland: Innovation the Arctic
  • Eirikur Björn Björgvinsson, Mayor of Akureyri, Iceland: Creating Sustainable Turisme in the Arctic
  • Kristin Røymo, Mayor of Tromsø, Norway: Research and Competence in the Arctic
  • Arild Olsen, Longyearbyen, Svalbard
  • Niklas Nordström, Deputy Mayor of Luleå, Sweden: New Business Areas
  • Asii Chemnitz Narup, Mayor, Nuuk Greenland
  • Madeleine Redfern, Mayor Iqaluit, Canada*

Equitable Arctic Development of Natural Resources

Organized by the Arctic Oil and Gas Research Centre, Ilisimatusarfik (University of Greenland) (5. October 2017)

Friday, October 13, 21:00 - 22:00
Location: Esja, Fifth Level

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Speakers

  • Indra Overland, Head of the Energy Program, Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI): Ranking Oil, Gas and Mining Companies on Indigenous Rights in the Arctic
  • "Perspectives on Greenlandic Extractive Industries" 
    • Anne Merrild Hansen, Professor of Social Science, Arctic Oil and Gas Studies and Director of the Arctic Oil and Gas Research Centre, Ilisimatusarfik and
    • Rachael Lorna Johnstone, Professor of Law, Arctic Oil and Gas Studies and Director of the Arctic Oil and Gas Research Centre, Ilisimatusarfik
  • Eduardo Periera, Professor of Natural Resources and Energy Law, Externado U, Colombia: Joint Operating Agreement: Risk Control for the Non‐Operators within Arctic Operations

Chair

  • Anita L. Parlow, Esq., MSt. Fulbright-MFA Arctic Scholar at the University of Akureyri and National Energy Authority, Advisor, Harvard-MIT Arctic Fisheries

Fulbright in the Arctic – Meet the Scientists Invitation to engage with Fulbright Arctic Research Scientists and provide input into their work

Organized by: Fulbright Commission Iceland in cooperation with the US State Department‘s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and the National Science Foundation. (5. September 2017)

Fulbright scholars and fellows, who are commencing Arctic research projects in Iceland, will provide a brief overview of their projects, before the meeting breaks up into roundtables to discuss each project.

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Saturday, October 14, 16:00 - 17:30
Location: Háaloft, Eighth Level

The panelist will give some additional information at the start of the group work and then invite comments, questions and advice from the participants. This will give the researchers an opportunity to discuss their project with interested members of the public and give conference participants an opportunity to engage with the scientists and bring up issues, concerns, questions and comments in the early stages of the research project, including insights from other Arctic countries, different disciplines and approaches. The session will help the scientists to achieve a broader perspective on their research, make useful contacts and gain new insights. Each group will briefly report back on their discussions. Finally, participants will be given information on future Fulbright Arctic opportunities.

Roundtable Discussions

  • Bradley Barr, University of New Hampshire, Affiliate Professor, Fulbright-NSF Arctic Research Scholar at the Stefánsson Arctic Institute: Preserving Whaling Heritage in Iceland
  • John Bodinger, Chair, Department of Sociology & Anthropology, Susquehanna University, Fulbright-NSF Arctic research scholar at the University of Iceland: Museums and Sovereignties: Displaying "the National" as Public Identity Narrative
  • Jay Nelson, Professor of Biological Sciences, Towson University, Fulbright-NSF Arctic research scholar at Hólar University College: How Will Arctic Fish Deal with Future Climatic Alterations of Temperature and Flow?
  • Charles Norchi, Professor of Law, Chair of Graduate Law Programs at the University of Maine, Fulbright-Ministry for Foreign Affairs Arctic Scholar at the Universities of Iceland and Akureyri: The Constitutive Process of the Arctic - How Law is Made and Applied
  • Virginia Vitzthum, Professor of Anthropology, Indiana University, Fulbright-NSF Arctic Research Scholar at the University of Iceland: Effects of Seasonal Variation in Photoperiod on the Behaviours and Physiology of Icelandic Women
  • Christina Anaya, PhD student in biology at Oklahoma State University, Fulbright-NSF Arctic Research Fellow, Hólar University College: Freshwater and Marine Snails as Parasite Biodiversity Indicators in Iceland
  • David Prieto, independent research, Columbia University, Fulbright-NSF Arctic Research fellow at the Stefánsson Arctic Institute: Investigating the Benefits of a Marine Protected Area Over the Central Arctic Ocean

Additional Speakers:

  • Mike Sfraga, Co-Lead Scholar, Fulbright Arctic Initiative, Belinda Theriault, Executive Director, Fulbright Commission Iceland
  • Michael Hawes, Chief Executive Officer, Fulbright Canada: An Overview of Fulbright Opportunities in the Arctic.

Chair:

Belinda Theriault, Executive Director, Fulbright Commission Iceland

Global dynamics and actors affecting the Arctic - ecological, technological, economic,

Organized by the GlobalArctic Project, and TN on Geopolitics and Security (13. September 2017)

Globalization influences the Arctic, and the region has become part and parcel of systemic global economic, political, technological, cultural and environmental change. 

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Friday, October 13, 17:45 - 19:15
Location: Silfurberg A, Second Level

Numerous important types of international actors are shaping the new dynamics in the Arctic such as Arctic and Arctic Council observer states, Indigenous peoples’ organizations, intergovernmental organizations, transnational corporations and state-owned enterprises, and global and regional INGOs and networks (e.g. on the environment, science and education). All these actors and their interests – be it in competition or in collaboration – are determining the current and future governance of the Arctic. The presentations of this breakout session will focus on interests and activities by these actors, as well as consequences of their activities in the Arctic region.

Speakers:

  • Matthias Finger, Professor, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale Lausanne (EPFL): Resources Curse in the Arctic?
  • Hanna Katriina Lappalainen, Secretary General, Pan-Eurasian Experiment (PEEX), University of Helsinki & Finnish Meteorological Institute: System Understanding of the Arctic-boreal Regions for Constructing Scenarios and Assessments of the Future Development of the Northern Eurasian Environments and Societies
  • Natalia Kukarenko, Associate professor, Northern (Arctic) Federal University, Arkhangelsk: Ecological Security and Local Politicians’ Role in Informing Arctic Communities on Pollution: the Case of the Arkhangelsk Region
  • Jussi Huotari, PhD Candidate, Aleksanteri Institute, University of Helsinki: The Nexus of Energy, Environment and Economic Security in Offshore Oil and Gas Exploration Projects in the Barents Sea
  • Nikita Lomagin, Professor, European University in St. Petersburg: Russia's Oil and Gas Companies' Plans in the Arctic and Environmental Security

Moderator:

  • Lassi Heininen, Professor, University of Lapland

People, Planet and Profit: Promoting Sustainable Student Entrepreneurship in the Arctic

Organized by: Ilisimatusarfik - University of Greenland, Fróðskaparsetur Føroya - University of the Faroe Islands, The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (14. September 2017)

How can we empower students to be entrepreneurial driving forces in facilitating an integrated economic, social and environmentally sustainable development in the region? How can we promote sustainable student entrepreneurship through education, learning networks and capacity building at institutions of higher education in the Arctic? These are some of the key questions that will be discussed at this workshop format breakout session.

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Friday, October 13, 17:55 - 19:25
Location: Flói, Ground Level

The workshop is the official kick-off for the project “Promoting Sustainable Student Entrepreneurship in the Arctic”, which has been supported by the Nordic Council of Ministers. Based on the tenet that an essential driver for a sustainable development of the Arctic region is to promote sustainable entrepreneurship among students - the future generations of entrepreneurs - the project aims to build a Nordic collaboration on education, learning networks and capacity building within student entrepreneurship at HE institutions in the Arctic.

Speakers:

  • Sune Nordentoft Lauritsen, Head of Secretariat, Polar DTU, Technical University of Denmark: People, planet and profit in the Arctic - Promoting Sustainable Student Entrepreneurship in the Arctic region
  • Pål Fernvall, Senior Entrepreneurship Officer, DTU Skylab, Technical University of Denmark: Fostering entrepreneurial mindsets among students – how entrepreneurial competences can be cultivated among students and faculty
  • Anne Lise Kappel, Head of Department, Ilisimatusarfik: Student entrepreneurship in Greenland and the people bottom line
  • Lau Øfjord Blaxekjær, Assistant Professor, Programme Director of West Nordic Studies, Fróðskaparsetur Føroya (University of the Faroe Islands): Student entrepreneurship in the Faroe Islands and the planet bottom line
  • Kristoffer Buch, Innovation Manager, DTU Skylab, Technical University of Denmark: Arctic EntrepreneurShip – An ambitious entrepreneurial voyage along the west coast of Greenland

Results from a new climate change impact assessment for Iceland

Organized by: Icelandic Meteorological Office, University of Iceland, Agricultural University of Iceland, Marine and Freshwater Research Insitute, Icelandic Institute of Natural History (11. September 2017)

In 2017 the Science Committee on Climate Change finished a climate impact assessment for Iceland (CCIAI). In this session the main results of the assessment will be presented. Topics include the climate history of Iceland and recent observed and projected changes. Impacts of these changes in on both flora and fauna on land, as well as changes in marine life and oceanic conditions, including acidification. Furthermore, societal impacts will also be discussed.

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Sunday, October 15, 12:45 - 13:45

Speakers: 

  • Halldór Björnsson: Climate change in Iceland
  • Jón Ólafsson: Rapid ocean acidification in Icelandic waters
  • Ólafur S. Ástþórsson: Changes in Marine ecosystems around Iceland
  • Trausti Baldursson: Changes terrestrial flora and fauna
  • Brynhildur Davíðsdóttir: Societal impacts of climate change in Iceland.

Responsible Tourism in the Arctic

Organized by: Festa - Icelandic Center for CSR and the Iceland Tourism Cluster (5. September 2017)

In January 2017 Festa - Icelandic Center for Corporate Social Responsibility and the Iceland Tourism Cluster, in cooperation with the tourism industry in Iceland, launched an initiative to encourage responsible operational practices in tourism. 

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Friday, October 13, 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Viðey, Second Level

More than 300 tourism companies signed a pledge for responsible tourism. The vision of the project is for Iceland to be a leading nation for sustainable and responsible tourism. The initiative involves a dialogue among stakeholders, training sessions as well as development of know-how and best practices for tourism in the northern regions such as Iceland.
In this breakout session we want to explore possibilities of cooperation between the countries in the arctic on common set of principles for corporate social responsibility and sustainability.

Speakers:

  • Ketill Berg Magnússon, Managing Director of Festa – Icelandic Center for CSR: What can we learn from the Icelandic Responsible Tourism initiative?
  • Sigurður Jónsson, owner Aurora-Arktika expedition sailboats – Ísafjörður, Iceland: Touching the untouched with respect
  • Kelly S. Bricker, Vice-Chair of GSTC and Associate Professor at the University of Utah in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism: Global standards for Sustainable Tourism
  • Ásta Kristín Sigurjónsdóttir, CEO of Iceland Tourism Cluster: The Value of Sustainable Tourism in the Arctic

Arms race, arms control and disarmament in the Arctic – Russian-US dialogue

Organized by NRF-UArctic Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security (13. September 2017)

In security studies, there are discourses, premises and paradigms of security, as well as discussion who are the subjects of security. When it comes to the Arctic region there are on the one hand, heavy Russian and US military (nuclear weapon) structures, and the other hand, special features of security, e.g. nuclear safety and other environmental impacts by the military, as well as ‘new’ security threats, e.g. long-range pollution and climate change threatening human security. 

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Friday, October 13, 16:15 - 17:45
Location: Háaloft, Eighth Level

 

In spite of this, there in the Arctic is high geopolitical stability based on resilient international and interregional cooperation between the Arctic states and globally, which is a precondition for environmental protection, sustainable development and regional security. If the Arctic became ‘militarized’ in the Cold War, the post-Cold War security nexus of the Arctic is ‘environmentalized’ by growing concern on the environment. This session will discuss on the military policies and defense strategies of the Russian Federation and the U.S.A. the post-Cold War Arctic, and modernization of them. It will also discuss comprehensive and regional security via border management.

Speakers:

  • Michael T. Corgan, Associate professor, Pardee School at Boston University: America First or Arctic first: Changing US Priorities for the Arctic
  • Nikita Lomagin, Professor, European University in St. Petersburg: Russia's Security-Policy in the Arctic
  • Alexander Sergunin, Professor, St. Petersburg State University: The Changing Role of Military Power in the High North
  • Karen Everett, PhD Candidate, Trent University, Ontario: North American Arctic Border Management as a Strategy for Comprehensive Regional Security? 

Moderator:

  • Raimo Väyrynen, Professor, University of Lapland

Eu Arctic Policy: Climate Change, Science and Safeguarding the Arctic Enviorment

Organized by ICE-ARC (13. September 2017)

In their policy for the Arctic, the European Commission and High Representative declare that the European Union has a duty to protect the Arctic environment, strengthen ecosystem resilience, and promote sustainable development. This statement puts an obligation on the EU to work in partnership with Arctic countries and to recognise the livelihoods, needs, interests, and rights of the indigenous peoples and local communities within it. Furthermore, EU funded science has a central role to play in understanding Arctic change and safeguarding the Arctic environment.

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Friday, October 13, 16:15 - 17:45
Location: Akrafjall, Fourth Level

 

We can utilize science diplomacy to smooth a particularly tricky political situation, and importantly scientific knowledge can provide a conduit to ensure local communities, politicians and policy-makers, as well as industry leaders and the public, have the most up-to-date and robust information available. Easy access of this type of knowledge is exactly what is needed for effective decision making on sustainable development.
Within this session experts will provide a short overview of three climate change induced challenges for the Arctic environment:

  1. Thawing permafrost and the risk of depleting habitats and damaged infrastructure;
  2. The melting of the Greenlandic ice sheet and a rising sea level;
  3. The emissions of short-lived climate pollutants (such as black carbon and methane) and their contribution to an accelerated climate change.

Additionally, we will hear from experts their views on the responsibility of the space agencies to address these challenges, as well as the importance of the co-production of knowledge with local communities to ensure sustainable development within the Arctic and beyond.
These six experts will give brief introductions to these topics and subsequently open the floor for an interactive discussion focused around the following question:
How can the complex scientific issues associated with Arctic change, with all its implications, be summarised to better inform policy makers and facilitate sustainable development of the Arctic.

Speakers: 

  • Lene Kielsen Holm, Greenland Climate Research Centre, Greenland. Scientist and project leader: Sustainability and environmental pressures on Arctic communities
  • Hanne Christiansen, The University Centre in Svalbard, Norway, President, International Permafrost Association: Permafrost expert: Thawing permafrost and its impact on Arctic landscapes and infrastructures
  • Jonathan Bamber, University of Bristol, UK, President, European Geosciences Union: Ice sheet expert: The melting of the Greenlandic ice sheet and its contribution to global sea level rise
  • Daniela Domeisen, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Germany: Improved predictions for safeguarding Arctic development
  • Rene Forsberg, Danish Technical University-Space: The role of satellite observations in monitoring the Arctic
  • Kaarle Kupiainen, Finnish Environment Institute, co-chair of the AMAP EG on short-lived climate pollutants: Emissions and mitigation options for short-lived climate pollutants

Chair:

  • Jeremy Wilkinson, British Antarctic Survey, Coordinator of EU project ICE-ARC.

An Arctic of Regions: The Role of Subnational States in Arctic Governance

Organized by the Government of Québec (13. September 2017)

In this session, we will discuss and compare the role of three subnational states in Arctic governance: Alaska, Lapland (Finland), and Québec. Subnational states are closer to Arctic populations and their issues since they deliver services to these populations and regulate most of the resource development sector. 

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Saturday, October 14, 17:30 - 19:00

For this reason, subnational states are striving to play a bigger role in Arctic governance, notably through their participation to multilateral organizations such as the Arctic Circle and Arctic Council. In this session, government representatives and academics will try to answer the following questions:

  • What are the approaches Alaska, Lapland and Québec have taken to increase their participation in Arctic governance?
  • What is the impact of subnational states’ involvement on Arctic Governance?
  • What is the impact on Arctic geopolitics?

Speakers:

  • Craig Fleener, Arctic Policy Advisor and Director of State and Federal Relations, Office of the Governor of Alaska*
  • Michael Sfraga, Director, Polar Initiative, Wilson Centre
  • Mika Riipi, County Leader of Lapland, Finland
  • Lassi Heininen, Professor of Arctic Politics at the Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Lapland
  • Éric Théroux, Assistant Deputy Minister, Ministère des Relations internationales et de la Francophonie, Québec
  • Thierry Rodon, Institut nordique du Québec, Université Laval, Québec

Chair:

  • Emissary on Climate Change and Nordic Affairs, Gouvernement du Québec*

Bridges to Success - Driving Arctic and Ocean innovation through collaboration in Newfoundland and Labrador

Organized by the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, Memorial University, UArctic and Univeristy of Tromsø – the Arctic University of Norway (13. September 2017)

Industry, governments, and academia all have a role to play in innovation; however, they don’t always work together, sometimes leading to mistakes and missed opportunities. 

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Saturday, October 14, 08:00 - 09:00

Newfoundland and Labrador is home to a number of unique examples of ‘bridging institutions,’ organizations that support collaboration between the various stakeholders, and ensure that innovative research and technology is developed collaboratively, enhancing effectiveness and the likelihood of implementation. These organizations, including Memorial University’s C-Core, Office of Public Engagement, and Marine Institute work with industry, government, and community partners to turn ideas into solutions, bolster industry-led R&D and form the heart of successful sectoral clusters. This session will highlight examples of Newfoundland and Labrador’s collaborative approach to advancing innovation for solutions-based impacts, involving government, academia, and industry to address key issues of the North.

Speakers:

  • Honorable Christopher Mitchelmore, Minister of the Department of Tourism, Culture, Industry & Innovation, Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
  • Glenn Blackwood, Vice President, Fisheries and Marine Institute, Memorial University of Newfoundland
  • Isabella Pain, Deputy Minister of the Nunatsiavut Secretariat, Nunatsiavut Government, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

Chair:

  • Rob Greenwood, Executive Director, Public Engagement and the Leslie Harris Centre of Regional Policy and Development, Memorial University, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

Northern Sea Route – Impact on Global Trade

Organized by the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) (13. September 2017)

International trade continues to define the prosperity of national economies and even the development of cultures. Conversely, economic growth enhances the global trade, motivates the tariff reduction and other trade liberalization policies. About 80% of global trade relies on the maritime transport.

 

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Saturday, October 14, 16:00 - 17:30

Once the Northern Sea Route (NSR) becomes a viable transportation corridor to connect Europe and Asia, it may significantly re-shape the existing trade flows, which will also eventually have an impact on the political layout worldwide. To become operational on a large scale, the NSR requires massive investments, which may come from emerging Asian economies. This session will present and discusses a research project aimed at investigating the effects of an enhanced NSR onto the global trade under market, geo-political and climate uncertainty. The project intends to analyze plausible pathways, identify winners and losers, and suggest scenarios maximizing the benefits for as many interested parties as possible.

Speakers: 

  • Elena Rovenskaya, Director, Advanced Systems Analysis (ASA) Program, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, IIASA and
  • Michael Obersteiner, Program Director of the Ecosystems Services and Management (ESM) Program, Ecosystem Services and Management Program, IIASA: Northern Sea Route - A Game Changer for Global Trade?
  • Lawson W. Brigham, Distinguished Faculty, University of Alaska Fairbanks: The NSR: Gateway to Global Markets
  • Dmitry Yumashev, Senior Research Associate, Pentland Centre for Sustainability in Business of the Lancaster University, and Cambridge Centre for Climate Change Mitigation Research, University of Cambridge: Towards a Balanced View of Arctic Shipping: Estimating Economic Impacts of Emissions from Increased Traffic on the Northern Sea Route
  • Natsuhiko Otsuka, Professor, Arctic Research Center, Hokkaido University: Possibility and issues of liner shipping via the Northern Sea Route
  • Liisa Kauppila, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Turku and Rasmus Gjedssø Bertelsen, Professor, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway,: China-Arctic Maritime and Energy Systems in the Making: Functional Regionalisation in the High North
  • Tero Vauraste, President and Chief Executive Officer, Arctia Ltd., Chair of Arctic Economic Council: Business Perspective

Security and Insecurity in the Arctic and High North: Current Trends and Future Issues.

Organized by the University of York and the Hull Marine and Maritime Institute (University of Hull, UK) (7. September 2017)

It is perceptions of security and insecurity (broadly conceived) that will be discussed within this session. Building upon last year’s ‘Whose Arctic Security?’, and the 2015 session ‘Security Concerns in the Arctic’, the focus this year will be on emerging security trends.

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The aim is to make the most of the new ’60 minute’ discussion format by engaging with all delegates in attendance. Two short working papers will be presented, the room will then open out for discussion and debate about what should be considered as an emerging security or insecurity issue in the Arctic and High North context. This workshop discussion will feed into the ongoing ‘Broadening the Security Agenda in the Arctic’ project run by the University of York and the University of Hull.

Speakers:

  • Caroline Kennedy-Pipe, University of Hull: Whose Security? The Arctic, its People and its Resources
  • James I. Rogers, University of York: Arctic Drones and Emerging Technologies

Chair:

James I. Rogers, University of York

Marine & Coastal Arctic Tourism Management

Organized by the Icelandic Tourism Research Center (13. September 2017)

Marine and coastal tourism to the Arctic and high latitudes is increasing dramatically in parallel with international tourism growth more generally and polar tourism growth in particular. This increase is the product of improved maritime access, democratized international travel, and global climate change. Marine tourism, traditionally associated with cruising the high seas, coastal waterways or rivers, is also diversifying. Small day-tours including kayaking, scuba-diving, beach foraging, and island hopping; wildlife-based tourism (e.g., whale, seal, or bird watching), expeditions cruises, and large conventional cruises are all part of the tourism products on offer in the arctic realm. Nearly all Arctic and high-latitude tourists, marine or otherwise, visit the region to experience the natural resources and cultures of these places.

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Friday, October 13, 16:25 - 17:55

Location: Hafnarkot, Ground Level

 

Tourism can provide many direct benefits for tourists, destinations, and destination residents, and many indirect benefits for natural resource protection, cultural sustainability, and global society. Paradoxically, tourism can also damage the quality of natural resources, jeopardize the integrity of cultures, and endanger tourists and community members.

Whether tourism will be a pillar of or impediment to sustainability in the Arctic depends in large part on the actors participating in Arctic tourism management and administration and the actions they take. Actors in Arctic tourism are many and varied, including destination and natural resource managers, governmental and non-governmental administrators, community residents, tourism operators, emergency responders, scientists, and tourists themselves. Each of these actors has different, and potentially conflicting, perspective on and interests in tourism.

Understanding these perspectives and interests, and particularly their intersection and divergence is necessary to formulate and implement effective tourism policy. This session will critically consider the motivations and perspectives of diverse marine and coastal Arctic tourism actors and examine the different rhetoric and frames that these actors use to communicate and advance their perspectives.

This session will accomplish the following objectives:

  • Provide a broad, multi-faceted, and coherent picture of Arctic and high- latitude marine and coastal tourism.
  • Account for the social and environmental factors associated with managing Arctic and high-latitude marine and coastal tourism.
  • Produce a concrete description of Arctic marine and coastal tourism actors, motivations, and action
  • Demonstrate the application of discourse analysis for solving socio- environmental sustainability problems.
  • Addresstheneedforsustainabletourismdevelopmentandresponsible tourism practices in Arctic coastal communities and seascapes.



Panelist:

  • Auður Ingólfsdóttir, Rannsóknamiðstöð Ferðamála (Icelandic Tourism Research Center): Links between climate change, human security and sustainable marine and coastal tourism an Icelandic perspective
  • Frigg Jørgensen (Invited), Association of Arctic Expedition Cruise Operators -
  • Jessica Shadian, Arctic 360: Tourism search and rescue financing and community participation
  • Rebecca Pincus, US Coast Guard Academy: Emergency response, international relation, and security for maritime and coastal tourism
  • Sergey Shirokiy, World Commission on Protected Areas: Ecological and cultural issues, opportunities, and constraints in high-latitude tourism
  • Wilfred Richard, Uummannaq Polar Institute & Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center: Institutional and community dimensions of Arctic Tourism

Moderators: 

  • Edward Huijbens, University of Akureyri
  • Guðrun Þora Gunnarsdóttir, Icelandic Tourism Research Center
  • Nathan Reigner, Tourism consultant

Going local! - Arctic future strategies from a local perspective

Organized by: Institute of the North, Alaska, and CONOW (Centre for International Relations) (7. September 2017)

Nearly four million people live in the Arctic – less than 1% of the world’s population in 400 communities that span an area that is 15% of the world. Local and regional governments, who deliver essential services, represent these communities’ perspectives and priorities and advocate to the eight Arctic states the needs, challenges and opportunities of the region.


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The region’s communities are faced with the direct impacts of climate change and globalization – the lessening of sea ice extent, the increase in marine shipping and tourism, thawing permafrost and coastal erosion, lack of modern infrastructure and essential services, and new economic opportunities. In this dynamic and changing environment, it will be local communities who adapt, manage risk, and work to deliver benefits to community members.

To address these challenges and opportunities, the Arctic region needs new forums of cooperation, learning from- and sharing best practices, and to rethink global partnerships.

This breakout session brings together representatives from an historic Arctic Mayors Roundtable conducted in Fairbanks (May 2017) and the UN Habitat’s Urban Resilience Programme concept for the Arctic Resilient Cities Network to explore new and innovative approaches to cooperation, and to continue the development of pan-Arctic regional capacity building.

Speakers: 

  • Dan Lewis, Nairobi, Chief Risk Reduction Unit UN Habitat

Representatives from the Arctic Mayors Forum established in Fairbanks on May 11, 2017:

  • Mayor Ida Pinnerød, Bodø, Norway
  • Mayor Asii Chemnitz Narup, Sermersooq, Greenland
  • Mayor Eiríkur Björn Björgvinsson, Akureyri, Iceland

Chairs:

  • Christin Kristoffersen, Oslo, former Mayor of Svalbard, partner Conow & AAG
  • Nils Anderssen, Fairbanks, Director Institute of the North

Hydrocarbon Regulatory/Operational Safety Regimes in High-Stakes Arctic Environments

Organized by: SE2T International, Ltd., USA (7. September 2017)

Oil and gas exploration and production in the Arctic is a high-stakes proposition, given the fragile Arctic environment and the fast pace of change in the area due to the impacts of climate change. There is value to compare the causes and consequences of oil spills in the Arctic, and elsewhere. 

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Friday, October 13, 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Flói, Ground Level

Regarding hydrocarbons exploration and production, there are benefits in developing a uniform environmental safety approach in the Arctic, based on best practices. Comparative regulatory regimes and empirical data might yield a conversion to common regulations for the region. One possibility, inter alia, is the utilization of the Polar Code to improve oil safety in the Arctic. Application of risk management is a must to prevent and limit the impact of oil spills and its consequences, including marine life impacts.

SPEAKERS

  • June Borge Doornich, Associate Professor in Strategy and Control, Business School, Nord University: Regulative regimes for oil spill preparedness and response in the Barents Sea: A High Stake environment in the Arctic
  • “Brazil as an Example for Oil Spill Prevention Regulations in High-stakes Environments”
    • Celma Regina Hellebust, Lawyer, member of the Brazilian and Norwegian Bar Associations. Business consultant on Brazilian and Norwegian Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) regulations for the petroleum industry
    • Raphael Moura, PhD Student, Institute for Risk and Uncertainty University of Liverpool’s; Safety, Risk and Uncertainty Specialist on leave from the Brazilian oil and gas industry regulator (ANP)
  • Alexander Shestakov, Director, WWF Arctic Programme: Oil & Gas liability and stranded assets in the Arctic, visions and recommendations of the WWF Global Arctic Programme
  • Ekaterina Sokolova, Head of East Arctic Research Center; Researcher, Center for maritime international studies, Admiral Nevelskoy Maritime State University: Modern Arctic vessels of the Russian merchant marine fleet and ecological safety
  • Yuriy Zhuravel, Vice-rector, International Relations, Admiral Nevelskoy Maritime State University: Forces and means of search and rescue service of marine activities in the Arctic

Chair:

Sergio C. Trindade. President, SE2T International, Ltd. sustainable business consultants

Necessary Adaptations: Dialogue through Contemporary Art

Organized by the Anchorage Museum, Museum Cerny Inuit Collection and Nunavut Arts and Crafts Association (11. September 2017)

Ongoing changes in the Arctic––climatic, social and economic––are often mirrored in the contemporary art of artists who have a close connection with these challenges. This session is aimed at continuing the dialogue about how contemporary art (in all its forms) can create awareness and understanding about the impact and necessary adaptations that involve us all. 

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Saturday, October 14, 16:00 - 17:30
Location: Esja, Fifth Level

Speakers: 

  • Julie Decker, Director of the Anchorage Museum, Alaska, USA
  • Sonya Kelliher Combs, artist, Alaska, USA
  • Holly Nordlum, artist, Alaska, USA
  • Maya Sialuk Jacobson, Tattoo and visual artist, Greenland
  • Bill Nasogaluak, artist, Canada
  • Jesse Tungalik, Director of Nunavut Arts and Crafts, Canada
  • Martha Cerny, Curator, Bern, Switzerland
  • Anna Hudson, York University, Toronto

Policy networks and Arctic governance: Science and Business in Arctic Governance

Organized by: the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI) and Fridtjof Nansen Institute (FNI) (11. September 2017)

Outcomes of international cooperation are often seen as the result of relations between states. However, Arctic international environmental governance, like global governance elsewhere, is driven forward by policy networks that involve a much larger net of important players.

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Friday, October 13, 13:00 - 14:00

Location: Háaloft, Eighth Level

Many popular and academic accounts of Arctic governance acknowledge the important place of non-state actors in identifying Arctic environmental challenges and in negotiating possible regulatory responses at the international level. Yet little rigorous, empirical research has been done on how and when this influence over agenda-setting and decision-making/decision-makers serves to shape regulatory mechanisms. This panel seeks to explore these questions in relation to experts and business actors in a few cases of Arctic governance issues.

The session presents short research previews from the POLGOV project, including a sneak preview of the project’s effort to engage in experimental governance with the ‘Arctic Corporate Responsibility Index’ (ACRI). The ACRI will rank Arctic extractive businesses on various environmental and social indicators, with the hope that reputational gains and visibility can help fill regulatory and enforcement gaps. The brief research previews are followed by a panel discussion. Key themes for panel discussion will be: the role of science and expertise in an age of misinformation? What are the roles played by business and eNGOs in informing or shaping Arctic governance? How democratic are policy networks – and should they be more so?

Speakers:

  • Svein Rottem, FNI: Policy networks and oil spill prevention
  • Christian Prip, FNI: Policy networks and Arctic biodiversity
  • Leif Jensen, FNI: Policy networks – comparison to Antarctica
  • Indra Overland, NUPI: Arctic Corporate Responsibility Index

Panelists

  • Martin Sommerkorn, Head of Conservation, WWF Arctic Programme
  • Emma Wilson, Scott Polar Research Institute/ECW Consulting
  • Anatoli Bourmistov, High North Centre for Business, Nord University
  • Michael Denison, Group Political Advisor, BP

Chair:

Elana Wilson Rowe (NUPI)

Intersection Arctic: A Transdisciplinary Approach to Regional Environment Policy

Organized by: The Arctic Summer College, Ecologic Institute US, Ecologic Institute Berlin. (11. September 2017)

Over the course of its six-year history, the Arctic Summer College has established a formidable network of experts in Arctic policy, governance, and research, who are influencing the broader international discourse reshaping the approach to understanding the Arctic and inspiring new voices to participate in the process of reimagining the region’s future.

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This year’s breakout session highlights several of those new voices with the inaugural Arctic Summer College Yearbook, a compendium of original research from past years’ participants, as well as presentations from three distinguished 2017 Arctic Summer College Fellows, collectively articulating the diversity of Arctic research and individually addressing urban resilience in the Arctic, the financing of Arctic development, and collaborative approaches to sustainability research. A panel discussion with audience participation will follow with special focus on the possible intersections of Arctic policy research.

Speakers:

  • Divya Nawale, 2017 Arctic Summer College Fellow: How Arctic cities create climate resilience through policy and leadership
  • Emily Hewitt, 2017 Arctic Summer College Fellow: Lessons learned on traditional knowledge mapping and community-led research: Towards a Sustainable Fishery for Nunavummiut
  • Michael Mauer, 2017 Arctic Summer College Fellow: Arctic Development Fund: A New Funding Mechanism for the Arctic Region

Panelists:

  • Arne Riedel, Director, Arctic Summer College, Ecologic Institute – Berlin
  • Brendan O’Donnell, Editor, Arctic Summer College Yearbook, Ecologic Institute – Washington, DC
  • R. Andreas Kraemer, Founder, Arctic Summer College

Chair:

Max Gruenig, Director, Ecologic Institute US

Northern Sustainable Development Challenges : a Comparative Approach

Organized by the Government of Quebec (13. September 2017)

Québec has pledged to share its views with circumpolar experts on an annual basis. And as part of its promise, it proposes to hold a session at the 2017 Arctic Circle Assembly on the theme of the scientific challenges of northern development. 

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Friday, October 13, 16:15 - 17:45

Location: Ríma A, Ground Level

 

The talk will offer an original format whereby one Quebec and one international expert will team up to each present their own synopsis of a particular development challenge. This engaging format will provide an opportunity for inspiring dialogue as they share examples of some of the successful formulas employed worldwide in such vast social undertakings. The scientific challenges that will be addressed this year include energy, biofood, and environmental protection. There will also be a recap of the Fourth Arctic Circle Forum, which was held in Québec City under the theme Sustainable Development in Northern Regions: an Integrated and Partnership-based Approach and presented the unique model of Québec’s Plan Nord.

Speakers:

  • Robert Sauvé, President and CEO, Société du Plan Nord of Québec: Québec Arctic Forum Synthesis; Québec Northern governance: a model?
  • Louis Fortier, Scientific director and innovation of Institut nordique du Québec (INQ), Université Laval, Québec: Northern Sustainable Development : a scientific perspective
  • Jasmin Raymond, INQ-INRS Chairhollder on Northern Geothermal Potential Research, Québec: Are geothermal technologies a solution to energy challenges faced in Nunavik?
  • Juliet Newson, Director, Iceland School of Energy, Reykjavik University: The challenges of geothermal energy in Iceland
  • Murray Humphriesm, INQ-McGill Chairholder in Northern Research-Wildlife Conservation and Tradional Food Security, Québec: The traditional food systems of Indigenous Peoples of Northern North America
  • Gert Mulvad MD, GP, Doctor h.c., Greenland Center for Health Research, Ilisimatusarfik, University of Greenland: Traditional Food, Benefit/Risk communication in Artic communities
  • Adamie Delisle Alaku, Vice-president, Renewable Resources, Makivik Corporation, Québec: Nunavik Park Model

Moderator:

  • Maryse Lassonde, Scientific Director of the Québec Nature and Technology Research Fund

The Arctic as the field of SDGs

Organized by: Japanese Government (5. September 2017)

Regarding the SDGs of the United Nations, its essence is well represented in the following three sustainability.

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  • Environmental sustainability
  • Social-Economic sustainability
  • Human community sustainability

As an example of activities in terms of the natural sciences and humanities that Japan conducts in the Arctic region toward realize such sustainability, we introduce three projects from Arctic Challenge for Sustainability (ArCS) project currently underway and explore the possibility of cooperation with Arctic countries, indigenous people, observer countries, and other private sectors interested in the Arctic.

And we accept renowned researchers outside of Japan to this session.
They will give comments concerning Japan’s scientific activities and Arctic societal benefits (Especially the importance of a specific characteristics of scientific project from the viewpoint of contributing to society). Also they will point the possibility of new cooperation between science and society based on their special and distinguish experience.

Speakers:

  • Hiroyasu Hasumi; Professor, Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo: Prediction and predictability of the Arctic climate
  • Natsuhiko Otsuka; Professor, Arctic Research Center, Hokkaido University: Navigability and economic feasibility of Arctic shipping
  • Hiroki Takakura; Professor, Center for Northeast Asian Studies, Tohoku University: Permafrost and culture dynamics in Siberia

Panelist:

  • Larry Hinzman; Vice Chancellor for Research, University of Alaska Fairbanks
  • Jeremy P. Wilkinson; Senior scientist British Antarctic Survey

The Belt and Road Initiative: Implications for the Arctic

Organized by: Centre for Arctic Policy Studies, University of Iceland (5. September 2017)

Since 2013, China under President Xi Jinping has been developing a series of new trade routes over land and sea, which collectively have begun to be known as the ‘Belt and Road’. However, with the melting of Arctic Ocean ice, there is the growing possibility that China may be able to make use of the Northern Sea Route for expedited transit between Asia and Europe in the coming decades.

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So far Russia is the only Arctic Council member state that is a part of the Belt and Road Initiative. Will an ‘ice road’ be added to China’s growing cross-regional trade networks, and if so, how will this development affect Beijing’s expanding Arctic diplomacy and strategy? What does this mean for the other Arctic states? What are the challenges and opportunities for them in being a part of this initiative? This session will discuss the Belt and Road Initiative both from the perspective of China and the Arctic states.

Speakers:

  • Marc Lanteigne, Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Defence and Strategic Studies (CDSS) at Massy University, Auckland, New Zealand: China's Belt and Road and the Role of the Arctic
  • Egill Thor Nielsson: Executive Secretary, CNARC and Visiting Scholar, Polar Research Institute of China: An Ice Silk Road From China to the Nordics
  • Mingming Shi, Project manager: China's economic diplomacy in Greenland: an issue for Denmark?

Celebrating Erasmus in the Arctic

Organized by Rannís – Icelandic Centre for Research National Agency for the Erasmus+ Programme in Iceland (11. September 2017)

The EUs Erasmus+ programme has supported thousands of students and staff in the Arctic region. As this largest mobility programme in the world celebrates a 30th anniversary it is important to discuss what its contributions to developments in the Arctic have been and what can be expected from the programme in the future.

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Saturday, October 14, 20:00 - 21:00

The session will offer an overview of organised mobility in the Arctic region and an analysis of mobility flows at university level to and from Iceland, Norway, Sweden and Finland in particular. Interested stakeholders will then discuss future expectations. Past Erasmus grant holders are particularly encouraged to attend as well as those how are curious about how they could benefit from the programme that is now open to participation from non-European Union Arctic countries.

Appropriate light refreshments will be served to mark this festive occasion.

Speakers: 

  • Ágúst Hjörtur Ingþórsson, Head of Division at Rannís and director of Erasmus+ National Agency in Iceland: Erasmus in the Arctic – a look at organized mobility of students and academics in the Nordic countries
  • Rachael Lorna Johnstone, Professor, University of Akureyri: The Erasmus+ experience – personal reflections on the potential impact of Erasmus in the Arctic
  • Mana Tugend, Polar Law student at University of Akureyri and former Erasmus+ exchange student in Norway: The Erasmus+ experience

Moderator:

Pål Markusson (TBC), Vice President Mobility, The University of the Arctic

Global Risks and Opportunities Arising from Arctic Change

Organized by the Pentland Centre for Sustainability in Business, Lancaster University, UK and the EU ICE-ARC programme (13. September 2017)

The 90-minute roundtable event will bring together leading representatives from businesses, industries, national governments, NGOs, and academics, in order to provide clarity on some of the most pressing global and regional issues associated with Arctic change.

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Location: Háaloft, Eighth Level
Friday, October 13, 17:55 - 19:25

After a comprehensive overview of the latest scientific findings from the ICE-ARC consortium regarding the dominant risks and opportunities due to Arctic change, the discussion will focus on “Solutions”, as outlined by the following themes:

1. Translating research findings into climate policy
2. Sustainability transitions in Arctic maritime transport – insights from LNG in Northern Europe
3. Opportunities and risks for regional Arctic economy in Greenland
4. Can the future state of the Arctic sustain the global climate system?

The outcomes of the discussion will be summarised in the form of a policy briefing, which will be published by the ICE-ARC consortium and distributed via the EU, Arctic Circle, WBCSD, WEF, ECF and other channels.

For more information see - Invitation link

Panelists: 

  • Gail Whiteman: Welcome and Introduction to the ICE-ARC project and the Roundtable Event
  • Dmitry Yumashev: Implications of Arctic climate feedbacks for the world’s ability to achieve the long-term climate targets from the Paris Agreement
  • Dmitry Yumashev: Climatic implications and economic benefits of moving industries to the Arctic: the case of transit shipping via the Northern Sea Route
  • Paul Young: The Arctic as a barometer of global climate risk: correlations between sea ice decline and global crop yields’ losses

Speakers:

  • Chris Hope, Reader in Policy Modelling at Judge Business School, and Visiting Professor at University College, London: Translating research findings into climate policy
  • Domagoj Baresic, Doctoral Researcher at University College London, Energy Institute: Sustainability transitions in Arctic maritime transport - insights from LNG in northern Europe
  • Hilmar Ögmundsson, senior advisor in the Greenlandic Ministry of Finance: Opportunities and risks for regional Arctic economy in Greenland
  • Rafe Pomerance, Chairman of Arctic 21: Can the future state of the Arctic sustain the global climate system?
  • Dmitry Yumashev and Gail Whiteman: Concluding remarks

Chair:

Gail Whiteman (Director of the Pentland Centre, Lancaster University & Professor in Residence at WBCSD)

Energy Security in Remote Communities

Organized by: Navigo (14. September 2017)

The Arctic is a global leader in renewable energy development with approximately 50% of power produced from renewables. This is however not the case for the off grid communities in the Arctic that rely on diesel fuel for electricity and heat. The total population of these settlements is nearly 2 million people. Many of these communities are looking for ways to replace diesel generators with renewable energy. Finding the right combination of technologies, storage and transmission

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Sunday, October 15, 12:45 - 13:45

Finding the right combination of technologies, storage and transmission can however be challenging. The session will provide an overview of the cutting-edge solutions being implemented to address renewable energy security in remote arctic communities. A look at how a variety of renewable energy solutions can be deployed in remote communities for renewable energy independence. Exploring opportunities for community development, commercial development, and tourism. Participants will cover both models for and examples of successful community transitions and specific technology solutions.

Panelists:

  • Peter Vangsbo, Nordic Business Developer, Climate-KIC Nordic
  • Guðmundur Sigurðarsson, CEO of Vistorka Company: Creative Approaches to Renewable Energy Independence
  • Gwen Holdmann, Director, Alaska Center for Energy & Power*: Lab services for remote microgrid technology & deployment
  • Jay Friedlander, Professor and Sharpe-McNally Chair of Green and Socially Responsible Business: Make sustainability strategic with the Abundance Cycle

Chair:

  • Ágústa Ýr Þorbergsdóttir, Director, Navigo

Creative Approaches to Communicating Climate Change

Organized by the World Policy Institute, Arctic in Context Initiative (3. October 2017)

The Arctic is a widely cited harbinger of global warming, examined in detail, presented to policy makers and business leaders, often as an open source document readily accessible to a general audience. However, despite policy papers and mass media coverage the written word alone is an insufficient means of communicating the extent of abrupt and extreme environmental changes.

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Saturday, October 14, 11:20 - 12:20
Location: Kaldalón, First floor

To fill this void, a range of arts practitioners, scientists and academics work in collaboration to draw attention to what has been called the most pressing threat of the twenty-first century.

This session aims to stimulate vibrant discussions of interdisciplinary perspectives on the diverse ways in which art, culture and climate change intersect. Following brief presentations to provide a foundation for discussion, an interactive dialogue will take place between panelists and audience members. The arts in dialogue with an audience can be a powerful means of connecting the human experience with nature.

Speakers:

  • Diane Burko, Explorer, Activist, Painter and Photographer whose work focuses on the intersection of Art and Climate Change: Inspiration, Translation, Communication: from Bearing Witness in the Arctic to Creating Art to Exhibitions Communicating the Issues
  • Laura Petrovich-Cheney, Sculptor and Educator: The Intersection of Walking, Art and Education: a Journey North
  • Dario Schwoerer, Climatologist, explorer and climate activist: Topic: Climate Change - a blessing for the Arctic? The findings and conclusion of the 17 years long Top to Top Global Climate Expedition
  • Diane Tuft, Mixed-Media Artist, The Arctic Melt: Images of a Disappearing Landscape

Chair:

Erica M. Dingman, Fellow, World Policy Institute; Director, Arctic in

The Arctic Futures Initiative: A Systems Analysis Perspective on the Plausible Futures of the Arctic

Organized by: The International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) (5. September 2017)

The Arctic is rapidly changing. Policy makers, governments, investors, environmental communities and indigenous communities need to reconcile continued economic development within the Arctic while safeguarding environmental and socio-cultural values and livelihoods.

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Saturday, October 14, 11:20 - 12:20
Location: Skarðsheiði, Third Level

Phenomena that are studied independently often interact in overlooked ways, and these interactions call for a systemic holistic analysis and solutions that do not yet exist. The objective of this session on the Arctic Futures Initiative (AFI) is to 1) illustrate the holistic approach through two science highlights and presentation on stakeholder contribution; 2) obtain input through interactive discussion with the participants of the Arctic Circle Assembly as representatives of different communities including science, policy, business and civil society. The Initiative is coordinated by the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), working in partnership with the Arctic Circle and others providing comprehensive analysis and synthesis for the Arctic nations and non-Arctic countries alike. 

Speaker:

  • Pavel Kabat, Director General and CEO of IIASA: Welcome
  • “Short-Lived Climate Forcers and the Arctic”
    • Kaarle Kupiainen, SYKE and IIASA
    • Zbigniew Klimont, Air Quality and Greenhouse Gases (AIR) Program, IIASA
  • Markus Amann, Air Quality and Greenhouse Gases (AIR) Program, IIASA
  • "Permafrost Thawing Strongly Reduces Allowable CO2 Emissions"
    • Thomas Gasser, Ecosystem Services and Management (ESM) Program, IIASA
    • Michael Obersteiner, Ecosystem Services and Management (ESM) Program, IIASA
  • Lassi Heininen, University of Lapland and IIASA: Stakeholders Contributions for Arctic Policy Shaping and Making
  • Timur Makhmutov, Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC): East-Asian countries - AC observers - interests to cooperate in the Arctic*

Chair:

Anni Reissell, IIASA and University of Helsinki

A new ocean on top of the world - challenges and opportunities for its protection and governance

Organized by Greenpeace Nordic (7. September 2017)

The Arctic is warming at a rate of almost twice the global average and consequently is experiencing severe climate impacts – including the alarmingly rapid disappearance of sea ice, revealing a ‘new ocean’ at the top of the world. The Central Arctic Ocean (CAO) hosts a unique, outstanding and sensitive marine environment, and yet it remains one of the least protected marine environments globally.

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Friday, October 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Ríma B, Ground Level

During recent years the Arctic Coastal States have invited international fishing nations for discussions on precautionary measures, as the area will become accessible to fisheries in the future. At the global level, the United Nations are currently developing an implementing agreement under the United Nations Law of the Sea Convention on the conservation and sustainable use of marine Biological diversity of areas
Beyond National Jurisdiction (BBNJ). This new instrument provides with an unmatched opportunity to protect global oceans, the CAO included.

During this session we will discuss the need to protect the CAO, and what governance initiatives like th BBNJ mean for the area. A new ocean on top of the world - challenges and opportunities for its protection and governance

Speakers: 

  • Magnus Eckeskog, Greenpeace Nordic: Introduction
  • Timo Koivurova, Research Professor University of Lapland: Governance of the Arctic marine environment - opportunities and challenges
  • Kristina Gjerde, High Seas Policy Advisor IUCN: A UN treaty to protect biodiversity in Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction
  • Veronica Frank, Political Advisor, Greenpeace International: Greenpeace´s vision for ocean governance

Chair:

Magnus Eckeskog, Greenpeace Nordic

Challenges and possibilities in the north: Emerging markets and sustainability in arctic tourism

Organized by the Arctic Working Group of the Danish Parliament (11. September 2017)

The beauty of the Arctic areas attracts increasing numbers of tourists every year. For Iceland the past decades’ tourist boom continues, whilst tourism in emerging markets like the Faroe Islands and Greenland presents unexplored possibilities for economic growth and social benefits. However, new opportunities also present new challenges.

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Saturday, October 14, 16:00 - 17:30
Location: Ríma B, Ground Level

As sparsely populated natural environments are ever more exposed to tourists, infrastructure and area management are often found lacking. The dilemma pushes public and local authorities to develop policies geared for accommodating the increased number of tourists without jeopardizing natural or cultural environment. Focusing on emerging markets and sustainability, this session opens with a talkshow on the Icelandic case, and what the Faroe Islands and Greenland can learn from it. Sustainability and long-term considerations are seen as key to a successful tourism policy package, and therefore the session’s second part will present the case of the sustainability certification of Snæfellsnes regional park.

Speakers:

  • Aaja Chemnitz Larsen, Member of the Danish Parliament
  • Aleqa Hammond, Member of the Danish Parliament
  • Árni Gunnarsson, Managing Director, Air Iceland
  • Helga Árnadóttir, Managing Director, Icelandic Travel Industry Associations
  • Jóhan Pauli Helgason, Adviser, Faroese Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade
  • Magni Arge, Member of the Danish Parliament; former CEO of Atlantic Airways
  • Ragnhildur Sigurðardóttir, Director, Snæfellsnes Regional Park
  • Sjúrður Skaale, Member of the Danish Parliament; Chairman of the Arctic Working Group
  • Stefán Gíslason, Senior Sustainability Consultant and Owner; Environice Consulting
  • Yewlin Tay, Director of Sales & Marketing, Arctic Wonderland Tours

Chair:

The Arctic Working Group of the Danish Parliament

Observing the Arctic Council

Organized by the West Nordic Council (27. September 2017)

The breakout session will focus on the following questions: What is the role of observers in the Arctic Council? How can they contribute to and influence the work of the Council? What should an inter-parliamentary organization like the West Nordic Council focus on in its efforts to contribute to and impact the work of the Arctic Council?

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Friday, October 13, 17:55 - 19:25

Location: Ríma B, Ground Level

Last May the West Nordic Council was granted observer status to the Arctic Council. The West Nordic Council is currently developing the strategic framework for its observership for 2018-2020. The main overall objective is to decrease the democratic deficit in the Arctic by making sure that the voice of the inhabitants of the region is heard and their rights protected.
The session gives an insight into the work, role and influence of observers to the Arctic Council, with contributions from four different observers. A Senior Arctic Official in the Arctic Council will furthermore shed a light on how those governing the Arctic Council view the role of observers and the value of their contribution. The West Nordic Council hopes for a lively discussion that can provide valuable input into the work on the aforementioned strategic framework.

Speaker:

  • Bryndís Haraldsdóttir, Vice-President of the West Nordic Council, and MP, Iceland: Introduction.
  • Eirik Sivertsen, Chair of the Standing Committee of Arctic Parliamentarians (SCPAR), and MP, Norway: Arctic Parliamentarians and the Arctic Council
  • Nauja Bianco, Senior Advisor at the Nordic Council of Ministers: A Pragmatic Reciprocal Approach to Being an Observer in the Arctic Council – a Nordic Case.
  • Allen Pope, Executive Secretary of the International Arctic Science Committee: Contributing Scientific Expertise to the Arctic Council.
  • Árni Þór Sigurðsson, Ambassador for Arctic Affairs, Senior Arctic Official, Iceland: How can the observers influence the work of the Arctic Council?

The Greenlandic ice service in a changing Arctic

Organized by Danish Meteorological Institute (13. September 2017)

The change and reduction of the Arctic sea ice regime has opened new possibilities for shipping in Greenland waters, ranging from small pleasure boats to tankers and cruiseships with 1000+ passengers/crew on board. 

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Sunday, October 15, 08:00 - 09:00 Despite thinning of the ice and longer operating windows for ships there is an increasing and very significant interest for accurate and timely ice products focused shipping requirements. Greenland Waters are never totally free of ice. Outside the sea ice season glacial ice remain posing a constant hazard to marine activity. The recent implementation of IMO Polar Code and national regulations on mandatory pilotage for larger passenger vessels have highlighted the need for a development of future ice services.

Speakers:

  • Marianne Thyrring, Director General the Danish Meteorological Institute: The importance of ice service and international collaboration
  • Keld Qvistgaard: Senior Ice Advisor, Client Relations Manager: The DMI Greenland Ice Service – new requirements, new possibilities

The Quiet Revolution: Sensing the Arctic with Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

Organized by: World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), NERC Arctic Office, United Kingdom (11. September 2017)

The cryosphere is a major indicator of global climate change and plays a fundamental role in the climate system. Despite advances in numerical modeling, the reliability of weather forecasts and long-term climate predictions in the Arctic and Antarctic is severely limited by the lack of systematic in situ observations in those regions, and even more so under the sea-ice. 

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Because of their potential scalability, low risk and cost-effectiveness, Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are offering a new paradigm for the monitoring and sustainable management of polar and high latitude regions to complement satellite observations. These innovative platforms offer opportunities in a wide variety of science disciplines and practical applications and services .The session will involve keynote presentations to illustrate recent advances in the field, followed by a panel discussion to review opportunities and challenges in using autonomous vehicles for polar research and operational services.

Speakers: 

  • Phil Anderson - Head of Marine Technology, Scottish Association for Marine Science, United Kingdom
  • Craig M. Lee, APL, Senior Principal Oceanographer, Applied Physics Laboratory, Professor, School of Oceanography, University of Washington: Multi-platform Autonomous Approaches for Sustained Arctic Observing
  • Emanuel Ferreira Coelho: Challenges and solutions using robotic networks to characterize the Ocean-Acoustic Underwater Environments in the High North
  • Thorben Wulff, AWI, Bremerhaven, Germany: The coupling between physical and ecological processes - fine scale investigations with an AUV in the Arctic

Climate-service innovation & enhancing climate-resilience in Arctic businesses

Organized by: Climate-KIC Aps (22. September 2017)

The development of climate-services has been a much-trumpeted ambition of policymakers globally as part of the effort to limit the damages and risks caused by the onset of climate change. Climate-services are a key mechanism to close the gap between research institutions and business. In the Arctic, climate-services represent a unique opportunity to create tangible benefit from work being conducted at the forefront of climate science; to enhance the climate-resilience of Arctic industries whilst, providing forward-thinking businesses with new opportunities to achieve blue-green growth.

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Sunday, October 15, 08:00 - 09:00

This session is designed to present the benefits of climate-services; evaluate their value to the long-term climate-resilience strategies of Arctic businesses; discuss why and how such services are to be made available to all Arctic stakeholders; and explore how climate-service development and development of other climate-resilient innovations can be accelerated to meet the growing demands of the Arctic economy.
By conducting this session we hope to further build upon the audiences pre-existing knowledge of what climate-services are and what they can achieve. We would like to draw their attention to the work of “beyond state-of-the-art” research projects such as Blue-Action (EU Horizon 2020 project) and the implications that such work can have for businesses, communities and other such organizations operating in the Arctic region.
Drawing on the first-hand experiences of some of our speakers, we want to transmit to the audience the needs and opportunities of smaller and larger Arctic businesses, with concrete examples of how the products of climate-service development can be effectively incorporated into a long-term business strategy.
Finally, we aim to get the audience to think about the future of the development of climate-service and other climate-related technologies, and what “infrastructure” is needed to foster innovation in this field.

Speakers:

  • Mark Payne, Senior Researcher, Danish Technical University: Introduction to climate-services: the opportunities and the benefits
  • Mads Randbøll Wolff, Project Manager Nordic Ministry Council for the Nordic Pavilion at COP23: Arctic SME’s and achieving climate resilience
  • Øvin Aarnes, DNV GL: Climate-services and their role in long-term business strategy

Panel: 

  • Peter Vangsbo, Nordic Business Developer Climate-KIC: Facilitating greater innovation within climate services and climate-resilience, breaking down knowledge silos

Moderator:

  • Solveig Zophoniasdottir, Climate KI 

Climate change and security – searching for a paradigm shift

Organized by NRF-UArctic Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security (13. September 2017)

The focus of this session is comprehensive security, and how discourses on environmental and human security have shown a need for changes in problem definition of security. The post-Cold War Arctic with special features of security (e.g., nuclear safety), as well as a shift in premises from military to environmental security (e.g., due to pollution), is seriously faced by grand challenges / wicked problems, particularly by the combination of pollution and climate change.

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Saturday, October 14, 16:00 - 17:30
Location: Kaldalón, Ground Level

Rapid climate change and the Anthropocene can be interpreted as global factors promoting a peaceful change, though this is not determined but needs action. This session will argue that there is a growing need for discourse and paradigm shift in approach of traditional (nationally-defined) security due to (rapid) climate change. There is a plan to produce a publication based on this session, which would continue the publication series by the TN on Geopolitics and Security (see, Future Security of the Global Arctic (2016), Security and Sovereignty in the North Atlantic (2014) by Palgrave Pivot).

Speakers: 

  • Heather Exner-Pirot, Strategist for Outreach and Indigenous Engagement, University of Saskatchewan: Between Militarization and Disarmament: Challenges for Arctic Security in the 21st Century
  • Salla Kalliojärvi, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Lapland: Global Security, Policy and the Arctic under Changing Climate: Examining the Climate Security Discourse
  • Wilfrid Greaves, Assistant Professor of International Relations, University of Victoria: Cities, Security, and Environmental Change in a Warming Arctic
  • Sanna Kopra, Post-doc, University of Lapland: China, Climate Change and International Security: Changing Attributes of Great Power Responsibility

Chair:

  • Lassi Heininen, Professor, University of Lapland

In the Centre of Greenland Climate Research

Organized by the Greenland Climate Research Centre at the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources. (11. September 2017)

The Greenland Climate Research Centre (GCRC) is an interdisciplinary research group combining climate research in social and natural sciences. Placed in Greenland and part of the Greenlandic society, GCRC has unique knowledge about Greenlandic marine ecosystem, the dynamics created by the melt from the icecap and the effects on the Greenlandic society.

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Friday, October 13, 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Akrafjall, Fourth Level

Besides GCRC is a strong partner in the development of the new educational initiatives in natural and health sciences at Ilisimatusarfik (University of Greenland). In the first presentation the newly announced strategy for GCRC will be presented together with an overview of the new educational activities in Greenland. In the three following presentations speakers will present new results, activities, future plans and importance and value to the society within three key research areas of GCRC. The presentations will be followed by discussions and questions.

Speakers: 

  • Malene Simon, Head of the Greenland Climate Research Centre: New strategy for the Greenland Climate Research Centre.
  • Lorenz Meire, PostDoc, Greenland Climate Research Centre: Effects of glacial melt on marine ecosystems.
  • Diana Krawczyk, Scientist, Greenland Climate Research Centre: Benthic Mapping in the Arctic.
  • Caroline Bouchard, Scientist at the Greenland Climate Research Centre: Pelagic Ecosystem Monitoring.

The need for Arctic Safety training

Organized by: University Centre in Svalbard – UNIS, University of the Arctic – UArctic, International Network for Terrestrial Research and Monitoring in the Arctic – INTERACT II (11. September 2017)

The natural environment in the Arctic is undergoing rapid change, while at the same time the interest in presence and economic development in the region have never been greater. As a consequence there is a need for increased competence and sharing of experience in how to operate in a safe and environmentally best way in the Arctic.


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Saturday, October 14, 11:20 - 12:00
Location: Viðey, Second Level

An Arctic Safety Centre is being developed at the University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS) together with several national and international partners. The mission of this Centre is to contribute to safe and sustainable human field activity in the Arctic through research and education.

Focus will be on developing a comprehensive university level research-based educational program within the Centre’s framework.

Speakers:

  • Morten Rasch, Leader Station Manager forum; INTERACT II, University of Copenhagen: Cooperation between INTERACT and Arctic Safety Centre on Arctic safety
  • Lars Kullerud, President of the University of the Arctic: UArctic’ and participation in Arctic Safety Centre
  • Ann Christin Auestad, Project Manager; Arctic Safety Centre, University Centre in Svalbard: Arctic Safety Centre project description
  • Hanne Hvidtfeldt Christiansen, Professor, Department leader; Arctic Geology, University Centre in Svalbard: Using natural science data and technology for improved Arctic Field safety

Chair:

Hanne Hvidtfeldt Christiansen, Professor, Department leader; Arctic Geology, University Centre in Svalbard

Economic development, innovation and entrepreneurship in the Arctic

Organized by: Nordic Council of Ministers (NCM) and Arctic Economic Council (AEC) (7. September 2017)

The Nordic Council of Ministers (NCM) and the Arctic Economic Council (AEC) are conducting an “Arctic Business Analysis” to qualifyknowledge on the business environment needed in the Arctic to take it one step further, including identifying how the Nordic countries can support economic development in the Arctic in a pragmatic and result orientated way.

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Friday, October 13, 16:25 - 17:55

Location: Kaldalón, Ground Level

The analysis will focus on business development cases to be scaled to other themes and geographical areas and aims at representing important practical lessons learned for other companies.

NCM and AEC wish to present and test preliminary findings of the analysis. The ambition is to discuss conditions for business in the Arctic with a range of stakeholders in the field of business development and investments. By having an open and interactive breakout session the objective is to solicit feedback on the findings of the “Arctic Business Analysis” and generate discussions on identifying best practices and solutions on Nordic Arctic business development, innovation and entrepreneurship that could also be applicable on a pan-Arctic level.

Speakers: 

  • Nauja Bianco, Nordic Council of Ministers: Welcome and introduction – “The change agents of tomorrow – Promoting a pan-Arctic business community through Nordic facilitation”
  • Jakob Wichmann, CEO and Co-founder, Voluntas Advisory: Presentation of preliminary findings of the Arctic Business Analysis
  • Mikhail Pogodaev, Chair, Association of World Reindeer Herders, Director of The Northern Forum: Indigenous people’s perspective on business development in the Arctic

Case discussions:

  • Robert Gudfinnsson, CEO of Genis, entrepreneur and investor (Iceland): How to drive innovation and entrepreneurship in the Arctic region
  • Stephen Hart, Head of Office, European Investment Bank: Financing business development and investments in the Nordic Arctic – opportunities and demand
  • Thomas Westergaard, Senior Vice President, Hurtigruten: Tourism as an enabler of business development in the Arctic
  • Liv La Cour Belling, Project Coordinator, Secretariat for the Nordic Council of Ministers for Fisheries and Aquaculture, Agriculture, Food and Forestry: Arctic’s bio-economy as a stepping stone for growth in the Arctic
  • Tero Vauraste, Chair of the Arctic Economic Council, President and CEO of Arctia Ltd: How to move the business development agenda in the Arctic forward

Chair:

Voluntas Advisory and Confederation of Danish Industry

The potential of offshore geothermal energy in the Arctic – case studies from Iceland and Canada

Organized by North Tech Energy ehf (13. September 2017)

The objective of the project is to create a detailed plan for seafloor exploration needed to collect additional information about potential offshore fields that are located in the southwest of Reykjanes and in the north between two peninsulas in northern Iceland, Tröllaskaga and Melrakasléttu. Today offshore geothermal research and exploration techniques rely mainly on techniques used for oil and gas exploration.

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Saturday, October 14, 11:20 - 12:20
Location: Hafnarkot, Ground Level

The aim of the project is to adapt the techniques to geothermal exploration standards known for onshore exploration.Geothermal energy has been utilized on land for over 100 years. The world´s geothermal resources have the potential to be one of the largest sustainable renewable energy options. With rising energy prices and increased knowledge of geothermal utilization the idea of developing and using offshore energy becomes more and more attractive. Europe and the rest of the world have a great offshore geothermal potential, in areas that have not yet been explored. By developing offshore geothermal fields in Iceland new approaches and technics will be developed for geothermal utilization. Knowledge of geothermal utilization and development in Iceland is extensive, which makes Iceland well situated in developing this pilot project. The project may serve as a lighthouse project for other potential offshore geothermal fields to be developed around the world in the future.

Speakers: 

  • Geir Brynjar Hagalinsson, CEO & Founder North Tech Energy: How to utilize Offshore Geothermal Energy around Iceland. Cross Fertilization with Oil and Gas Industry
  • Bjarni Richter, Marketing- and Project Manager, Senior Geologist Iceland Geosurvey (ISOR): Potential of Geothermal Energy of the Coast of Iceland. The Difference Between Onshore and Offshore Geothermal Fields
  • Odd-Geir Lademo Research Manager at SINTEF: Industrial Partnerships and R&D portfolio to realize Offshore Geothermal Energy

Chair:

Ágústa Ýr Þorbergsdóttir, Director, NAVIGO

The Nordic Universities’ role in the New Arctic

Organized by AAU Arctic, Aalborg University (7. September 2017)

The proposed breakout session will present the conclusions from a researcher forum arranged by The Nordic Universities Association (Nordisk Universitets Samarbejde) on the topic of the Nordic Universities role in shaping the new Arctic.

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Friday, October 13, 16:25 – 17:55

Location: Esja, Fifth Level

The forum will take place on October 12th 2017 at University of Iceland, just prior to Arctic Circle.

The session will be structured according to the focus areas of the researcher forum, with five presentations on the role of the Nordic Universities in relation to, what is considered to be five grand challenges in the Arctic.

Speakers:

  • Per Michael, Rector Aalborg University, Chair of the board of Nordic Universities Association: Opening remark
  • Anne Husebekk, Rector UiT, Tromsø University: Sustainable business development
  • Timo Koivurova, Director of Arctic Centre in Finland, University of Lapland: Climate and environmental protection
  • Lill Rastad Bjørst, Research Coordinator, AAU Arctic: Robust and independent welfare communities
  • Anne Merrild Hansen, Ilisimatusarfik, Professor at Ilisimatusarfik, University of Greenland: Education and cooperation

Chair:

Henrik Halkjær, Dean of the faculty of Humanities at Aalborg University and head of the board of AAU Arctic

Contemporary Issues of Gender in the Arctic

Organized by the Northern Research Forum, the Icelandic Arctic Cooperation Network and the Centre for Arctic Policy Studies at the University of Iceland (14. September 2017)

The purpose of this session is to further promote an extensive, policy relevant dialogue on gender in the Arctic and to continue to raise awareness of the situation of men and women in the region. 

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Saturday, October 14, 11:20 - 12:20
Location: Norðurljós, Second Level

The session builds on themes addressed at the conference “Gender Equality in the Arctic: Current realities Future Challenges” – held in Iceland in October 2014 - and includes topics such as Political Representation and Participation in Decision-Making: Gendered Dimensions; Regional Socio-Economic Development and its Gendered Impacts; Climate and Environmental Change, Natural Resource Development, and Gender; (Re-)Construction of Gender in the Arctic; Human Security: Gendered Aspects; and Human Capital and Gender: Migration, Mobility, Education and Adaptation, Indigenous peoples and underrepresented minorities of the Arctic. The session is one of the NRF Panel organized together with the Northern Research Forum (NRF), the Icelandic Arctic Cooperation Network (IACN) and the GlobalArctic Project.

Speakers:

  • Kristín Ástgeirsdóttir, Director, Centre for Gender Equality Iceland: Gender Equality in the Arctic - Diversity is Key
  • Silja Bára Ómarsdóttir, Adjunct Lecturer, University of Iceland: Full and Substantive Gender Equality - How to Get Away from Symbolic Representation and Counting Heads
  • Gunhild Hoogensen Gjørv, Nansen Professor, UNAK/Professor, UiT-The Arctic University of Norway: The Role of Trust In Human Security In The Arctic: A Gender-Based Analysis
  • Henri Myrttinen, the Head of Gender, International Alert, Peacebuilding Organisation, London: Gender Champions and Feminist Foreign Policies: Bringing in Critical Masculinities Perspectives into Gender Policy in the Arctic Region

Chair:

Gunn-Britt Retter, Head of Arctic and Environmental Unit of the Saami Council

Connecting Arctic science with decision-making - from IASC to the Arctic Council

Organized by: International Arctic Science Committee (IASC) (14. September 2017)

The session “From IASC to the Arctic Council - connecting Arctic science with decision-making” builds upon recent efforts of the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC) to enhance its capacity to provide advice on issues of science in the Arctic and the communication of scientific knowledge to policymakers.

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Saturday, October 14, 17:30 - 19:00

Invited speakers will discuss matters and challenges of connecting Arctic science with decision-making and of scientific cooperation in the region. Among others, they will cover case studies of non-Arctic countries involved in Arctic research, implementation of the Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation signed by Arctic states in May 2017, the MOSAiC project and the role of science in work of the Arctic Council. Following short presentations by each speaker, the floor will be open to questions and comments from the audience to further inform IASC’s efforts in more effective provision of scientific knowledge and advice to policy-makers.

Speakers:

  • Volker Rachold, Head, German Arctic Office, Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Center for Polar and Marine Research: Collaboration between International Arctic Science Committee and the Arctic Council – from the past into the future
  • Lars-Otto Reiersen, Executive Secretary, Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP) Arctic Council Working Group: From scientific input to policy recommendations in assessing state of Arctic environment
  • Henry Burgess, Head, NERC Arctic Office, British Antarctic Survey, UK: A non-Arctic country perspective on connecting Arctic science to decision-making: successes, challenges and hopes for the future
  • Allison A. Fong, MOSAiC Ecosystems Working Group Coordinator, Postdoctoral Scholar, Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Germany: MOSAiC – forging international cooperation towards enhancing our understanding of regional and global consequences of Arctic climate change
  • Kelly Falkner, Director, Office of Polar Programs, National Science Foundation, US: Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation – next steps and practical implications

Chair:

  • Gosia Smieszek, Researcher, Arctic Centre, University of Lapland / Fellow, IASC

Arctic project development: testing the law? - Legal challenges of large Infrastructure projects - The example of the Finnafjord Port

Organized by the University of Iceland Faculty of Law and bremenports GmbH & Co. KG (7. September 2017)

The Session aims at highlighting the legal challenges of infrastructure development in the Arctic, mainly from the viewpoint of Icelandic law. It will focus on environmental law, harbour law and concession regimes, which play an important role if private capital is to be attracted to environmentally sensitive projects. The FINNAFJORD HARBOUR PROJECT in North-Eastern Iceland will be used to illustrate challenges in this respect.


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Saturday, October 14, 11:20 - 12:20
Location: Esja, Fifth Level

The moderated session will bring together four speakers from various backgrounds, including project development organisations as well as academia. The Session is partially based on findings of a research project on Arctic law which is administered inter alia by the University of Iceland, Faculty of Law, and sponsored by the Government of Iceland.

Speakers:

  • Aðalheiður Jóhannsdóttir, Professor of Law, Dean of Faculty of Law, University of Iceland: Environmental impact assessment regulations, from a general point of view and/or in the specific context of greenfield port development projects
  • Friðrik Árni Friðriksson Hirst, Co-Director of the Arctic Law Institute, University of Iceland, and Attorney at Juri: General provisions of the Harbour Act no. 61/2003 and their application to large-scale greenfield port development projects. What issues does the Harbour Act pose with regard to private ownership and financing of ports, including bankability
  • Lars Stemmler, bremenports GmbH & Co. KG, Head of International Projects: Use of public-private partnerships (PPP) for the provision and financing of complex infrastructure development projects – possible legal and political implications
  • James E. Pass, Guggenheim Partners LLC, Senior Managing Director, Municipal and Infrastructure Sector Manager and Portfolio Manager: Legal requirements from an project developer´s point of view, in particular concessioning – Case study Finnafjord

Chair:

Robert Howe, Managing Director, bremenports GmbH & Co. KG

The UK and the Arctic and Nordic regions: Opportunities for trade and inverstment

Organized by: Polar Research and Policy Initiative (13. September 2017)

The session will explore opportunities for trade and investment between the UK and Arctic/Nordic states. It will bring together speakers representing different sectors: infrastructure; architecture; shipping; energy; education; and arts and culture. 

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Sunday, October 15, 12:45 - 13:45

The session will commence with the chair discussing the current state of affairs with respect to the UK and the Arctic and Nordic regions. Subsequently, each panellist will make a short presentation highlighting strengths and opportunities in their particular sectors. This will be followed by a Q&A session for 30 minutes. The key objective of the panel is to help attendees understand what opportunities might exist, what support they can expect from us, and how best they can access the UK market.

Speakers:

  • Dwayne Ryan Menezes, Director, Polar Research and Policy Initiative; Director, Think-Film Impact Production: Arts and Culture
  • Ilan Kelman, Reader, UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction, University College London,Member of the Advisory Board, Polar Research and Policy Initiative: Education and Risk Management
  • Thomas Bishop, Project Lead, WilkinsonEyre Head, Built Environment Unit, Polar Research and Policy Initiative: Architecture and Infrastructure
  • Domagoj Baresic, Fellow, Shipping Unit, Polar Research and Policy Initiative, Global Energy Institute, University College London: Shipping
  • Nic Craig, Fellow, Energy Unit, Polar Research and Policy Initiative: Energy
  • Richard Clifford, Fellow, Geopolitics and Security Unit, Polar Research and Policy Initiative: Scotland and the North

Chair: 

  • Terzah Tippin Poe, Lecturer, Harvard University, Member of the Advisory Board, Polar Research and Policy Initiative

Swiss Research and the Arctic: climate dynamics based on ice cores and atmospheric measurements

Organized by: Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (5. September 2017)

The session will give insight into the various scientific contributions of Switzerland, an Observer State to the Arctic Council, to the polar research.

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Saturday, October 14, 11:20 - 12:00
Location: Ríma A, Ground Level

From pristine preindustrial atmospheric conditions to sooty air – understanding climate dynamics based on ice cores and atmospheric measurements from the Polar Regions represents an opportunity to develop sustainability strategies from a regional to a global scale.

The presentation of the historic as well as the recent climate records will set the stage for a discussion on strategies to allow for a sustainable future of the Arctic. A series of brief presentations will follow and will highlight the latest findings based on the analyses of polar ice cores and air pollution, in particular those related to the natural state of the climate system of the Polar Regions

Speakers:

  • Julia Schmale, Ph.D., Researcher, Paul Scherrer Institute: Influences of anthropogenic particulates on climate
  • Thomas Stocker, Professor, University of Bern, past Co-chair of IPPC AR 5 WG 1 – The Physical Science Basis: The Polar Areas: Archive of Earth System Vulnerability

Chair:

Stefan Flückiger, Ambassador, Head of Global Issues, Coordinator of Arctic Policies, Federal Department of Foreign Affairs, Switzerland

Arctic Climate Predictions: Pathways to Resilient, Sustainable Societies (ARCPATH)

Organized by the Stefansson Arctic Institute, the University of Iceland, and the University of Bergen (11. September 2017)

This panel will introduce and discuss the NordForsk-funded Nordic Centre of Excellence project Arctic Climate Predictions: Pathways to Resilient, Sustainable Societies (ARCPATH) - a direct continuation of the NordForsk project Impacts of Sea-Ice and Snow-Cover Changes on Climate, Green Growth, and Society (GREENICE).  

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Saturday, October 14, 08:00 - 09:00

The scope and aims of the session reflect those of the projects: to supply new knowledge on Arctic issues by combining improved regional climate predictions with enhanced understanding of environmental, societal, and economic interactions. This involves extensive cross-disciplinary collaboration encompassing: climatology (regional and global modelling; dynamic downscaling; historical climatology); environmental science; environmental economics; oceanography and cryosphere research; marine and fisheries biology; fisheries management; anthropology; governance systems; human eco-dynamics; and traditional ecological knowledge. Drawing on these separate but interlinking disciplines will ensure the foundation of a truly synergistic Centre of Excellence where the overarching goal is to foster responsible and sustainable development in northern communities.

Speakers:

  • Noel Keenlyside, Professor, Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen: Global and Arctic Climate Predictions
  • Astrid Ogilvie, Senior Scientist, Stefansson Arctic Institute and INSTAAR and Leslie King, Professor and Director, Canadian Centre for Environmental Education, Royal Roads University: Syntheses of Arctic Climate and Environmental Change and Human Eco-Dynamics
  • Níels Einarsson, Director, Stefansson Arctic Institute: Sea Change in North Atlantic Arctic Coastal Communities
  • Marianne Rasmussen, Director, University of Iceland: Climate, Cetaceans and Tourism.
  • Elizabeth Ogilvie, Environmental Artist: Out of Ice: Sea Ice and Northern Communities

 

Chair:

Brynhildur Daviðsdóttir, Professor, University of Iceland

Mind and body – Population health and wellbeing in Greenland

Organized by the National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen Centre for Health Research in the Humanities (CoRe), University of Copenhagen and CSR Greenland (7. September 2017)

This session is focused on public health and projects that aim to improve the overall health and well-being of the Greenlandic population by focusing on individual everyday life habits and perceptions as well as on societal and cultural practices.

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Saturday, October 14, 08:00 - 09:00 
Location: Ríma A, Ground Level

Indigenous populations in the Arctic are undergoing rapid changes and face large challenges regarding their health and well-being. Based on large population-based health surveys conducted repeatedly since 1993, Greenland has been able to monitor the public health challenges and the transition from infectious diseases towards more lifestyle-related diseases and increasingly challenges related to mental health and well-being.

In this session, we present research on public health and mental well-being, healthy ageing and health promotion through the workplace. Whereas the overview of major challenges in public health and mental health serves as a conceptual framework of understanding the problems, the presented projects about healthy ageing and health promotion through the workplace are examples of solutions.

Speakers: 

  • Peter Bjerregaard, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark/ University of Greenland: Major public health challenges in Greenland.
  • Christina VL Larsen, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark/ University of Greenland: Mental health in Greenland and Arctic perspectives on mental health promotion
  • Tenna Jensen, Copenhagen Centre for Health Research in the Humanities (CoRe), University of Copenhagen: Healthy ageing in the Arctic.
  • Lotte Frank Kirkegaard, CSR Greenland: Promoting health through the work place.

Marine Litter: New Evidence from the Arctic

Organized by: The Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, with experts from Wageningen University, Utrecht University and Leemans Maritime Consultancy. (5. September 2017)

This session is the second in a series at Arctic Circle and will introduce the dynamics of marine litter deposition in the Arctic and present important new evidence from a recent Dutch study on Svalbard and Jan Mayen.

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Friday, October 13, 17:55 - 19:25

Location: Ríma A, Ground Level

Research indicates that ocean currents carry considerable volumes of litter from other locations and deposit them in the Arctic, including the Svalbard archipelago and the island of Jan Mayen. Not much is known about the amount and type of marine litter on the shores of these two remote Arctic areas, let alone their sources. The featured study, sponsored by the Netherlands, is addressing these questions.

It is hoped that the findings can advance both understanding and management of marine litter in the Svalbard Archipelago, but also contribute to policy development in the context of the Arctic Council and other relevant fora.

The session, which will be moderated by Jorden Splinter, Senior Arctic Official and Senior Advisor on Polar Affairs at the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs and will involve interventions by each panelist, followed by an exchange of views with the audience.

Participants are invited to an informal networking reception immediately after the session.

Speakers:

  • Tom van Oorschot, Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to Iceland: Welcome
  • Erik van Sebille, Associate Professor, Utrecht University: Chasing plastic: sources, fate and impact of marine litter in the Arctic“Arctic Marine Litter, sources,
  • “Arctic Marine Litter, sources, solutions and action”
    • Wouter Jan Strietman, Project Manager and Researcher, Wageningen University and Research
    • Eelco Leemans, Founder and CEO, Leemans Maritime Consultancy
  • Jan Belgers, Senior Expedition Leader, Oceanwide Expeditions: A Cruise Company’s Take on Reducing Arctic Waste

Chair:

  • Jorden Splinter, Senior Adviser on Polar Affairs, Senior Arctic Official Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Climate Change at High Northern Latitudes

the NordForsk Nordic Centre of Excellence: eScience Tools for Investigating Climate Change at High Northern Latitudes (eSTICC) (19. September 2017)

This session presents research on climate change in the Arctic, in particular: 

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the interaction of the Greenland ice sheet with the climate system in warm scenarios, the impact of ice sheet melting on the Ocean, a Pan-Arctic study of aerosol properties and sources, modelling the effect of air quality regulation on the Arctic climate, and climate whirl at high latitudes: combining natural and social sciences in higher education and science outreach. These results are presented by scientists from the Nordic research projects “eScience Tools for Investigating Climate Change at High Northern Latitudes” (eSTICC) and “Stability and Variations of Arctic Land Ice” (SVALI). Both eSTICC and SVALI have been appointed and funded by NordForsk as Nordic Centres of Excellence.


Speakers:

  • Hans-Christen Hansson, Professor, Stockholm University: Modeling the effect of air quality regulation on the Arctic climate
  • Eyal Freud, Postdoctoral researcher, Stockholm University: Pan Arctic study of aerosol properties and sources
  • Antti Lauri, Research Director, University of Helsinki: Climate Whirl at High Latitudes: combining natural and social sciences in higher education and science outreach
  • Josefin Ahlkrona, Postdoctoral researcher, University of Kiel/Cluster of Excellence “The Future Ocean”: The Impact of Ice Sheet Melting on the Ocean – Reducing Uncertainty in Predictions of Future Sea-Level Rise and Ocean Circulation by Improving Computer Models
  • Guðfinna Aðalgeirsdóttir, Professor, University of Iceland: Interaction of the Greenland Ice Sheet with the climate system in warm scenarios as simulated in the coupled model system EC-Earth–PISM

Chair:

Helmut Neukirchen, Professor, University of Iceland

Blue Growth in the Arctic – High North Series

Organized by the High North Center, Nord University, Bodø; The Arctic Institute, Washington DC; and the Institute of the North, Anchorage, Alaska, Washington DC (13. September 2017)

This session will explore and examine the potential of “blue” growth, meaning growth in the Arctic concerned with, or driven by, the maritime domain. This does not only include maritime industries (fisheries, oil and gas, shipping, etc.), but also societies and communities living by and off the ocean.

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Friday, October 13, 17:45 - 19:15
Location: Ríma B, Ground Level


We will discuss opportunities for growth in maritime industries, across Arctic regions and states. Panelists will come from both academia and industry, with different approaches to the same questions. These include: What is the potential going forward for maritime communities? What are current trends in maritime industries and what are barriers to growth? How do we regulate, govern and secure our use of the blue domain, as activity patterns and climate change? What role do politics and business hold going forward?

Structure: Each speaker is given approx. 3-5 minutes, followed by discussion/ Q&A.

Speakers:

  • Odd Jarl Borch, Professor, Nord University Business School: Safety challenges and emergency preparedness gaps in the High North
  • Elana Wilson Rowe, Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI): Maritime Growth: Politics or Business or both
  • Nils Andreassen, Executive Director, Institute of the North: The Alaskan State of the Arctic
  • Ida Pinnerød, Mayor, Bodø Municipality: Smart cities in the Arctic: the case of Bodø
  • Felix Tschudi, Chairman and Owner Tschudi Group and chairman of Centre of High North Logistics: Arctic shipping
  • Alexandra Middleton, Assistant Professor, University of Oulu: Business Index North - How to Measure Growth
  • Frode Mellemvik, High North Center, Nord University: Barriers to and opportunities for Arctic Growth
  • Andreas Østhagen, Doctoral Research Fellow, Fridtjof Nansen Institute, Norway & PhD-candidate, University of British Columbia, Canada: Cooperation across borders: the maritime dimension

Chair:

Arne O. Holm, Editor in chief, High North News

United Kingdom: science, innovation and international cooperation in Arctic research

Organized by The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Arctic Office, United Kingdom. In association with the British Antarctic Survey & Scottish Association for Marine Science (7. September 2017)

To have a fully effective international and coordinated approach to Arctic research, a country needs to have: capable assets; dedicated funding; strong connections; and successful communication and outreach programmes

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Friday, October 13, 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Esja, Fifth Level

This breakout session gives participants the opportunity to hear the latest news on how the United Kingdom is further sharpening its Arctic research capabilities to help improve our collective understanding of this rapidly changing region. These developments include: a new multi-million research programme targeted on the changing Arctic Ocean and its ecosystem; a new world-class polar research vessel, the RRS Sir David Attenborough; an Arctic Office focused on supporting national and international collaboration; and examples of cutting-edge ways to communicate Arctic change and the role they play in influencing both decision-makers, including the public.

Speakers:

  • Mark Brandon, Reader in Polar Oceanography, The Open University: Cutting-edge ways to communicate Arctic change
  • Kirsty Crocket, Science Coordinator, NERC Changing Arctic Ocean Programme, Scottish Association for Marine Science: The Changing Arctic Ocean: An overview of the programme’s aims and the projects involved
  • Tim Stockings, Operations Director, British Antarctic Survey: A new polar research ship for the United Kingdom: RRS Sir David Attenborough
  • Henry Burgess, Head, NERC Arctic Office: Building national and international connections: the role of the NERC Arctic Office

Chair:

Dame Jane Francis, Director, British Antarctic Survey

INTERACT Basecamp: Access to the Arctic

Organized by: INTERACT, Lund University. Address: Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund University, (14. September 2017)

Welcome to INTERACT basecamp! INTERACT is an EU Horizon2020 funded infrastructure that specifically seeks to build capacity for research and monitoring in the Arctic, and is offering access to numerous research stations through its Transnational Access program. In our basecamp you will learn more about the network and the opportunities it provides to visit the Arctic. Join our event and you might leave as the next Champion of the INTERACT Card Game!

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Friday, October 13, 21:00 - 22:00
Location: Akrafjall, Fourth Level

Speakers:

  • Margareta Johansson, Research Coordinator, INTERACT Coordinator, Lund University, Sweden: Welcome to the INTERACT Basecamp 
  • Morten Rasch, PhD, Chief Consultant, University of Copenhagen, Chairman of INTERACT Station Manager Forum: INTERACT Stations and an Introduction to the Station Card ame
  • “Access to the Arctic through INTERACT”
    • Hannele Savela, Research Coordinator, Thule Institute, University of Oulu
    • Kirsi Latola, PhD, Research Coordinator, Director of UArctic Thematic Networks, Thule Institute, University of Oulu

Chair:

  • Margareta Johansson, Research Coordinator, INTERACT Coordinator, Lund University, Sweden

Technical solutions leading to lower carbon footprint.

Organized by: Innovation Centre Iceland (ICI) (5. September 2017)

When the Innovation Centre Iceland was established by law in 2007 it was clear that one of the most important missions was technological development that was intended to enhance quality of life.

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Saturday, October 14, 11:20 - 12:20
Location: Flói, Ground Level

Since the onset we have concentrated on many aspects of environmental matters. Among those the technological developments that will be expected to affect the carbon footprint of humans. In this breakout session we will focus on a number of projects that have this main goal.
There will be six projects reported. They range from the replacement of nylon fishing nets with light rays; to heating a town with the Gulf stream, to powering cell-phone systems without using diesel generators; to strengthening concrete and plastics with green basalt base fibers from rock; to make electricity from luke-warm water and finally to produce the greenest concrete on Earth.
We celebrate these achievements with many institutions, corporations and individuals which we thank for. Many of the projects herald paradigm shifts.

Speakers:

  • Kristjan Leósson, Innovation Centre Iceland: Trawling with Light Instead of nylon – a paradigm shift in fishing technology
  • “Heating an Arctic Island With the Gulf Stream”
    • Kolbrún Ragnarsdóttir, HS veitur
    • Thorsteinn I. Sigfusson ICI and University of Iceland
  • “The Arctic Telecom project”
    • Saemundur Thorsteinsson University of Iceland
    • Thorsteinn I. Sigfusson ICI
  • “Green Basalt Fibres for use in the Industry”
    • Birgir Johannesson ICI
    • Thorsteinn I. Sigfusson
  • “The XRG Low Temperature Electricity Generator”
    • Mjöll Waldorff ICI and XRG
    • Thorsteinn I. Sigfusson:
  • Olafur Wallevik, ICI and University of Reykjavik: The Greenest Concrete in the World
  • “Carbfix: Capturing CO2 from air”
    • Christoph Gebald, Founder and Director, Climeworks AG
    • Edda Sif Aradóttir, Project Manager, The Carbfix Team, Reykjavík Energy

Chair:

Thorsteinn I. Sigfusson, Prof. Director General ICI

Global Impacts in the Arctic – Implications of the Globalized Arctic Worldwide

Organized by the GlobalArctic Project, and Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security (13. September 2017)

While globalization impacts the Arctic, many things that are currently happening in the Arctic have global implications and consequences, be it in ecological (Earth System dynamics), in economic (resources extracted from the Arctic, Arctic shipping) and geo-political terms (conflicts arising around Arctic resources and other economic issues).

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Friday, October 13, 16:25 - 17:55
Location: Silfurberg A, Second Level

In other words, the Arctic region has become part and parcel of systemic global environmental, economic, technological, cultural and political change. In this session, we will discuss the ‘globalized’ Arctic as a place both produced by global processes and affecting global processes, as well as initiating potential innovations for policy formulations, through the way its transformation is being governed.

Speakers:

  • Cécile Pelaudeix, Associate Professor, Aarhus University & Research associate PACTE-Sciences Po Grenoble: International Norm Dynamics and Arctic Governance
  • Michael Byers, Professor & Canada Research Chair, Department of Political Science, University of British Columbia: Arctic International Law is Global International Law
  • Florian Vidal – Ph.D. Candidate, University of Paris Descartes: Globalized Arctic: From the Andean Mountains to the Barents region
  • Alexander Pelyasov, Director, Center for the Arctic and Northern economies: Corporate Russian Arctic: Role of Russian Arctic Resource Corporations Locally and Globally
  • Lassi Heininen, Professor, University of Lapland: A Lesson to Learn from Arctic Geopolitics – High Stability as an Asset to (Re)Formulate World Politics?

Moderator:

Matthias Finger, Professor, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale Lausanne (EPFL):

Sustainable Arctic Development in the Era of Low Carbon Transition

Organized by the Arctic Institute, the Scottish Government, UK Government Science & Innovation Network – Nordics (13. September 2017)

While there is a great deal of research about the impact of climate change on the Arctic, there is much less work about the role the Arctic itself can play in making the transition to a low carbon economy that is critical to the region’s economy, environment, and public health. 

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Saturday, October 14, 16:00 - 17:30
Location: Hafnarkot, Ground Level

This breakout session will bring together cross-disciplinary academic and industry experts from the Arctic states and the UK to explore the challenges, opportunities, and scalability of current low-carbon energy projects and development methods. The aim of this event is to foster a dialogue between Arctic and non-Arctic stakeholders to identify pathways to reduce the carbon footprint and wider environmental, economic, and health impacts of Arctic development, by exploiting low carbon innovation to produce clean energy and industrial decarbonisation, as well as adopting strategies around corporate environmental and social responsibility. The session will begin with a series of 10-minute presentations, followed by an interactive panel discussion and Q&As from the audience.

Speakers:

  • Antti Arasto, Research Manager, Solutions for Natural Resources and Environment, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland: Wealth from bio economy - national economy perspective on transition to integrated bio- and low carbon technologies
  • Enrique Troncoso, Engineering Consultant / Project leader at Boeing Research & Technology: BIG HIT: Creating a Green Hydrogen Energy System in the Orkney Islands
  • Edvard Glücksman, Senior Environmental and Social Specialist at Wardell Armstrong LLP and University of Exeter: Lessons from Central Asia
  • Berit Kristoffersen, Political geographer and associate professor at UiT – the Arctic University of Norway: Post-petroleum Arctic futures: Potentials and controversies
  • Jane Burston, Head of Energy and Environment, National Physical Laboratory: Measuring methane: from lasers to ghostbusters
  • Gwen Holdmann, Director, Alaska Center for Energy and Power, University of Alaska Fairbanks
  • Andy Kerr, Executive Director, Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Innovation (ECCI), University of Edinburgh: Shared lessons for the Arctic from developing vibrant low carbon communities and regions

Chair:

Louise Heathwaite, Professor of Land and Water Science in the Lancaster Environment Centre at Lancaster University

North in Focus: Youth Voices of Integrative Mental Health and Suicide Awareness

Organized by North in Focus Mental Health Organization (13. September 2017)

Youth Voices of Integrative Mental Health and Suicide Awareness introduces the current efforts made by youth on the topic of mental health and suicide, focusing on the work of North in Focus as a non-profit organization while integrating the perspectives of other youth councils and initiatives. 

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Friday, October 13, 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Norðurljós, Second Level

 

Being youth led and youth focused, NIF aims to contribute to mental health resource accessibility in Canada’s North through developing avenues of self-expression. The implementation of these unique techniques for youth empowerment has merited the onset of experiential education potential in healthcare. The breakout discussion strives to define both the importance and potential procedures of integrating youth perspectives in mental health policy reforms and implementation, especially for programs and initiatives that directly affect the noted demographic.

Speakers: 

  • Eva Wu - Co-Founder, Finance and Media Coordinator of North in Focus; Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Youth Ambassador for Parks Canada: The History of North in Focus and the Power of Communication through Photography.
  • Ashley Cummings - Northern Consultant, Alumni and Ambassador Coordinator of North in Focus: Personal Experience of Mental Health in the North and the Wellness Attached to Culture and Intergenerational Healing.